The Briefly for August 24, 2020 – The “One Thing the Pandemic Can’t Stop” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The eviction moratorium is extended, teachers fight back against starting school, the city sued over indoor dining, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

Do not wait. Click here to apply for your absentee ballot today. Everyone in the city can apply.

The Times lays out why an antibody test and its results are useless if you want to know if you’ve ever had Covid-19 or if you can’t get it again. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

Here comes the fall foliage, the greatest show in New York City this fall. Also, it’s the only show in New York City this fall. Here are some spots to check out the fall foliage. (Katrina Makayan for New York Family)

Of all the things that the Covid-19 pandemic has taken away from New York, but the $2 billion AirTrain to LGA isn’t one of those things, as the FAA’s draft Environmental Impact Study concludes it “best meets the stated Purpose and Need.” (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Even Governor Cuomo wouldn’t give an answer when asked if he has school-age kids if he would send them back to NYC schools. Classes start on September 10. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Last week teachers rallied at Grand Army Plaza against reopening the city’s schools, citing unsafe conditions, a lack of a comprehensive testing program, and decades of neglect of the buildings themselves. (Emily Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Can the city force teachers back into classrooms if teachers feel the classrooms are unsafe? The teacher’s union has begun gauging support for a strike over school reopening plans. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The subways will continue to stay shut down overnight, but the MTA is ending its program that gave free cab rides to stranded late-night essential workers. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Steiner Studios announced plans to build a 500,000-square-foot production facility on the waterfront in Sunset Park (less than a mile south of Industry City). This is a part of the city’s “Made in NY Campus,” which the mayor announced in his last “State of the City” speech, which is supposed to offer “more attractive rents than private property owners.” The city is contributing $15 million to construction costs. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

The ACLU has released data on complaints against over 81,000 current or former NYPD officers after the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the stay which blocked them from releasing the information. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database. (New York Civil Liberties Union)

It’s been four months since Francisco Garcia, an officer with a history of misconduct complaints and lawsuits and was caught on video beating a bystander and kneeling on his head while “enforcing” social distancing on the Lower East Side. It was one of the early indications that the NYPD would treat social distance enforcement like Stop And Frisk. According to the NYPD, the disciplinary process is “ongoing.” (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A look at Crocheron Park in Bayside. At a time when the city’s parks have never been more valuable, Crocheron Park has never looked worse. (Queens Crap)

The Brooklyn Museum will reopen to the public on September 12 and the Brooklyn Aquarium will be reopening on August 27. Like everything else in life in 2020, there will be new restrictions. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

All New York evictions are suspended until October 1 thanks to a ruling from the Office of Court Administration. Advocates are calling for an indefinite moratorium and landlords’ attorneys want to start evicting people yesterday. (Isaac Scher for Bushwick Daily)

As more and more types of businesses reopen, Coney Island is left behind. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

It’s hard not to make the NYU-Fyre Fest comparison with students sharing what the “meals” the school has served them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A lawsuit against New York’s statewide plastic bag ban was struck down by the state Supreme Court. The Bodega Association and plastic bag manufacturers brought the lawsuit. Nice to see this finally come to an end (for now). (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Following the city’s July 4th celebration, the de Blasio administration is working with Macy’s to ruin the Thanksgiving day Parade in similar fashion. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city has no plans to reinstate indoor dining and 100 restauranteurs announced plans to sue the city to allow indoor dining in a reduced capacity. Outdoor dining is set to expire for the year on October 31. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Following Governor Cuomo’s “alcohol must be ordered with a substantial amount of food” is having an effect, causing the closure of the cocktail bar Mister Paradise in the East Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The State Liquor Authority has banned any advertised or ticketed music, karaoke, or other forms of live entertainment at bars and restaurants. This one is personal for me. I have been hosting socially distanced trivia since the start of July in an outdoor venue where every rule the state has implemented was strictly followed. It was free to attend, but we advertised it regularly. Is trivia entertainment? Depends on who you ask, but as of now, we have to stop. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has spoken about this coming winter. “Snowfall will be greater than normal in the Northeast.” Go to hell, Old Farmer’s Almanac. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The New York Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit challenging the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, a multi-year effort to overhaul a stretch of the Lower East Side’s shore to protect the area from future flooding and storms. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

