The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “A Love Letter to the Salt Bagel” Weekend Edition

Fighting this weekend’s planned ICE raids, more people are staying put in Brooklyn and Queens, the city’s speed camera program starts to expand and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The president’s ICE raids scheduled to take place this weekend have included New York as a target. The governor announced anyone in need of assistance may contact the Liberty Defense Project via the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 or liberty@dos.ny.gov.

What should you do if ICE is at your door or the door of someone you know? Here are the ACLU’s guidelines and outlines of your rights. (ACLU)

The Amazon Web Services Summit at the Javitz Center drew crowds protesting Amazon’s involvement with ICE with their Rekognition Video system. (amNY)

Riding the subway still sucks, but it sucks the least its sucked since 2013, with an on-time performance over 80%. (Curbed)

Check the trains before you venture out this weekend. This is the last weekend of reduced L train service before the multi-week night and weekend partial shutdown starts and remains through January. (Subway Weekender)

R. Kelly was arrested by the NYPD and Homeland Security in Chicago on federal sex trafficking charges and is expected to be brought to New York to face those charges. (NBC New York)

A love letter to the salt bagel. (Eater)

The NYPD claims to have figured out the reason for an uptick of shootings in northern Brooklyn: District Attorney Eric Gonzalez. The NYPD is blaming a program where weapons-possession offenders can plead guilty and take part in an educational program instead of being jailed. Putting the blame on this program has two flaws. The program is a decade old, the uptick in shootings are only in one portion of the borough while the program is borough-wide, and it does not apply to anyone who has used a gun, only those possessing them. (Brooklyn Paper)

Have mannequin, will carpool. A hero from New Jersey was pulled over on the Verrazzano Bridge for trying to using his “friend” as a reason to use the HOV lane. (Gothamist)

The photos your friends post to Instagram from Storm King are nice and all, but have you thought about who’s job it is to mow the grass? Meet Mike Seaman, who leads a seven-person crew. (NY Times)

Much like Williamsburg, the neighborhood it calls home, the Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel and San Paolino di Nola is changing with the times. For the first time organizers opened up the carrying of the giglio, a four-ton and 72-foot-tall spire, and a life-size sculpture of a boat, to outsiders. This Sunday is giglio Sunday. (NY Times)

Irving Plaza is closed for eight months to be renovated. (EV Grieve)

The city provides about 146 square feet of green space per resident, which is smaller than a 12 foot by 12-foot room. Of the fifteen major cities in the story, New York was dead last. (Patch)

Speaking of green space, Shirley Chisholm State Park can lay claim to the title of “the city’s nicest park built on top of a toxic dump.” (Curbed)

In reflection of its 20th year, Untapped Cities sat down with Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond to discuss his favorite places in the city, future public projects, the Spur, and more. (Untapped Cities)

The latest step in a neighbor-feud in Kew Gardens is a bloody splattered mannequin who seems to be daring neighbors to call 311 against it. A truly amazing amount of pettiness. (Gothamist)

The expansion of the city’s speed camera program kicked off this week. The city will add 40-60 cameras a month until the number reaches 750 from the current 140. (Curbed)

“Slave Play,” a look at race relations through the prism of the sexual hangups of three interracial couples, is coming to Broadway this spring and will run for 17 weeks. (NY Times)

The reunited The Misfits announced their first-ever show at Madison Square Garden, tickets are on sale next week. (BrooklynVegan)

How Darren Walker, a gay black man who grew up poor in Texas, came to be one of the best-connected people in New York City. And what that means for the future of philanthropy. (NY Times)

A photo gallery of Coney Island through the years. (amNY)

The Parks Department publicly apologized to the family of Robert Sommer, who was one of the fifteen cyclists killed by drivers this year, for removing his memorial ghost bike in Marine Park without notifying his family first. (Brooklyn Paper)

Would you pay $275 to be a guest on a podcast? Say what you want, but it’s working for Uluç Ülgen, the host of mürmur, a podcast that is “part performance art, part social documentary, part mystical, and part comedy.” If you don’t want to pay the fee to appear, you can always subscribe on iTunes. (Bedford + Bowery)

A taxi jumped the curb and crashed into a Westville in Hell’s Kitchen on Ninth Avenue Westville. Five people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and three declined medical attention. No reason was released for the driver’s actions. (Gothamist)

The Washington Square Park “Die-In” to bring attention to the crisis created by the failures of the mayor’s Vision Zero program has worked. Nearly every media outlet in the city has written about it, and it has now received the New York Times treatment. (NY Times)

More and more people in Brooklyn and Queens are choosing to renew their leases instead of moving to new apartments. Rants in both boroughs are up, but rents in Queens are down 4.2% since May. (The Real Deal)

Mia Simmons, the 20-year-old woman charged with manslaughter for the stabbing death of 30-year-old Latanya Watson, was defending herself according to her lawyer. Video footage shows the pair fighting on the platform and Simmons’s lawyer claims Watson was the aggressor. (Gothamist)

An Ed Sheeran pop-up shop will be open on Wooster Street today from 3:06 through 9:06. Now you know where to go or where to avoid, depending who you are. (amNY)

Say hello to the Carrot Dog, the humane twist on the New York staple, which are now available ay by CHLOE. Delightful, disgusting, or both? (Gothamist)

Whoops, the Time Out Market in Dumbo was shut down by the Department of Health. The food hall is expected to be reopened shortly. (Eater)

