The Briefly for February 5, 2019 – The “Goose-Related Subway Delays” Edition

A possible CBD ban, State Senator Michael Gianaris could end the Amazon HQ2 deal, State of the Union protests, the hardest job in NYC, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at two of the State of the Union protests planned across the city. (amNY)

There were some goose-related delays on the Q train on Monday afternoon. (NY Post)

The 9/11 Memorial & Museum will add a section in May dedicated to people who died or became ill with 9/11-related illnesses. (Curbed)

10x TONY award winning “The Band’s Visit” will end its Broadway run on April 7. (NY Times)

The state saw an unplanned $2.3 billion drop in income tax revenue, which will force the state to curb spending. In some parts of the city, that’s called an “Amazon sized hole.” (NY Post)

New York City’s lack of cash crops ended slavery. In 1790, African Americans accounted for over 30% of Brooklyn’s population and most were enslaved. (Greenpointers)

10 new art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Hope. Love. Utopian. Finding optimism on city streets. (6sqft)

A rundown of the wave of laws that followed new blue wave in the state’s legislature. (NY Times)

A 72-year-old cyclist was killed in a hit-and-run while riding in the bike lane on Eight Avenue at 45th St. It was the second cyclist death in three days. (Gothamist)

The state’s Public Authorities Control Board isn’t well known, but it could kill the Amazon HQ2 deal. The state senate appointed the anti-Amazon Senator Michael Gianaris to sit on the board, of which any of the three members can veto the project. (The Real Deal)

Get your CBD-infused food and drinks now, because the Department of Health may be banning its use as a food additive. (Eater)

Jennifer Irigoyen, 35-year-old real estate agent and fitness instructor, was stabbed to death in her Ridgewood apartment building around 1am on Sunday night. Irigoyen a was five months pregnant and no arrests have been made. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit calls the conditions at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are a “a humanitarian crisis,” according to a lawsuit filed by the Federal Defenders of New York. (Gothamist)

The arguments for and against landmarking the Strand Bookstore. (West View News)

The city is moving to fire the security officer who pulled Jazmine Headley’s 1-year-old son from her arms at a Brooklyn benefits center in December of last year. A second officer has resigned. (NY Post)

Clothing and accessories by cat people for cat people to promote feral cat awareness. Yes, they’re in Bushwick. How’d you know? (Bushwick Daily)

A man with MS-13 affiliations was arrested in connection to the shooting on the 90th St-Elmhurst Avenue 7 train platform. (NY Times)

The City Council is considering a foie gras ban. (Gothamist)

Is Netflix’s “Russian Doll” an allegory for Tompkins Square Park? (Gothamist)

After the first day of deliberations, the jury has not come to a verdict in El Chapo’s trial on day one. (amNY)

A 16-year-old 92nd Street Y camp counselor says she was blacklisted after she accused an older counselor of sexual assault. (NY Post)

If you thought your job was hard, meet Pete Tomlin. As NYC Transit’s new modern signal chief, Tomlin is responsible for modernizing 90% of the subway’s signals. Good luck Pete, you’ll need it. (amNY)

15 restaurants that “feel like Japan.” (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 28, 2019 – The “A Complete Lack of Ability to Enforce the Law” Edition

Big changes to the L train’s schedule, what the government shutdown’s shutdown means for NYC, a couch in a tree, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The 2, 3, 4, 7, A, D, E, and L trains are going through some major service disruptions late nights. (Subway Changes)

Starting today, there is no overnight L service between Broadway Junction to Manhattan for eight weeks. Starting February 1, the L will be shutdown for seven weekends straight. Yipes. (Brooklyn Paper)

The government shutdown is over, here’s what it means for New York City. (Metro)

The city has been proven to be mostly impotent when it comes to removing the billboard boats from city waters. (Gothamist)

The NYPD can’t enforce traffic violations in bike lanes AND bus lanes. That would be crazy! (NY Post)

