The Briefly for July 6, 2020 – The “Another Sign of the Apocalypse” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase three starts today, where to eat hot dogs, Dekalb Market goes above ground, The NYPD’s SpotShotter is put to the test, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 88˚
Rain in the evening.

Today starts phase three of the city’s reopening. Here’s what you can and can’t do under phase three. First and foremost, don’t stop wearing your damn masks. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Everyone’s got a friend outside the city that’s been talking about moving here on and off. Here’s a link you can send them instead of answering every question they have. How to know if you’re ready fo move to NYC. (Localize.City)

You’d think business interruption insurance would cover a moment like the Covid-19 pandemic, where businesses were… interrupted. You’d be giving the insurance industry too much credit, because they’ve been rejecting claims because businesses haven’t paid for “pandemic insurance.” (Peter Senzamici for The City)

Sound familiar? That’s because insurers were turning down business interruption insurance claims by the thousands after Hurricane Sandy, blaming specific damage on a flood at a Con Ed substation on E. 14th St. (Reuven Blau for Daily News in 2013)

There’s something killing the fish in the Hudson River. While officials say it’s nothing to be alarmed about, it’s hard to not see this as another sign of the apocalypse. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Ailing parents, dying family members, and economic insecurity, and all while trying to graduate high school. (Rebecca Klein for HuffPost)

Video: A look at the history of the “Freedom” tunnel that runs under Riverside Park and how it became the canvas for Chris “Freedom” Pape’s art and a homeless community. (Vice)

In the last month, there have been 95 lawsuits against the Archdiocese of New York with dozens more on the way. When Covid-19 put a pause on all court cases except “essential matters,” it paused all the court cases against the church, prompting the state’s legislature to extend the window for filing cases from January 2021 until August. The governor hasn’t signed the legislation yet, prompting the sudden flood. (Virginia Breen for The City)

The price of renting a one-bedroom apartment in the city dropped 2% and two-bedroom dropped 0.3% in June and rents are 5% down from last year, according to a new report from Zumper. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

In 2018, the Gowanus Canal’s 4th St basin was supposedly cleaned of “Black Mayo,” aka coal tar, by the EPA as a pilot program for the entire waterway. Work on cleaning the entire canal was scheduled to start later this year, using the same techniques. This week, unfortunately, the black mayo returned. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Dog owners are turning to CBD dog treats amid the endless stream of fireworks leading up to July 4. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1, congrats on the new job Kathleen)

The pandemic has brought a classic NYC staple back: rooftop culture. (Monika Hankova for Untapped New York)

Dekalb Market, the underground food hall underneath City Point in Downtown Brooklyn is reopening, but not underground. It will be taking over a portion of Gold Street and Willoughby Square Park as a reimagined Dekalb “Open-Air” Market. (Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

Rafael Espinal couldn’t have picked a worse time to abandon his post as the City Councilmember for Brooklyn’s 37th District if he tried, essentially robbing his former constituents of their voice through the Covid-19 pandemic, protests, and city budget/defund the NYPD debates. A special election was canceled by Governor Cuomo and Bushwick, East New York, and Cypress Hills won’t have representation on the City Council until Janaury. (Nigel Roberts for The Brooklyn Reader)

Van Leeuwen Ice Cream is introducing their summer flavors this week. How does Caramelized Banana Praline sound? (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The union representing 30,000 faculty and staff at CUNY is suing, alleging CUNY violated the terms of its federal bailout by laying off hundreds of adjunct faculty members, and are demanding that they be rehired. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Tips from a hospital stint on protecting yourself from Covid-19. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

What’s the purpose of legal observers if the NYPD keep arresting them? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

It’s been half a year since the mayor boasted to the press about the NYPD and Department of Homeless Services’ command center. A look at the change coming now that the NYPD are being kicked out. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

