The Briefly for August 8, 2019 – The “Boycotting Mega Rich Trump Supporters is Messy Business” Edition

How to research apartment buildings, One World Trade’s scent, stand-out dishes in the West Village, Cuomo tries to change the gun conversation and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

How should the city’s justice system fight gun violence? The NYPD and Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez have differing opinions, and no matter how difficult it is for them to see eye-to-eye on the matter, no one can ignore that shootings are up 10% and gun arrests are up 91% in Brooklyn. (NY Times)

It was a mass panic in Times Square as people fled for safety, storming bars or theaters, literally anywhere to escape what sounded like gunshots. It was a motorcycle backfiring. (NY Times)

You might be surprised how many playgrounds are built on top of cemeteries. (Untapped Cities)

On Wednesday, the outrage machine was aimed at Stephen Ross, the billionaire behind the Hudson Yards whose company owns Equinox, who is hosting a fundraiser for President Trump this weekend to the tune of a quarter-million dollars per person. People are calling on Equinox members to cancel their memberships, but if you’re looking to boycott businesses Ross has investments in, you better make a list, because it starts with SoulCycle, Momofuku, Milk Bar, &pizza, Beyond Sushi, and Bluestone Lane before you get into the companies his company invested in. When it comes to the mega-rich, boycotting is a messy business. (Eater)

Interested in finding out who you know that donated to Trump? Here’s an easy set of instructions to follow to make family gatherings really awkward this year. (Splinter)

Now that the primary is officially over, Melinda Katz is focused on the Queens DA election. (amNY)

If we’ve learned anything from the Katz/Cabán DA primary battle, it is that all votes count in NYC and everyone has to be extremely careful to make sure they fill out their ballots, affidavit or not, properly. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is attempting to shape the Democratic Primary by asking all candidates to endorse a list of gun reforms including banning assault weapons, creating a database to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing weapons, expanding buybacks, and “red flag” legislation that would allow individuals to seek court orders preventing others from buying guns. (Politico)

After a brief suspension, @placardabuse is back on Twitter, documenting all the different ways that cars with parking placards regularly abuse the privileges their placards may grant them. (Streetsblog)

12 stand-out dishes to try in the West Village. (Eater)

Where does the water go when you flush? Easy question, complex answer. (amNY)

One World Trade’s observatory has a scent, and it’s there on purpose. (NY Times)

How to research a building before you move in. You don’t want the reason that two-bedroom apartment is cheap to be because of the awful history of bedbug infestations. (Curbed)

An interview with State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, Brooklyn’s last standing elected Republican. She’s running for Congress to try to unseat Max Rose, possibly leaving the entire borough solidly blue in the process. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Sunshine Cinema building on the Lower East Side has been completely demolished. (Curbed)

The woman who was arrested and had her one-year-old son pulled out of her hands for sitting on the floor at a benefits office has, as expected, sued the city, the officers involved, the HRA and the NYPD. (Politico)

The city’s taxi regulators voted to approve the cap on ride-hailing app vehicles and limited how long drivers can wait for fares in Manhattan. In six months, the commission will evaluate if they should issue new licenses. (Patch)

Finding a pool table at a bar is getting more and rarer, but the tables are far from gone. (amNY)

Last week a judge recommended Daniel Pantaleo be fired for using an illegal chokehold that lead to Eric Garner’s death. One week later the protests have begun as the mayor has remained silent and the city waits for action from commissioner James O’Neill. (amNY)

The DOT announced a speed-up in the timeline for installing protected bike lanes on 4th Ave in Brooklyn, connecting Bay Ridge to Park Slope and will do so by the end of this year. While the city will never get Em Samolewicz back after she was killed by a driver in Sunset Park, her death isn’t going without action from the city to protect other cyclists from meeting the same fate. (Curbed)

A fund to honor Em at Third Root Community Health Center is being established that will welcome trans women & trans femmes to receive healing services from Third Root at no cost. Em was an admin staff member since 2016. (GoFundMe)

A farm? On Staten Island? Yes, and it’s part of the amenities. (The Real Deal)

Raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers hasn’t hurt the restaurant industry as a whole, despite protests to the contrary every time it’s proposed. (amNY)

