The Briefly for March 23, 2020 – The “NYC’s First COVID-19 Scumbag Politician Has Emerged” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It is no longer showtime folks, COVID-19 updates, DMV closed, Amazon is possibly coming to Red Hook, Harvey Weinstein has coronavirus, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 45˚
Rain throughout the day.

New York is now considered a disaster area. Hooray? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Department of Environmental Conservation was planning to begin enforcement of the plastic bag ban on April 1, but it has been delayed until May 1. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This is the moment when local politicians are starting to use the coronavirus outbreak for their own purposes. City Councilmember Chaim Deutsch, representing Brighton Beach, Midwood, and Sheepshead Bay, is using this moment to call for an end to the plastic bag ban. Deutsch was the lone vote on the City Council against the 5 cent paper bag fee and wrote an op-ed for The Yeshiva World titled “Are Plastic Bags The New Bail Reform?” arguing against the plastic bag ban. This is a disgusting use of a genuine crisis to push a personal agenda. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Harvey Weinstein, an expert in non-consent, has something inside of him that he did not ask for: COVID-19. (Rebecca Fishbein for Jezebel)

An updated resource guide for artists and freelancers. (Savannah James for Bushwick Daily)

How to support the city’s venues during the outbreak. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Photos: One of the most devastating weeks for NYC restaurants. (Gary He for Eater)

A list of relief funds for the city’s restaurant workers. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A tiny sliver of good news: You’ve got until July 15 to file your taxes. (Brian Faler for Politico)

Marine Park Hardware Corporation: a destination for tomato sauce? (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A bike ride through the neighborhoods surrounding Wall Street and City Hall. (ActionKid)

I was planning on growing out a “plague beard,” but it seems like we’re all headed in a shaggier direction, as salons and barbershops were ordered closed but the governor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Douglas Elliman executive chairman Howard Lorber warns that a tax on second homes for the rich could “be a disaster, not just for real estate, but for the economy in New York.” Buddy, maybe it’s time to rethink the use of the term disaster. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Love is dead. The city’s marriage bureau is closed until further notice. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The DMV is closed until further notice. The concern over traveling with a REAL ID come October isn’t nearly as pressing right now, but unless that deadline gets extended, New York is in for a real mess come October. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

Gem Spa is closed, temporarily. (EV Grieve)

Calls are getting louder to put a construction moratorium in place during the outbreak. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Thanks to Governor Cuomo, we’re all on PAUSE, which is absolutely not a shelter-in-place order, or else he’d be agreeing to something Mayor de Blasio proposed. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

In order to allow the real estate industry to continue moving forward, the governor is authorizing notaries to sign documents virtually. Wait, how does something get virtually notarized? (E.B.Solomont for The Real Deal)

Amazon is bidding on four former Fairway Market stores, including a Brooklyn location which I assume is the former Red Hook store. The other three are outside the city. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Revel is offering free memberships to healthcare workers and is expanding its service area to cover multiple additional medical centers. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The governor requested that FEMA erect four 250-bed Federal hospitals at the Javits Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The city’s hospitals are running dangerously low on personal protective gear. City health officials told hospitals to stop testing patients unless they needed hospitalization. Each test administered requires an entire set of gowns, gloves, and masks that can’t be reused. Without help, the city will run out of supplies in two weeks. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

How to donate supplies to hospitals. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

It’s the worst time to give birth in New York City. All visitors, including partners, are banned from maternity wards in NewYork-Presbyterian hospitals. (Rebecca Fishbein for Jezebel)

Andrew Yang announced his foundation Humanity Forward was partnering with One Fair Wage for a Universal Basic Income pilot program to give $1,000 to 1,000 families in the Bronx and more for families across the country hit with job losses during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

10 great outdoor sculptures in NYC you can visit without getting too close to other people. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Broadway producers reached an “emergency relief agreement” agreement to pay hundreds of actors, musicians, stagehands, and others for the first few weeks of the industry shut down, and to cover their health insurance for at least a month. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Bike shops are now considered essential businesses and will stay open across the city. (Gersh Kuntsman for Streetsblog)

