The Briefly for June 24, 2020 – The “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The possible end of the to-go cocktail, fighting white supremacy in museums, Ample Hills finds a buyer, the City Council move to open beaches, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 83˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Tired of waiting for the mayor, the City Council is set to introduce a bill this week that would force the beaches open. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Last night’s primary and election results. It’s still too early to declare winners due to the high volume of absentee voting, but Donovan Richards is leading for Queens Borough President, Jamaal Bowman has a sizable lead over incumbent Eliot Engel, Ritchie Torres is leading the pack in House District 15, AOC is cruising to victory, Yvette Clarke has a large lead, and Jerry Nadler is winning. (NY1)

How did the Democratic primary and election go yesterday?

Over 229,806 absentee ballots distributed in Manhattan for the Democratic primary, only 13% had been received before June 23. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Mayor de Blasio is tackling the city’s biggest problem. Obviously, that problem is Alternate Side Parking. For some reason, the mayor is making ASP more difficult to understand, only demanding that cars be moved once a week instead of multiple times. Of course, this doesn’t apply on streets where cars are only moved once a week. If this sounds complicated, it’s because the mayor took a subject that only pertains to 45% of households in the city and made it complicated. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Kudos to the people who chose to protest the mayor’s inaction on the amount of fireworks regularly being set off by sitting outside Gracie Mansion all night while laying on car horns. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where are the illegal fireworks? Take a look at a map of the ballooning complaints across the city through the month of June. (Sydney Pereira, Clarisa Diaz, Jen Chung, Jake Dobkin, and Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

The mayor announced a crack down on fireworks, but don’t expect any relief on the nightly displays across the city. The mayor’s approach is mostly supply chain based and not enforcement based. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, this may be the king. The mayor announced that instead of a July 4th fireworks display, Macy’s will set off fireworks for five minutes, unannounced, on a nightly basis for every night next week and a highlights package will air on July 4th. This is the literal plot of the 30 Rock episode “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” and it ends poorly. This truly is the Mayor de Blasio of fireworks displays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Layleen Polanco, the trans woman who died in a Rikers Island solitary confinement cell last year, was pushed there by jailers over a doctor’s objections and despite her seizure disorder, according to a new report from thecdty’s Board of Corrections. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The complaint history of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold caused the death of Eric Garner, has been released and, surprise surprise, Daniel Panteleo was a piece of shit with seven misconduct complaints before using an illegal chokehold on Garner in 2014. (NY1)

The NYPD Tasered George Zapantis to death. Video was taken of Zapantis being taken from his home with hands tied behind his back has surfaced while four or five officers tased him and screamed at him not to resist arrest. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

The city’s criminal courts have a 39,200 case backlog right. The city’s justice is on hold and people waiting for trial are sitting in jail cells. (Alan Feuer, Nicole Hong, Benjamin Weiser and Jan Ransom for The City)

Museums can open their doors, if all goes according to plan, on July 20. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has plans to open on August 29. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

The Met Breuer will be closing for good in July, with The Frick moving in while its home on the Upper East Side gets renovated. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Museum of Jewish Heritage is laying off over 40% of its staff due to the Covid-19 pandemic. (Colin Moynihan for NY Times)

“We write to inform you that your covert and overt white supremacy that has benefited the institution, through the unrecognized dedication and hard labor of Black/Brown employees, with the expectation that we remain complacent with the status quo, is over.”
An open letter to New York City’s Cultural Institutions

A look at the heroic efforts of the people who step in to help the pets of New Yorkers who become seriously ill with coronavirus. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Over a quarter-million of the city’s food jobs were lost since March, with only about 14,000 returning to work so far. It’s the lowest level of hospitality employment since before 1992. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The city’s cocktail-takeout law expires this weekend. Without action from Governor Cuomo, this is the end of the to-go cocktail. (Erika Adams for Eater)

There are only two kinds of people in the world, according to Serena Day, those who like Van Leeuwen and those who like Ample Hills. Which are you? (Serena Day for Eater)

Ample Hills was sold to Schmitt Industries for one million dollars. They were the only company to submit a qualifying bid. Technically the sale is pending with a court hearing set for June 30. (Erika Adams for Eater)

85 restaurants where you can eat outside today. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 11, 2020 – The “Brokers’ Fees Are Unbanned” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The subway mascot Cardvaark, the hottest restaurants in Queens, a sleepover at IKEA, the plastic bag ban, an Oreo slide, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.