A memorial was held for Pop Smoke on Friday night outside his parents’ house in Canarsie the night of his album “Shoot for the Stars, Aim for the Moon.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re headed to the city’s beaches, there’s nothing that says you can’t combine the city’s new hobby of birdwatching with your beach-going. It’s piping plover nesting season, so keep an eye out for the endangered (and super cute) bird! (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo instituted a mandatory 14-day quarantine if you’re traveling to New York from 16 different states. How is it being enforced? 🤷‍♂️ (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Highlights from NBC’s recap of a week of “surprise” fireworks displays from Macy’s, including an unexplained shot of a building in South Korea for some reason? (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

The rats have been quiet, but with restaurants opening, expect that to change. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

Visitors are now able to go to the September 11th Memorial for the first time since March. The museum is still closed. (NY1)

The Strand is opening its Upper West Side location this month on Columbus Ave between 81st and 82nd St, the former home of Book Culture. (Sara Lebwohl for I Love The Upper West Side)

A rundown of the fatal five shootings in the city Sunday. (Todd Maisel for amNewyork Metro)

SpotShotter, the system the NYPD uses to detect gunshots, is under a real test with all the fireworks around the city. The system is, pardon the pun, shoddy at best, and its implementation has resulted in the targeting of Black and brown communities. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

RIP Nick Cordero, Tony-nominated Broadway performer, who passed away due to Covid-19. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The de Blasio administration is giving up on the idea of reworking the Brooklyn Bridge promenade, leaving the pedestrian and cyclist nightmare for the city’s next mayor. Here are Scott Stringer, Corey Johnson, and Eric Adams’ takes on the future of the bridge. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More people are riding the MTA’s buses than subways for the first time since volume numbers have been kept. (Christina Goldblum and Winnie Hu for NY Times)

A look at the history of Firemen’s Garden on E 8th St, where the NYFD’s Martin Celic lost his life in 1977. (Ephemeral New York)

A guide to the real-life NYC locations from Hamilton. (Untapped New York)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut and Miki Sudo, this year’s hot dog eating champions who both set new records and are $10,000 richer for it. (ESPN)

Where to eat hot dogs this summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Thrillist)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 30, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining on July 6? Not So Fast.” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor announces moving $1 billion from the NYPD’s budget, a peacock escapes the Prospect Park Zoo, Broadway stays dark, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 79˚
Possible light rain in the evening.

The mayor announced that he’s committed to redirecting $1 billion of the NYPD’s funding to other city resources. This is a move that both the police unions and police protestors are upset with. The perfect de Blasio move, creating as much anger as possible on all sides. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Brooklyn got a second Black Lives Matter street mural last week, this one outside of Borough Hall. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

“We don’t need more Black Lives Matter signs painted on streets. We need a real, true cut, and this money laundering ain’t it.” -Nelini Stamp on the mayor’s $1 billion announcement. The announcement includes the transfer of fringe benefits for school safety agents to the DOE, which move around money, which accomplishes literally nothing. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“The purpose of this article is to outline five specific, systemic, attainable reme­dies to the epidemic of police abuse.” This is from May 28, 1985. (David Swanson for Village Voice)

Maybe we won’t have indoor dining starting on July 6? We’re less than a week away from the city’s supposed start of indoor dining and the mayor says he needs to “examine closely and come to a decision in the next couple of days.” The wavering is due to the spike in Covid-19 cases nationwide, not necessarily in the city. When will a decision be made? You’d assume before July 6. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The NYPL lions, Patience and Fortitude, are wearing masks like all good New Yorkers. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An interactive map of apartment prices at each subway stop in the city, with the 2020 edition showing 36% of subway stops experiencing drops in rent. (RentHop)

How much are you supposed to tip movers? The American Moving and Storage Association suggests $25 per person, which doesn’t seem like much for NYC. Here are some things to keep in mind when calculating a tip. (Rita Cidre for StreetEasy)

Tens of thousands of New Yorkers are facing possible eviction without city, state, and federal aid. The stat’es eviction moratorium ends in August, the federal government’s regular Covid-19 assistance ends in July, creating a perfect storm for evictions. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Making the case why New Yorkers won’t actually move to the suburbs. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