The city will add emergency protected bike lanes on Second Ave in Manhattan and on Smith Street in Brooklyn by the end of next week in an effort to increase bike safety. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Saying that “a storm is coming” is an absolutely terrifying thing for the jail’s chief physician to say. (Jan Ransom and Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Here’s how students and teachers are prepping for their first day of remote learning. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

For the first time in a long time, it’s no longer showtime. (Jake Bittle for Gothamist)

A look at the role of doormen during an epidemic. (Guy Trebay for NY Times)

RIP Eli Miller, one of the last seltzer men of NYC. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Go watch some birds. Not birdwatching, but just watch some birds. Without crowds of people to sit and watch, the Times makes the case to relax and imagine what all those geese are gossiping about. (James Gorman and Natalie Keyssar for NY Times)

Don’t flush disinfectant wipes or toilet paper down the toilet. DO NOT. (Michael Levenson for NY Times)

New York state passed a new sick-leave bill for employees who are subject to a mandatory quarantine or isolation due to COVID-19. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Headlines: Help, I Think I’m In Love With Andrew Cuomo??? and My Best Recollection of the Call I Just Had With Andrew Cuomo. (Rebecca Fishbein for Jezebel)

Thank you to reader Robert for today’s featured photo from the Imani Garden in Crown Heights!

The Briefly for December 16, 2019 – The “A Bathroom Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD’s secret gang database isn’t going anywhere, the fate of electric bikes and scooters hangs in the balance, the best new restaurants of 2019, & more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 37˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

Late night disruptions are headed to the 7, A, F, J, and Q trains this week. Check the trains before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

From the inspiration wall to the sprinkle pool, a look inside the Museum of Ice Cream, which opened over the weekend. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Tenants in two Upper East Side NYCHA developments are suing to correct years of neglect and pervasive dysfunction, which were estimated to be at $100 million in 2017. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A bathroom grows in Bushwick. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The de Blasio administration has reached a deal with homeless advocates and City Council members to require certain developers receiving city funding to set aside 15 percent of their new rental units for homeless New Yorkers. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Check out the anti-slavery landmark interactive story map from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

This one’s worded a little weird. The headline is “areas that weren’t a thing 10 years ago,” and I’d argue that Gowanus or the Brooklyn Navy Yard existed, but they weren’t real estate hot spots. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The NYPD keeps a secret database of somewhere between 17,500 and 37,000 people, called the “Criminal Group Database.” There’s no evidence why you are included or how to get off it. The gang database is the target of the “Erase the Database” campaign, but the new NYPD commissioner and the mayor are both staunch supporters of it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A 13-year-old boy was arrested and charged in connection to the fatal stabbing of 18-year-old Barnard student Tessa Majors. The NYPD believes two additional people were involved in the stabbing. (Michael Gold, Jan Ransom and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The sense of safety that Morningside Park, which separates Columbia University from Harlem, has carried is recent years has changed with 20 robberies this year and punctuated with Tessa Majors’ murder. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

There’s a rumor that an abandoned train car with bullet-proof armor under the Waldorf Astoria was used by FDR to transport his limousine. While Baggage Car 002, the train car in question, wasn’t FDR’s, Track 61 has been used to move presidents and other government officials in and out of the Waldorf from the 30s through 2017. Baggage Car 002 is now at the Danbury Railway Museum. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Photos: Inside the Schitt’s Creek pop-up shop. (Jen Carlson, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist

Manhattan’s “bad cops list” has been released. DA Cyrus Vance released the list of NYPD officers with credibility problems in court thanks to a Freedom of Information request from WNYC/Gothamist. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

The Department of Transportation is turning to a new tactic with a series of Vision Zero ads targeting drivers: shame. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: More from the inside of the Museum of Ice Cream. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Jazmine Headley reached a $625,000 settlement with the city for the “formative incident of trauma” when her child was ripped from her during an arrest inside a assistance center. She was arrested for sitting on the floor and spend four nights in Rikers Island. Her arrest was caught on video and went viral. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s struggling actors have a new side hustle. Say goodbye to actor-waiters and say hello to actor-spin instructors. (Jae Thomas for Bedford + Bowery)