The MTA’s rules restrict the kinds of secondary jobs its workers can hold, which three dozen violated by moonlighting as Lyft /Uber drivers without agency permission. Five were fired. (Patch)

The governor won’t sign a bill that would loosen restrictions on affidavit ballots that would also retroactively decide the contested Queens DA race. (Jackson Heights Post)

After the arrest of Tyresse Singleton for the alleged burning of rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge in Harlem, a new set of flags are proudly waving. (amNY)

A look inside the bribery and corruption of two men who are partially responsible for the current taxi medallion financial crisis. (NY Times)

Everyone has a friend who always chooses the most expensive restaurant possible and the bill for the eight of you looks like someone’s rent instead of a bill for the meal. That’s the inspiration behind the list of the best restaurants for affordable group dinners. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for July 5, 2019 – The “We’re Headed for a Cabán/Katz Recount” Weekend Edition

The MTA’s weekend subway plans, congrats to Joey Chestnut, our absentee mayor continues to be absentee, Cash Cab is back, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

I hope everyone had a great 4th of July, regardless if you celebrated or not. July 4th was a cause for celebration for The Briefly as well. It’s the one year anniversary of the first email sent by The Briefly. Thank you for being a reader.

You might think of it as a holiday weekend, but the MTA has other plans. 12 subway lines have planned disruptions this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Tiffany Cabán was 1,100 votes ahead of Melinda Katz on election night. As of July 4, she was 20 votes behind. Queens is headed for a manual recount. (NY Times)

More than 2,500 affidavit ballots were rejected and the Cabán campaign will be fighting to have them counted. This is the 2000 presidential election all over again. (Politico)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut on winning his 12th hot dog eating championship, with 71 hot dogs in 10 minutes. In Times Square, that would cost roughly $1,500. (amNY)

Despite what you experienced on July 4th, fireworks and sparklers continue to be illegal in New York. (amNY)

After multiple years and nearly a half billion dollars in renovations, full service on the N train has been restored in Brooklyn. (The City)

The panel of experts overseeing the rehab of the BQE hasn’t made any decisions, but have intimated that the plans the city has put forward, which include replacing the Brooklyn Promenade with a temporary highway, have little chance of being approved. (Brooklyn Paper)

Our mayor, who spent July 4th in Iowa, said “I’m a half-glass-full kind of guy” when it comes to his polling numbers, which are in the toilet. His office in New York, which is been full empty, as he pretends he’s not wasting time and money in Iowa. He missed the funeral for 9/11 responder and NYPD detective Lou Alvarez and failed to preside over the weigh-in for Nathan’s hot dog eating competition, something Mayor Bloomberg did 11 of the 12 years he was mayor. (Gothamist)

26 (kind of obvious, but still a solid list) things to do in the city this summer. (Curbed)

The Central Park bomber has been at-large for three years. (Gothamist)

There are 25 horses in the Prospect Park Stable, and each “manufacture” 75 pounds of poop daily, bringing the total to nearly a daily ton of horseshit. The owner of the stable has begun turning the manure into compost and gifting it to the nonprofit Red Hook Farms. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Got a hankering for strawberries? Here’s a list of where to get yourself a strawberry dessert. (Grub Street)

Bushwick’s The Notorious B.I.G. and Alfred Hitchcock mural was vandalized. A video was taken of the vandal, but they haven’t been found (Bushwick Daily)

Community Board 7 voted to approve a bike lane for Central Park West. The neighborhood will lose 400 parking spots in the process, but the board weighed those parking spots vs the life of Madison Lyden, who died after she was forced from the current bike lane by a parked cab and hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

Eliot Engel, who represents parts of the Bronx, Westchester, and Yonkers in the House of Representatives, is the next New York Democrat to be primaried from the left. His challengers cite is conservative views on Israel, the Middle East, and education among some of the reasons they feel he needs to be challenged. (Politico)

The city’s sheriff arrested Anthony Medina, a debt collector who allegedly scammed on cab drivers by pretending to be a city marshall to harass drivers into giving up their medallions and cabs and occasionally shook them down for cash. (Gothamist)

The East Village’s Mikey Likes It is closed after a tax-related seizure last week. (EV Grieve)

Cash Cab is back and will be filming in NYC this summer. (amNY)

The removal of the citizenship question from the 2020 census is a win for New York, as state Attorney General Letitia James’s office helped lead the charge against it. (Patch)

Four neighborhoods, Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, East New York, and Brownsville account for 23% of the city’s shootings this year. Despite a trend towards less violent crime in the city, shootings and reported rapes citywide have increased this year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Where to eat and what to do at the South Street Seaport. (amNY)

The principal of LaGuardia High School, Dr. Lisa Mars, has stepped down following a sit-in by the students and years of protests by students, teachers, and faculty. A divergence from the school’s mission is what drive the protests and the vote of “no confidence” in May. (Gothamist)

Serial subway groper Giovanni Verdelli has been arrested 70 times and the NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill is calling for his permanent banning from the subways. (Downtown Express)

The ultimate guide to Penn Station. (Curbed)

The man who tossed piss onto two transit workers in April, Brandon Jobson, was arrested and charged with two counts of assault. You’re in trouble, Brandon. (Gothamist)

The entire Brooklyn Congressional delegation called for the firing of Customer and Border Protection officers after posts in a private Facebook group with 9,000 members surfaces with threats to Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and insensitive comments about the ongoing crisis at the United States’ southern border. (Kings County Politics)

Spots for a big group hang outside. (The Infatuation)

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