There will be a TONY award ceremony for the abbreviated 2019-2020 season. The show will take place this fall and it will be, of course, virtual. Broadway is currently closed through January 3, 2021, at the earliest. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Streetsblog asks a solid question: Why the hell are the double-decker tour buses still operating around the city? (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

11 inexpensive Times Square restaurants for takeout and outdoor dining. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for August 5, 2020 – The “Everyone is Abandoning de Blasio’s Ship” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city unveils its blended school plans, a wave of evictions looms, a Krispy Kreme opens in Harlem, new restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Yesterday we looked at the most expensive zip codes in the city (East and Greenwich Village, Tribeca), but let’s look at the six most affordable neighborhoods in Manhattan. Yes, all of them are north of 14th St. If not for Murray Hill/Kips Bay, they’d all be north of 86th. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Mayor de Blasio said the NYPD is withdrawing from the scores of streets and sidewalks around station houses that it seized during recent Black Lives Matter protests — but no one has seen evidence of this year. Once again the mayor is paying deference to the police department instead of leading the city. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

The absolute biggest story developing this week is the resignation of Dr. Oxiris Barbot. From Mayor de Blasio’s comments, it appears she was pushed out and he would not say if she was asked to leave. Firing your health commissioner in the middle of a pandemic? That screams “stable leadership.” In yesterday’s edition, I linked to a story about six staff resignations because of the mayor’s stance with the NYPD. It was Dr. Barbot’s letter notes that she leaves with “deep disappointment” that the health department’s expertise wasn’t used to the degree it could have been. It was back in March where stories broke of the mayor’s staff threatening resignations over his mishandling of Covid-19 in the early days in the city. Now, we’re here. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Photos: Jennifer Lawrence’s Upper East Side penthouse sold for a $6 million loss. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

In the face of a possible 90% of music venues being forced to permanently shut down due to the pandemic, say hello to the New York Independent Venue Association, an affiliate of the National Independent Venue Association, who have been pushing the passage of the Save Our Stages Act and the Restart Act. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Not everything is bad all the time, a new Krispy Kreme opened on W 125th St on Tuesday! (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The second wave of the pandemic in New York may not be medical in nature, but a wave of one million evictions that could be filed in the next four months, 12 times the average. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

To fight evictions, when all else has failed, some New Yorkers are turning to the Depression-era tactic to stay in their homes of community protest and public shaming of landlords. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Can the cutlet sandwich be rehabilitated? That’s the goal of Cutlets Sandwich Co. I didn’t know it needed help? Especially after the year the chicken parm had last year. (Rob Patronite for Grub Street)

You can now rent your own mini-“lawn” on the rooftop at South Street Seaport for lawn games, live DJ sets, and movies shown on the 32′ LED screen. Never underestimate the adaptability of a business that wants to make money. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Christmas Spectacular at Rockefeller Center is canceled for the first time in its 87 years. (Julia Carmel for NY Times)

There was a building collapse on Bedford Ave in Williamburg on Tuesday amid all the wind and storms, but there were no reported injuries. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

File under “Look at these assholes.” There are party promoters still throwing nightclub parties in venues across the city for wealthy idiots. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A man sitting in his car in Queens was killed by a falling tree as a result of Tropical Storm Isaias on Tuesday, which hit the city with Hurricane Sandy-level winds. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Department of Education released a partial plan for blended learning in city schools. The department says the same standards will apply to blended and remote learning. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Students who don’t comply with requirements to wear masks in schools will be sent home and barred from in-person learning according to Chancellor Richard Carranza. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

After six weeks, Ritchie Torres and Representative Carolyn B. Maloney have been declared winners in their respective Democratic congressional primaries. (Jesse McKinley, Shane Goldmacher and Matt Stevens for NY Times)

New restaurant openings for August. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 29, 2020 – The “11% of NYPD Officers Have a Record of Misconduct” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning is dead, Revel is on pause, where to eat in Chinatown, Trash Panda Park, Cuomo fights for control over the city, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Clear throughout the day.