Governor Cuomo has a bill to legalize electric bikes and scooters, but there is no sign that he will sign it. (Zack Finn for NY1)

A look at the gossip inside the Gambino crime family, following the murder to the reputed underboss Francesco Cali in March. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Mayor Bill de Blasio say the NYPD’s arrest rate is “high” for hate crimes. The number is 42%. (Samir Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Governor Cuomo is looking to prevent people from getting a New York gun license if they have committed a serious crime in another state, including misdemeanors like forcible touching and other sex offenses. This is the first public proposal that will be outlined in his 2020 state of the state speech. (amNewYork)

The MTA rolled out its first all-electric articulated bus on Sunday, one of a new fleet that is part of the agency’s plan to shift away from diesel-powered buses in the years ahead. Articulated buses are double the length of a normal bus. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 30, 2018 – The “Couldn’t They Wait Until After Halloween?” Edition

The NYPD starts a crackdown on sanitation companies, Hurricane Sandy six years later, the NYPL gets an exclusive black card, another reason why the subways are slow, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Imagine being pulled over for doing 35 mph in a 50 mph speed zone. Now you know the frustration that subway operators face on a regular basis due to faulty signal timers, which leads to lagging subway speeds. (amNY)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has been chosen. They couldn’t wait until after Halloween? (NY Post)

If you stand in the lobby of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, you are with one of America’s greatest poets. Underneath the lobby are the remains of Langston Hughes. (Atlas Obscura)

Do you love fried chicken? Do you love it enough to wait in line for 20 hours in the rain? (Eater)

Activists held a “die-in” at Trump Tower on the sixth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy hitting the city with a plea for the president to act to reduce global warming. They are also asking the NY Legislature to pass the Climate and Community act, which would reduce levels 100% by 2050. (amNY) Here’s how the city is preparing for the next Hurricane Sandy. (Curbed)

The new, limited edition, “Knowledge is Power” black NYPL card is pretty slick. First come first served and there’s only 70,000 available. (6sqft)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill thinks more guns is not the solution; to the country’s gun violence problem and credits New York City’s tough gun laws for our current record lows. (NY Post)

The former J&R buildings near City Hall will be replaced by parks, public libraries and schools. ? Just kidding it’ll be million dollar plus condos. (Cubed)

Two years ago, Zaida Pugh dumped 600 crickets and mealworms on her fellow D train passengers as they crossed the Manhattan Bridge, causing someone to pull the emergency brake. That stranded the train on the bridge for an hour. Always remember that your commute could be worse. (NY Post)

The greatest pizza places in Brooklyn. (Thrillist)

Why the hell does it seem like the Harvey Weinstein case is falling apart? (NY Times)

A very rare duck has found its way to Central Park and bird twitter is very excited. (Gothamist)

60% of all new apartments built in the city by 2020 will be in Brooklyn or Queens. (Curbed)

The two women found dead and duct taped together in the Hudson River have been identified as Tala and Rotana Farea, but how they ended up there is still under investigation. (Gothamist)

Apple takes the stage at BAM today (Tuesday) to announce (rumored) new iPads and computers. (Digg)

An NYU professor who refers to himself as “The Anti-PC Professor” invited Milo Yiannopoulos to speak to his class as a challenge to what he perceives as the university’s censorship. This should go well. (Gothamist)

Target’s NYC takeover continues, with Columbus Circle getting a “small-format” stone in 2019. (6sqft)

The NYPD is beginning to crack down on private sanitation companies after the industry’s “constant disregard for the law,” according to Chief of Department of the NYPD Terence Monahan. (Streetsblog)

Do you know your hurricane evacuation zone number? (nyc.gov)

It’s like a bar, but without alcohol. (Free Williamsburg)


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