With an unsure future ahead for the city’s schools, the Department of Education purchased an additional 40,000 iPads for students for summer school students, adding to the 300,000 it’s already purchased. (Reema Amin for The City)

Interview: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Black Lives Matter, representing NYC in Congress, her first two years in Congress, and more. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

We don’t have results from the June 23 primaries and elections yet, and it still may be a while until we get results. There were 765,000 absentee ballots distributed, but only 471,000 votes were cast in person, so when it comes to results we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg. (Jim Brennan for Gotham Gazette)

Broadway will be closed through at least the end of the year. All tickets through January 3 have been refunded, but there’s been no statement on a return date. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Remember how the MTA was in the process of re-designing Brooklyn’s bus systems? Forget it. The MTA says Covid-19 has forced them to put a hold on the plans and they’ll publish a revised timeline in “the next few months.” An announcement to say they’ll make an announcement about an announcement in a few months. The original plan was due at the end of the second quarter. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Will 24-hour subway service ever return? Maybe. The governor is leaving a lot of wiggle room in all of his answers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Will offices ever go back to normal? amNY looks at the Empire State Building as a bellwether for recovery. Only 15-20% of the building’s occupants that could return have returned during phase two. (Imani Moise and Echo Wang for Reuters)

Crown Heights Caribbean spot Glady’s is shutting its doors permanently due to Covid-19. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Downtown Brooklyn Public Art + Placemaking Fund award in Brooklyn is giving grants of up to $50,000 for public art and performance projects looking to revitalize portions of Downtown Brooklyn. Applications are open through June 25, 2020. (BKLYNER)

Around the city, you’ll find flyers for someone selling flan. A look at New Yorkers who have started businesses making cooking and baking during the pandemic. (Devorah Lev-Tov for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio wants to do something about solitary confinement. He’s assembled a “working group” whose job it will be to create a plan to end solitary confinement and “punitive segregation.” (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Interview: Milton Glaser, shortly before his death, talking about a design idea to unify the city around the word “together.” (Jeremy Alias for NY Times)

13 things you didn’t know about the Woolworth Building. (Michele Cohen for 6sqft)

The city will take over more streets in the evenings to combine Open Streets and Open Restaurants to push restaurant seating into the car lanes and create pedestrian walkways down the center of the street. The streets haven’t been announced but will begin this weekend and run through Labor Day on Friday nights, and all day on Saturdays and Sundays. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The City Council unanimously passed the COVID-19 Funding Tracker Bill to establish a public database to track city spending in an attempt to provide balance for relief throughout the city. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the police’s violent actions against the Queer Liberation March, Washington Square Park’s statues of George Washington were splattered with red paint in protest. Washington was targeted for his ownership of slaves. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

On Saturday the Covid-19 death toll in New York was down to five, the lowest since March 15. With the United States’ cases hitting new all-time highs, will the people who left the city return and bring new cases with them? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

In a ramp-up to the weekend and lifeguards returning to beaches, food vendors have returned to Jacob Riis Beach. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A parakeet has been spotted hanging out in Tompkins Square Park. (EV Grieve)

Photos: A peacock escaped from the Prospect Park Zoo. It checked out Flatbush Ave, was chased around by the NYPD, and flew back home. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Thanks to reader Zlata for the photo of last night’s “surprise” fireworks on the East River!

The Briefly for May 27, 2020 – The “The Last Region Under PAUSE” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city caps Seamless fees for restaurants, a $1,000 to fill out the census, Uber and Lyft drivers sue for unemployment, Central Park Karen, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 70˚
Overcast throughout the day.

