The Briefly for June 12, 2019 – The “You’re A Landmark if You Like It or Not” Edition

The state’s legislature agreed to rent reforms, the best restaurants of 2019 so far, Cuomo gets serious about MTA overtime, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The state legislature agreed on a package of bills aimed at strengthening tenants rights and rent laws. The bills also would become permanent, so no more regular lobbying from the real estate industry to let the laws lapse when their expiration dates come. (NY Times)

Some of the rent reforms include ending vacancy decontrol, eliminating the ability of landlords to raise rents on vacancies, it would retain preferential rents for the life of a tenant, and dramatically limit improvement charges. (Politico)

Cool down with a look at the ice creams of Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

The Strand Bookstore is now a city landmark and as you might expect, despite a long campaign from owner Nancy Wyden against the idea. (Gothamist)

“My friend later told me that most of the businesses in this area dealt in cash only…so guns were pretty much everywhere…in every store.” New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Your regular reminder that you can check the city’s beaches for too much poop (how much poop is too much?) on the internet. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wanted to live in the Waldorf Astoria (and have more money than you know what to do with), the condos will be hitting the market this fall. (Curbed)

New York is the third most fun state in the country, behind Florida and California. The thing holding it back? It’s not the ratpocalypse or the mountains of trash on the sidewalks, it’s the high costs. (Patch)

Hundreds rallied after the death of Layleen Polanco in Rikers Island last week. She was being held and her bail was set at $500. The city is looking into the case, where she was sent into solitary confinement despite a history of seizures. (Gothamist)

Catch a sneak peek at NYC’s largest rainbow “flag”. (HuffPost)

The helicopter pilot who crashed into a building on Monday was lost in the rain and fog. Investigators are looking into how the craft ended up where it did instead of an airport in New Jersey. (NY Times)

FAA officials said that Timothy McCormack did not have the proper license to be operating the helicopter in low-visibility conditions. (HuffPost)

Congressmember Carolyn Maloney wants to ban all nonessential helicopter flights from Manhattan. The city banned rooftop helicopter landings after a 1977 crash on the roof of the MetLife building. (The Villager)

In the 1977 crash, five people were killed when an idling helicopter tipped over, four were on the roof, one was on the street below. (Gothamist)

The High Line’s final section is open. The Spur is the home of the High Line Plinth, a site dedicated to a rotating series of artists. (6sqft)

Watch the complete debate for Queens DA. (NY1)

During the debate, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz was the favored punching bag of the seven candidates. (Politico)

We could be seeing the beginning of the end of the measles epidemic in Brooklyn. Everyone celebrate by making sure you’re vaccinated. (amNY)

New York state is one of three that doesn’t allow paid surrogacy, but even with a progressive legislature, it isn’t certain to be abolished. Abolishment of the prohibition has the governor’s support and a bill passed the state senate, but it is stalled in the assembly, where it has split progressive support. (NY Times)

The “Flower Flashes” by Lewis Miller Design might be the city’s most wholesome vandalism the city has ever seen. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo plans on hiring the former federal prosecutor that convicted former Speaker of the State Assembly, Sheldon Siver, to investigate a former federal prosecutor to look into the overtime issue plaguing the MTA. (Politico)

Remember that T-Mobile/Spring merger? New York is suing to block it from happening. (Patch)

Riverside Park is getting a new skate park at 108th St. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Riverside at W 108th has a history as a skatepark. The Riverside Skate Park was the first “solid” skate park in the city, originally built by NYC skateboarding pioneer Andy Kessler. This piece in the Times from 2013 shows the history of the community’s dedication to maintaining it in honor of Kessler’s vision. (NY Times)

A guide to the pizza ovens of Brooklyn, illustrated by Koren Shadmi. (NY Times)

Jon Stewart, the conscience of New Yorkers, took to Congress on Tuesday to rightfully shame our government for not fully funding the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund. (Patch)

John Jay College is being sued by students who allege the college botched sexual misconduct allegations against four professors, called “The Swamp.” (Patch)

The best restaurants of 2019 so far, according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema. (Eater)

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The Briefly for February 20, 2019 – The “Corporation Hunting Season Has Officially Begun” Edition

The hero/villain screaming obscenities at pre-K kids, Diddy(‘s wax statue) decapitated, raccoons take over a Canarsie subway station, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

Today’s forecast is snow followed by rain and 50˚ on Thursday. (NY Post)

How to watch tonight’s Public Advocate debate. There are seven candidates in tonight’s debate, but 17 candidates will be on the ballot. Tonight’s debaters are State Assemblyman Michael Blake, City Councilman Rafael Eespinal, State Assemblyman Ron Kim, journalist and activist Nomiki Konst, former City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, former Obama staffer Dawn Smalls, and City Councilman Jumaane Williams. (Patch)

Is Uber the city’s next target after beating back Amazon? (NY Times)

They’re the kings of the dollar slice, but at Upside Pizza they’re looking to prove that they can create a respectable pizza. (NY Times)

A look at the Hudson Yards, a “billionaire’s fantasy city.” (New York Magazine)

10 secrets of Fordham University. (Untapped Cities)

