The Briefly for January 31, 2020 – The Weekend “Three Story Tall Taco Ball in Midtown” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Breaking car culture on the BQE, Decolonize This Place wants to “f**k s**t up” on the subways, a Dolly Parton cover band reviews a Dolly Parton bar and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 44˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 45˚

Decolonize This Place plans to “fuck shit up” on the subways today. The group declared the 31st as a day of protest to send the message that New York will not tolerate the surge of police on the subways. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

100 bus stations in 18 neighborhoods across the city will sport a photo exhibition from artist Farah Al Qasimi called Back and Forth Disco, which celebrates “individuality and the aesthetic choices that make spaces and surroundings uniquely personal.” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

De Blasio’s panel focused on what to do with the crumbling BQE has a recommendation: Preserve the Brooklyn Promenade and close one lane in either direction, limiting the amount of traffic that can be on the road and encourage diversions. The recommendations are for the remaining time the BQE stands, but it will have to be replaced at some point in the future. If the city wants to break car culture, things have to get worse for drivers before it gets better for everyone. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Is Midtown ready for a three story Taco Bell Cantina? (Nicholas Rizzi for Commercial Observer)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has a plan for universal affordable housing. The mayoral hopeful’s plan would require a quarter of new apartments in any development with more than 10 apartments be set aside for tenants earning 60% of the area median income or $58,000 a year for a family of three. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

The most “affordable” neighborhood in Manhattan is Washington Heights, where you’ll only pay $652 per square foot. (emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Four Queens borough president candidates have been eliminated from the ballot, leaving Consta Constantinides, Elizabeth Crowler, Jim Quinn, and Dao Yin for March 24. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Nearly 2,000 kids might not be able to find a kindergarten to meet their needs this spring, amid a shortage of space in special education pre-K classrooms, according to a new study released Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Dermot Shea is the city’s first NYPD commissioner registered with a political party. in over 30 years. Does the Republican Shea support the president’s anti-immigration policies? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The Times Square Valentine Heart Design Competition winner was unveiled on Thursday. Heart Squared is a 125 mirror installation arranged in the shape of a heart and is in Father Duffy Square in Times Square. Check it out the next time someone tricks you into going there. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn Eagle fired four employees, their editor-in-chief Ned Berke, managing editor Sara Bosworth, reporter Meaghan McGoldrick, and growth manager Cambria Roth, in what seems to be a combination of a failed attempt to secure investment and the publisher of the company’s issues with “woke journalism.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The First National City Bank building, on the corner of Canal and Broadway, will become Mercato Fabbrica, a 35,000-square-foot Italian-style food hall, with groceries, a tea parlor, coffee house, nano-brewery, boutique, rooftop terrace, and a “culinary social club with cowering lounge”. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Using the Tessa Majors murder as a backdrop, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is calling for every school in the city to have a full-time social worker. The three suspects in the case are all teenage boys who were attending P.S. 180 in Manhattan. P.S. 180 has 500 students and until recently had only been served by a single part-time social worker. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Who better to review a Dolly Parton-themed bar than Doll Parts, a Dolly Parton cover band. (Maggie Robinson Katz and Julie Sirna-Frest for Brooklyn Paper)

In a “just when you thought it couldn’t get worse” scenario, a Brooklyn mother’s day went from “no good” to “very bad” very quickly. One of her children got sick and puked on a bus, which was taken out of service. On the street, another passenger on the bus pulled a knife and slashed her face before running off. The mother went to Brookdale Hospital for the slash. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say hello to the four new flavors at Van Leeuwen: marionberry cheesecake, Irish cream, ginger lemon poppy seed crumble, and churros & fudge. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Video: Maybe We Woke Up: The Saving of Neir’s Tavern, a six minute documentary. (Christopher Ming Ryan and Evan Fairbanks)

The NYPD is sending high ranking officers to talk to the public to scare monger against the state’s new bail reforms. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

Shakespeare in the Park announced its shows in its 2020 season: Richard II and As You Like It (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

When contemplating a cab vs a Lyft/Uber, you weight the options. The inconvenience but lower price of a cab vs the convenience and potential surge pricing of a Lyft/Uber. Throw that out the window, because a panel is set to recommend surge pricing for taxis. (NY Times)