A group of rent-stabilized tenants in the Lower East Side and Williamsburg are accusing their landlord of continuing with eviction harassment, illegal overcharges, and preferential rent hikes—despite New York’s recently passed rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

Thousands of children, parents and staff members from the Harlem Children’s Zone marched in this year’s Children’s March for Peace. The match started after an elementary school girl was hit with a stray bullet inside her apartment 25 years ago and with the recent rise in gun violence across the city and country, its message is needed more than ever. (amNY)

The mayor announced $9 million to revitalize social services in Brownsville in response to the recent mass shooting for anti-gun violence programs, to enhance response times from the Brooklyn Action Center, youth education programs, to hire more staff for the recreation center, and more. Last week Jumaane Williams called for more funding and not police to address future problems in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 12 hottest lunch spots right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for May 20, 2019 – The “Casting Literal and Figurative Shade” Edition

A legendary pizza place is temporarily closed, Scott Stringer is making his mayoral candidacy clear, the NYPL’s secrets, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are along the 3, 6, A, D and E lines, but double check before you go anywhere after 10pm. (Subway Weekender)

The BQE Rehab panel is asking for feedback. If you want to provide your feedback, there’s a phone number and a form for the kind of constructive, polite feedback New Yorkers are known for. (BQE Panel)

The developer of the building that would cast literal shade on the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is attempting a char offensive campaign to promote the site’s affordable housing. I’m not sure there’s a New Yorker gullible enough to believe that a company would pay $75 million for a plot of land and then build 1,500 apartments (50% would be “affordable”) because they believe in affordable housing. (Gothamist)

From the pneumatic tubes, to the book train, to the actual visible history you can see in the building, ten secrets of the NYPL’s main branch on 42nd St. (Untapped Cities)

Not on the list is the number of empty floors of stacks. There are some parts of the NYPL that can’t safely store its research collection, which has been moved into storage underneath Bryant Park, where its 11 million book collection is safe. (NY Times)

Wave hello to the city’s newest bars and restaurants. (amNY)

The restaurants ordered closed last week, including surprising inclusions Barcade on 24th and Di Fara Pizza in Midwood. (Patch)

Di Fara says it will be reopening today. (Eater)

If you need more proof that the MTA wasn’t prepared for the L Train Slowdown, the initial cuts to the M14’s route have been altered with this “final compromise.” (Curbed)

35 years after opening, Bookbook in Greenwich Village is closing. It’s not the city’s rising rents, but retirement that’s calling the owners. (NY Times)

This Gothamist piece about a protest from contractors over the proposed rent reforms takes a turn midway through, accusing real estate and landlord groups of astroturfing the hearings. (Gothamist)

630 Fifth Avenue. Quickly, what’s the nearest corner? Take off the last number and you’ve got 63. Divide it by 2 and you have 31. Add 20 because it’s over 600 and the answer is 51st St. Finding a cross street used to involve a little math. (Ephemeral New York)

The city lost 7,500 affordable apartments in 2018, but gained 11,800. There’s a catch. 80% of the new apartments’ affordability status is temporary. (The Real Deal)

Brooklyn’s bra whisperer. (NY City Lens)

The Bronx’s Tibbetts Brook was “moved” underground by Robert Moses. As a result of Robert Moses’s brilliant idea, the surrounding area floods when it rains, the flooding overwhelms the sewers and overflow has to be dumped into the Harlem River. The Parks Department has a plan to bring the brook back above ground to remedy this, but a private rail company stands in their way. (Gothamist)

If you’re unfamiliar with the Combined Sewage Overflow system, the city collects rainwater in its sewer system, and when the combination of rainwater, human waste, and whatever else on the street overload the sewer system, it dumps out in the NYC waters in 13 locations, dumping 377 million gallons of raw sewage into our waters. (Newsweek)

This is why the city closely monitors the water at the city’s beaches for sewage runoff. Beaches were on warning for 49 days in 2018 with one closure. The Swim Guide and website is also available for water condition reports. (nyc.gov and The Brooklyn Eagle)

Notify NYC now offers transit alerts. Why would you want transit alerts from the Department of Emergency Management, a city agency, instead of the MTA, a state agency, or one of the dozens of transit apps? No idea. A quick look shows that the Notify system doesn’t have the same breadth of coverage as @NYCTsubway on twitter. (amNY)