All hail the subway bully kitten! (Gothamist)

Someone hates Diddy enough to decapitate his wax statue at Madame Tussauds. (Pitchfork)

How Greenpoint became a dining hot spot. (amNY)

There are 200,000 fire escapes in the city, and each one has to be inspected every five years. (StreetEasy)

The NYPD wants to play Duck Hunt with unauthorized drones over the city’s skies. (Gothamist)

Employers in the city had to be reminded that banning dreadlocks is not only racist, but it’s also illegal. (Patch)

The Staten Island Levee was unveiled by the governor, mayor, Chuck Schumer, and Congressman Max Rose. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will build a 5.3 mile and $615 million sea wall that is scheduled to break ground in 2020 and be completed in 2024. (6sqft)

Lynne Patton, President Trump’s regional administrator at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, had to be rescued by the FDNY after being trapped in an elevator in an Upper West Side NYCHA building while she’s in the middle of her four week publicity stunt to live in NYCHA buildings. (Gothamist)

Last night was the first night of a cutoff of late night B and D service for the next three weeks in the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Trash pandas have taken over the East 105th Street station on the L. Maybe they’ll take over the late night construction too. (NY Post)

The Strand hit the third stage of grief and has begun openly bargaining with the Landmarks Commission in an attempt to avoid landmark status. (Gothamist)

A state appeals court ruled against the police union that NYPD body cam footage is public and should be readily available to the public. (CNN)

[CORRECTED LINK] The Lams are a Chinese-American family living in a 350 square-foot apartment in Chinatown. Photographer Thomas Holton has been documenting their lives in photographs for the last fifteen years. (Gothamist)

Downtown Manhattan rents hit $3,724, an all-time high for January. (StreetEasy)

Is this Sunnyside woman a hero or villain for screaming at pre-kindergarteners to, and this is the quote, “shut the fuck up” during recess? (Gothamist)

The five weirdest tombs and mausoleums at Green-Wood Cemetery. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat near Union Square. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 5, 2019 – The “Goose-Related Subway Delays” Edition

A possible CBD ban, State Senator Michael Gianaris could end the Amazon HQ2 deal, State of the Union protests, the hardest job in NYC, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at two of the State of the Union protests planned across the city. (amNY)

There were some goose-related delays on the Q train on Monday afternoon. (NY Post)

The 9/11 Memorial & Museum will add a section in May dedicated to people who died or became ill with 9/11-related illnesses. (Curbed)

10x TONY award winning “The Band’s Visit” will end its Broadway run on April 7. (NY Times)

The state saw an unplanned $2.3 billion drop in income tax revenue, which will force the state to curb spending. In some parts of the city, that’s called an “Amazon sized hole.” (NY Post)

New York City’s lack of cash crops ended slavery. In 1790, African Americans accounted for over 30% of Brooklyn’s population and most were enslaved. (Greenpointers)

10 new art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Hope. Love. Utopian. Finding optimism on city streets. (6sqft)

A rundown of the wave of laws that followed new blue wave in the state’s legislature. (NY Times)

A 72-year-old cyclist was killed in a hit-and-run while riding in the bike lane on Eight Avenue at 45th St. It was the second cyclist death in three days. (Gothamist)

The state’s Public Authorities Control Board isn’t well known, but it could kill the Amazon HQ2 deal. The state senate appointed the anti-Amazon Senator Michael Gianaris to sit on the board, of which any of the three members can veto the project. (The Real Deal)

Get your CBD-infused food and drinks now, because the Department of Health may be banning its use as a food additive. (Eater)

Jennifer Irigoyen, 35-year-old real estate agent and fitness instructor, was stabbed to death in her Ridgewood apartment building around 1am on Sunday night. Irigoyen a was five months pregnant and no arrests have been made. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit calls the conditions at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are a “a humanitarian crisis,” according to a lawsuit filed by the Federal Defenders of New York. (Gothamist)

The arguments for and against landmarking the Strand Bookstore. (West View News)

The city is moving to fire the security officer who pulled Jazmine Headley’s 1-year-old son from her arms at a Brooklyn benefits center in December of last year. A second officer has resigned. (NY Post)

Clothing and accessories by cat people for cat people to promote feral cat awareness. Yes, they’re in Bushwick. How’d you know? (Bushwick Daily)

A man with MS-13 affiliations was arrested in connection to the shooting on the 90th St-Elmhurst Avenue 7 train platform. (NY Times)

The City Council is considering a foie gras ban. (Gothamist)

Is Netflix’s “Russian Doll” an allegory for Tompkins Square Park? (Gothamist)

After the first day of deliberations, the jury has not come to a verdict in El Chapo’s trial on day one. (amNY)

A 16-year-old 92nd Street Y camp counselor says she was blacklisted after she accused an older counselor of sexual assault. (NY Post)

If you thought your job was hard, meet Pete Tomlin. As NYC Transit’s new modern signal chief, Tomlin is responsible for modernizing 90% of the subway’s signals. Good luck Pete, you’ll need it. (amNY)

15 restaurants that “feel like Japan.” (Eater)

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