It’s been 27 years, but the NYPD arrested Calvin Grant for the alleged murder of Stacey Lynette Joyner in Brownsville. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Now that his opinion means nothing to the situation, Mayor de Blasio has decided that he supports the governor’s L Train repair plan. (NY Post)

Kudos to the winning team from the 2019 Idiotarod. Take a look at this year’s idiots. (Brian Lin)

The subways, explained. (Curbed)

The Daily News’ editorial board is in favor of subway, bus, and bridge toll hikes. (Daily News)

The $298 million Powerball winner has come forward, and he’s happy to tell you he quit his job. (NY Post)

Pity the millionaires who have been moving out of the New York City area because of the financial markets and taxes. 5,700 people worth between $1 and $30 million people have moved. (The Real Deal)

Meet the 65 year-old professor with 600,000 Instagram followers. (New York Magazine)

No one tell the city’s real estate developers that artists are embracing the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (amNY)

Of the 472 sexual harassment complaints by city employees in 2018, only 37 of them were resulted in termination, demotion, retirement, transfer, or suspension. (NY Post)

Seriously, how did this couch end up in this tree? (West Side Rag)

15 things you probably didn’t know about the East Village. (6sqft)

There’s beef between Bareburger and one of the New York’s franchisors. (NY Post)

Max Rose hasn’t been in the House of Representatives for a month and Republican challengers have already started to emerge. (Bklyner)

17 bars to BYOF (bring your own food). (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for September 10, 2018 – Brooklyn DA Will Absolve Low-Level Pot Possession Charges

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez announced a program that will allow New Yorkers to work towards wiping any low-level pot posession charges from their record, WTC Cortland is open, the election gets dirty, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez announced that his office will offer New York residents with a low-level conviction for marijuana possession the opportunity to wipe their record completely clean.

The last-minute mailer that the New York State Democrats sent in support of Andrew Cuomo that loosely implied Cynthia Nixon may have been an anti-Semite was poorly thought out to say the least. Scott Stringer is calling for state Democratic Party executive director Geoff Berman to resign as a result.

It took 11 months, two pairs of shoes, and 721 miles, but William B. Helmreich’s book “The Manhattan Nobody Knows: An Urban Walking Guide” is ready. This is his extensive second walking guide to an NYC borough.

“If you choose not to decide, you have still made a choice.” -Rush, Spirit of Radio. Dedicated to Bill de Blasio’s decision not to endorse either Gubernatorial Democratic primary candidate.

How will rezoning transform Governors Island’s evolving landscape? A photo essay from Curbed.

New York property tax has outpaced the growth of incomes by 300%.

The Department of Sanitation is being evicted from a garage in Kips Bay next week and their solution to this problem is parking garbage trucks on the street. The community is, as you might expect, not thrilled with this idea.

Mannie Corman’s 100th Birthday turned into a surprise wedding for attendees with his 72-year-old girlfriend.

Where do you find out about public meetings? Gothamist answers.

How do you become a, as The New York Times puts it, “underpaid, underappreciated, and absolutely necessary” poll worker?

What to do and eat in East Williamsburg, which amNY says can feel “post-apocalyptic.”

amNY endorsed Letitia James for NY attorney general.

The WTC Cortland St station on the 1 opened for the first time on Saturday since 9/11. It sports a cooling system for hot days, is handicapped accessible, and a piece of art named “CHORUS” by Ann Hamilton that displays the text from the Declaration of Independence and the Declaration of Human rights.

The city is looking at what options it has for enabling congestion pricing without Albany’s approval, as it did with school zone speed cameras.

Four pedestrians were killed on Northern Blvd this year and 19 have died since 2009. A 70-year-old man was hit on Sunday morning while crossing the road. Multiple advocate groups are lobbying the city to change the Boulevard of Death.

Is it safe to walk on subway grates? Streeteasy has your answer.

Miss America 2019 is Nia Franklin, Miss New York.

Another blow to the Staten Island Wheel as the city will no longer provide $140 million in funding to the ferris wheel that is expected to cost nearly a billion dollars.


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