It shouldn’t be to anyone’s surprise at the width of the chasm of difference between the rezoning plans of the Department of City Planning and the Bushwick Community Plan for Bushwick’s future. (Bklyner)

Normal people put up curtains or shades in their bathrooms so people can’t watch them poop. Alex Rodriguez does not appear to be a normal person, or else this photo of A-Rod taking a deuce wouldn’t be on the internet. (Gothamist)

Morgenstern’s is adding a twist to its flagship ice cream location on Houston: booze. (Eater)

The most popular baby names in NYC are Liam, Noah, Jacob, Emma, and Olivia. Not many future kinds named Bran. (Patch)

Turns out the TWA hotel wasn’t actually as ready for visitors like it should have been. (Gothamist)

If you want to attract birds, here are the plants for you to grow. (Patch)

. Turns out the MTA is as good at maintaining its toilets as it is its subways. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard ferry stop opens today. (Brooklyn Paper)

Scott Stringer, who has clearly been making a visibility play to run for mayor, says a new tax on the city’s largest businesses could expand subsidies for childcare for 84,000 kids younger than 3. (Patch)

The best cocktails under $10. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for May 9, 2019 – The “Is This Where They Dump the Bodies on Law & Order?” Edition

The NYPD’s use of chokeholds continues, there has been no state movement on legal marijuana, a boozy Taco Bell in the West Village, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The City Council pass a legislative package with 17 bills aimed at protecting tenants’ rights. (amNY)

The hunt for the city’s best cheesecake. (Grub Street)

We are six weeks away from the second 2019 deadline for the state’s legislature to do something about legalizing recreational marijuana. In order to make it work, the governor is going to have to start throwing his weight around. (Gothamist)

New York is often shaped in the minds of visitors by the shows and movies that portray it. From the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to Seinfeld to Law and Order, every non-New Yorker’s New York is an imaginary city. (Curbed)

The life of a polyamourous Hasidic swordfighter in, yes, how did you know, Bushwick. (Bushwick)

The top 10 secrets of Barnard College. (Untaped Cities)

“All of the pre-made food looks so sad.” The reviews of the city’s Amazon Go store are in. (Gothamist)

The NYPD spent $35 million trying to retrain officers after Eric Garner died a chokehold. Record show that chokeholds are still being used by NYPD officers, very few face discipline, some have lost vacation time, and none have been fired. (NY Times)

Is the West Village ready for a boozy Taco Bell? (Commercial Observer)

Don’t pet the dog. All the things you’ve never asked commuters with service dogs and what they want you to know. (Gothamist)

M & S Schmalberg, the makers of silk flowers for over a century, gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

The Prospect Park Perimeter is getting a new bike lane along Ocean Ave. (6sqft)

On an intersection, just one block from the Brooklyn Museum, the rats have begun a hostile takeover. (Gothamist)

28 portraits of this year’s Tony nominees. (NY Times)

176 pounds of cocaine was seized, worth nearly $3 million, in the city’s recent drug bust that resulted in 19 arrests. (Patch)

In New York State, you can be arrested for not paying a parking ticket, which becomes part of your criminal record. State lawmakers are looking to change that. (NY Times)

No keys? No way. Hell’s Kitchen tenants sued and won the rights to have physical keys for their apartments after a landlord installed a keyless entry system that they claimed violated their right to privacy. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wondered but have been too scared to ask where the Museum Mile is or what’s a part of it, this Miracle Mile guide is your answer. (NYCGo)

New York City is the second worst place to work if you don’t have at least a bachelor’s degree. (Patch)

In praise of the ten-egg breakfast. (Grub Street)

The New York Times reviews The Met’s ‘Camp,’ calling it “Frustrating.” (NY Times)

The city is looking at banning “ghost” guns. Not the Ghostbusters’ proton packs, but gun frames to which other components attach to. They lack serial numbers, don’t require background checks and would allow you to build an untraceable gun. (Gothamist)

From Fox and Friends to Famiglia Pizza: The lowlights of NYC: Donald Trump’s New York. (Huff Post)

13 places to have post afternoon tea in NYC. (Eater)

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