Congrats to the Barclays Center subway stop, which has the city’s worst privately owned subway elevator functioning for only 74.2% of 2019, out of service for a total of three months of the year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Video: Go behind the scenes and back in time with this Metropolitan Museum of Art behind the scenes tour from 1928. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Remember when brokers’ fees were banned? Brokers’ fees have been unbanned, temporarily at least. The Real Estate Board of New York sued the state and the judge put a temporary restraining order on the rule. Snip snap. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hulu is taking over Rough Trade this weekend in an installation to promote the new Hulu version of High Fidelity. (Grant Lancaster for amNewyork Metro)

New York is the ninth most dangerous state for online dating, which takes into account internet crime rates and STI transmission rates. The safest site for online dating is Maine and the most dangerous is Alaska, which has the country’s highest man to woman ratio. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best bars on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aldea, which arrives a Michelin star, is closing on February 22. Chef George Mendes cites plans to “take a break, recharge creatively, and refocus,” with no other reason given for the closure. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Pizza Rat won Gothamist’s poll for the new subway mascot, but let’s not forget the subway’s previous mascot, Cardvaark, who looks like everyone’s least coolest cousin wearing a homemade Halloween outfit, who was supposed to help us all transition from tokens to MetroCards. Fun fact, the same person who brought us Cardvaark also brought us Poetry in Motion. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, so you’re moving from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Here are 19 answers to common questions. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

The NYPD is reporting 2019 saw the first rise in the number of Stop and Frisks since 2013, up 22% from 2018. An NYPD spokesperson, who must think that we’re all stupid, said that it’s “unlikely to be a true increase in stops but rather more accurate and complete reporting.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

With a history of racist and victim-blaming comments, does the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s Ed Mullins really speak for the actual NYPD? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

Take a deep breath in and release that tension in your body. The Yankees have reported for spring training, which means actual spring is coming. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Everything you need to know about NYC’s citywide ferry. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban, which kicks into gear in less than three weeks. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Manhattan’s community boards are older than the borough’s population, homeowners hold a disproportionately high number of seats and Hispanic people are underrepresented. Not a great representation. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Ann Choi for The City)

Oreo is building a giant inflatable slide in Herald Square that will open February 21st, so when you’re in Herald Square and your friends see the slide and ask what it is, you can look effortlessly cool by telling them “Oreo put it up.” (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted to sleep in the Red Hook IKEA, here’s your chance. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

After an ICE agent shot Eric Diaz in the face, it’s time to ask if New York City really a sanctuary city? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

The Reckless Driver Accountability Act will require drivers who rack up five red light tickets or 15 school speed zone violations within a one year period to take a safe driving course or they’ll lose their car until they do. The bill is expected to pass City Council this week. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Cupid’s Undie Run, kind of like a street version of the No Pants Subway Ride but for charity, hit the streets last weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Video: ‘Commute’ by Scott Lazer is a beautiful film, shot on 16mm, even if it’s focused on Penn Station in rush hour. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

1 Dot = 1 Person. Explore how racially divided the city is using 2010 census data. (Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service)

Feds to the Hudson River rail tunnel: Drop Dead. (Ryan Hutchins for Politico)

Another day, another water main break. This time the water main on South Street near Pike Slio broke, flooding the area. (Bowery Boogie)

R40, La Rotisserie du Coin, La Mian Lounge join the hottest restaurants in Queens.

Featured photo sent in from reader @mfireup