Governor Cuomo is expanding his oversight on the city and its finances via three nominations to the seven-member Financial Control Board, which has oversight over the city’s budget. He’s nominated allies to the board and stated he’s looking to scrutinize the city’s fiscal outlook. Other board members are State Comptroller Tom Napoli, Mayor de Blasio, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and Governor Cuomo. (Zack Fink for NY1)

While Governor Cuomo is fighting to hold more control over the city, the State Legislature is fighting to take control away from Governor Cuomo, seeking to limit his power over the state’s budget. The Budget Equality Act, which hasn’t been voted on yet, would allow the legislature to add to the budget in addition to its powers right now, which only allow a reduction in spending. A change would require an amendment to the state’s constitution, so this will become a multi-year fight. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: It has a 1,000 bottle wine room, a 1,200 square-foot terrace, an outdoor kitchen, and 6,400 square feet of space. All yours in Tribeca for the low, low price of $17.5 million. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

After two recent deaths, Revel has indefinitely suspended its service and review its safety measures in the city. The mayor called this “an unacceptable state of affairs.” Just imagine what he could actually get accomplished if the mayor stepped in when a system within the city is obviously broken and causing pain and suffering on a wide-spread basis. It should be noted that Revel has operated since 2018 and these two are the first reported deaths. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

1 out of ever 9 NYPD officers has a confirmed record of misconduct.3,796 out of 36,000 have at least one substantiated complaint against them. Most have received no penalty at all. (Christopher Robbins, George Joseph, Jake Offenhartz, Zach Gottehrer-Cohen, and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Unsatisfied that Portland get all the country’s attention for people being grabbed off the street, the NYPD has decided to get in on the action. NYPD officers grabbed 18-year-old Nikki Stone tossing her into an unmarked Kia minivan. Reports indicate she’s since been released. (Allyson Chiu for The Washington Post)

91 percent of public drinking tickets in the last six months went to Black and Latinx New Yorkers. Is anyone surprised? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

“With the Senate back in Washington working on another COVID-19 relief package, we at the MTA are fending off a fiscal tsunami. We’re simply trying to survive the rest of this year, and the next one, with our finances mostly intact. But to do that, we need help and we need it now – in the form of another $4 billion in federal aid to get through 2020.”
-Patrick Foye, Chairman and CEO of the MTA, MTA fiscal tsunami requires federal relief for Bronx Times

A little look at NYC’s history using augmented reality. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The history of animals in Central Park from the goat-drawn carriages to Hattie the snowplow elephant to the camels that helped plow the soil for planting. (Sam Neubauer for I Love The Upper West Side)

The city has suspended its brown bin composting program, but the LES Ecology Center is rolling out a phased reopening of food scrap drop-off sites with a few sites accepting scraps. (Tequila Minsky for amNewYork Metro)

The Yankees’ second game in two days was postponed while MLB tries to come to grips with the outbreak in the Marlins’ locker room. (Joe Pantorno for amNewyork Metro)

Governor Cuomo made the offer that New York state hosts the games for any MLB team that wants to play them, boasting the state’s infection rate is currently below 1%. For players, Cuomo would carve out a new exception from his out of state quarantine rules. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, DC, and Puerto Rico were all added to New York’s quarantine list, bringing the total up to 34 states. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

I nominate that Riverside Park be renamed Trash Panda Park after racoons have taken over. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

The Industry City rezoning is dead. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca is the deciding vote when it comes to the proposal and he has come out in strong opposition to it. Menchaca has laid out multiple conditions for his support and he says they were not met. ITs only hope is that Speaker Corey Johnson step in to rally the council against Menchaca, which seems unlikely. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

A moment of cute! A duck built a nest on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The staff is keeping an eye on it and the new family will be moved to Central Park when they’re ready to leave. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

“I don’t think this is the type of job we should just ‘wing it,’ and that’s the sense I’ve been getting sometimes.” The city’s contact tracing program is not off to a great start. (Sharon Offerman for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio says that unless the federal government’s new stimulus package includes more state aid, the city will be forced to layoff up to 22,000 workers. These are the jobs that he said could be saved with if the city can successfully renegotiate worker contracts with unions by October 1. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Thinking about heading to Long Island to go to the beach to avoid the city’s beaches? Good luck with those sharks. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

12 more bars have had their liquor licenses suspended by the State Liquor Authority, mostly in Jackson Heights, bringing the total to 29. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

For almost $1,000 you can enjoy a three-night stay in the Wythe Hotel, complete with a movie or TV show screening in the hotel’s private screening room. They’ll even throw in popcorn for free. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A federal judge granted a preliminary injunction instructing New York State to begin unemployment payments to Uber and Lyft drivers immediately and promptly. (Noam Scheiber for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Chintatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)