The best meals for around $20 on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Murat for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for December 3, 2018 – The “Manhattan Apartments Are So Small…” Edition

Inside the Carnegie Deli, the real reason Amazon picked NYC, the city’s “FULL SNOW RESPONSE” is ready for the next storm, the fight over the “World’s largest” menorah and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Manhattan has the second smallest apartments in the country. At 733 square feet, they’re 22 feet larger than the ones in Seattle. The national average is 904. (The Real Deal)

Have you seen Rat Rock in Morningside Heights? Despite The New York Times calling it “one of the city’s most amazing natural wonders,” it’s not much of a sight to see. (Atlas Obscura)

In a desperate attempt to not be embarrassed by a few inches of snow, the city created something called a FULL SNOW RESPONSE for when more than two inches of snow are predicted. (Gothamist)

“Fighting” Shirley Chisholm will be honored with a monument in Prospect Park as part of the SheBuiltNYC program. Chisholm championed racial and gender equality, helping the poor, ending the Vietnam War, was the first woman to run for president on the Democratic ticket, and that’s just the start. The monument will be installed near the Parkside Ave entrance in 2020. (Curbed)

Inside The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Carnegie Deli pop-up. (Untapped Cities)

Coney Island is lit up for the holidays for the first time in decades. (Brooklyn Paper)

There’s a basement farm in Tribeca that supplies the city’s restaurants with freshly grown herbs. (Gothamist)

The first of three hearings about how the Amazon HQ2 deal came to be will take place on December 12. (6sqft)

How hard is painting a straight double yellow line? It seems like it’s harder than it seems, based on the Department of Transportation’s handiwork on Neptune Avenue. (Bklyner)

Step back 111 years with these recently colorized photo an elephant parade in Coney Island. (Viewing NYC)

Ground was broken on a $2.8 million Queens Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Elmhurst Park last week. (amNY)

Two more Proud Boys were arrested. Kyle Borello, 31, and Jake Freijo, 26, were charged with misdemeanor riot and attempted assault charges. The Proud Boys are a SPLC designated hate group and the FBI classifies it as an “extremist group with ties to white nationalism.” (Gothamist)

The Strand is fighting against landmark status. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

At least eight hospitals in the city were caught by Attorney General Barbara Underwood’s office for illegally billing sexual assault victims for rape kits. (Gothamist)

How two menorah’s that are the exact same height are fighting for the title of “world’s largest.” (6sqft)

Everything you need to know about the Times Square New Year’s Eve ball drop without actually having to go to Times Square. (StreetEasy)

12 Hannukah specials in city restaurants. (Eater)

Taxi prices will go up in January and the city is looking to level the playing field by passing legislation that forces Uber and Lyft into a comparable price hike. (NY Post)

As if things couldn’t look worse for the NYCHA, an executive’s secretary was arrested after finding 1,800 sleeves of heroin in her apartment. (NY Post)

The 23rd St F/M station has re-opened and features a set of colorful William Wegman Weimaraner mosaics. (Gothamist)

The real reason Amazon picked Long Island City for HQ2. (CityLab)

Meet the Staten Island lawyer accused of creating fake social media profiles to sway local elections. (NY Times)

The Verrazzano Bridge is already the most expensive bridge to cross in the nation before the MTA raises the price by $2 in March. (NY Post)

Are you the butterfinger who dropped your engagement ring down a grate while proposing in Times Square? The NYPD found your ring and is looking to give it back. (NY Post)

Brooklyn Bridge Park’s The Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory may be shutting down. Their license is up with the city and the city is looking for new proposals. (NY Post)

Orthodox Jewish parents have to balance their concern about a lack of a proper education their children may get at yeshivas with how they may be shunned within their own communities. (NY Post)

Watch Ryan Seacrest go on a painfully awkward pizza tour of the city. (Live with Kelly and Ryan)

After its second weekend, Winterfest continues to disappoint. Organizers sold tickets to attractions that didn’t exist, vendors have begun to pull out, and the Brooklyn Museum has publicly stated their disappointment. (NY Post)

It would seem wrong to hold the New York State Yo-Yo Contest anywhere but Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

17 comforting places to get hot pot. (Eater)

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