Queens has a new Cold Case Unit under DA Melinda Katz, dedicated to solving the borough’s oldest and unsolved homicide cases. There are currently about 2,200 unsolved homicides in Queens. (Queens County Politics)

“I”m going to tell them there’s an African-American man threatening my life.” The story of the Central Park Karen, Amy Cooper, whose week started with a threatening to use the NYPD as a weapon, and two days later she was fired for her job and surrendered her dog. (Zack Linly for The Root)

It’s no surprise, but today it’s a reality. New York City is the only region of the state still under the PAUSE order by Governor Cuomo. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Have you filled out the census yet? Only 50% of the city has and we’re lagging 10% behind the rest of the country. In an effort to bump up the numbers, NYC Census 2020 is giving away $1,000 Seamless gift cards. More than a gift card, I’m sure you’re seeing photos and videos from around the country of idiots getting together without masks. These are the people who will have more representation and funding in and from the government because they filled out their census this year. These yahoos are gonna fly to NYC from whatever podunk, backwater town they live in, and infect more New Yorkers while they go out for SantaCon or take photos with the Naked Cowboy or puke on the floor of a bathroom in the East Village or walk extremely slowly on the sidewalk right in front of you. These are the people that can fill in their census and yet we can’t seem to get our shit together and need gift cards to Seamless as an incentive. Rant over. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Want to bring a smile to someone? Send some letters to some older Upper West Siders. (Claude Benjamin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Uber and Lyft drivers are suing the state for timely payment of unemployment benefits. Currently, drivers have to wait months to receive standard unemployment benefits, unlike the standard two to three weeks like most workers. (Noam Scheiber for NY Times)

Video: Watch former New Yorkers try L.A. bagels. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The city has hired more than 1,700 contact tracers to get the city closer to the metrics necessary to start its reopening. (NY1)

How good of a salesman is Governor Cuomo? We’re about to find out, as the governor heads to Washington to convince President Trump to fund the extension of the Second Ave subway, the new Penn Station, and a train to LaGuardia. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A quick look at the 80-year history of the Copacabana. (Maria Sherman for Jezebel)

The Obie Awards, honoring Off and Off Off Broadway theater, is going virtual. You can catch the Obie Awards on YouTube on June 4, hosted by Cole Escola. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Alt-side parking is suspended through June 7. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

What if no one wants to save New York’s restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

ConEd is trying to raise rates this summer and the City Council is having none of it. ConEd is warning that demand may exceed last summer where brown and blackouts plagued portions of the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: A pre/post Covid-19 comparison walk around Midtown. (ActionKid)

Seventeen of the city’s 20 hate crimes against Asians in 2020 have been coronavirus related. 20 may not seem like much, but compare that to 2019’s hate crimes against Asians at 3. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The mayor signed a package of bills into laws intended to protect small businesses by imposing limits on third-party food delivery services, extending the suspension of sidewalk cafe fee collection, and protecting commercial tenants from harassment and personal liability. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Would you go to a concert if it meant having to wear this weird neon spacesuit? How do you drink or go to the bathroom if you’re sealed inside a spacesuit at a show? (Erin Christie for BrooklynVegan)

Video: New York’s “Wear A MAsk” PSA contest has a winner. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The New York Stock Exchange partially opened on Tuesday and is prohibiting employees and visitors from taking mass transit, something extremely impractical to use as an example for other businesses. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Nets opened its training facility in Sunset Park to players for voluntary workouts with a limit of four players in the facility at a time. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Restrictions on third-party delivery companies like Seamless or Uber Eats caps fees at 15 percent per order for delivery and 5 percent per order for any other charge while the city is under emergency and for 90 days beyond. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Actors’ Equity Association barred its 51,000 members from in-person auditions, rehearsals, and performances and says they will not lift that restriction until there is fast, reliable testing for the novel coronavirus and widespread contact tracing. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A breakdown of the costs of what’s recommended before you move to NYC. (Localize.City)

Why hasn’t Mayor de Blasio visited Rikers Island at all during his second term? (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Recreating recipes from restaurants is a long-standing tradition which has seen a revival under stay-at-home orders. Are we chasing the recipe and a meal or are we chasing a feeling and trying to rekindle memories? (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Video: Recreating New York’s best pancakes from Clinton St Baking Company. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Thanks to reader Alexa for today’s featured photo!