The Briefly for August 30, 2019 – The “Celebrations Have Already Begun” Labor Day Weekend Edition

Holiday weekend subway changes, closed streets for J’Ouvert and West Indian Day Carnival, bringing a dead squirrel on the subway, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The first Labor Day celebration took place in Manhattan 130 years ago. (amNY)

Street closings and timings for this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival. (Curbed)

This weekend is the last big weekend for the Hailstone icehouse in Crown Heights, as they sell ice like it’s going out of style, 40 pounds at a time. (NY Times)

What’s open and closed for Labor Day weekend. (Patch)

This weekend’s weather is looking pretty comfortable. (amNY)

The change from L train shutdown to slowdown is nearly doubling the project’s cost. (Curbed)

Step inside of Sweet Afton and you’ll feel like you’re inside a Wes Anderson movie. It wouldn’t be far from the truth, because the bar’s redesign was put together by Kris Moran, set designer for Moonrise Kingdom. (Time Out)

NYCHA General Manager Vito Mustaciuolo is under investigation for harassment. An expose in the Daily News outlined his misbehavior. The NYCHA hasn’t said if he will continue working full-time while the investigation proceeds. (Patch)

It’s that time of year again: New York Fashion Week starts next weekend. (amNY)

Squirrels can be cute, but bringing a dead squirrel onto the subway is not cute. (Patch)

A look at the rejected ballots from the Katz/Cabán primary in Queens and how easily Katz’s 55-vote lead could have been easily erased. (The Indypendent)

Put Stan Lee on New York’s new license plate, you cowards! (Bronx Times)

A preview of Portal: Governors Island, an art fair which opens on Governors Island this Saturday. (Gothamist)

Where to eat and shop in Hell’s Kitchen. (amNY)

The five-day celebration of J’Ouvert has already begun. (Street Easy)

Brooklyn’s first Chick-fil-A is accused of trying to poach workers from local businesses. (Patch)

The City Council is being accused of trying to bury a public meeting about the plan to replace Rikers Island with four “community” jails by scheduling it on the hectic first day of school. (Queens Eagle)

The number of city classrooms with lead-paint hazards has doubled after a set of inspections, bringing the number to 1,858. The city says all the affected classrooms will be ready for Thursday’s first day of school. The Department of Education is supposed to inspect each classroom annually. (Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has failed to qualify for the next round of Democratic presidential debates in September. The mayor has already said he didn’t plan on dropping out of the race if he didn’t qualify. Mayor, what is so wrong with the city that you lead that you’d prefer to spend this much time away from it? (Patch)

Despite the law signed by Governor Cuomo last week barring them from state waters, the company floating billboards around Manhattan and Brooklyn’s shoreline continues to do so after finding a loophole in the language used in the law. The state has not enforced the new law with any citations. (Gothamist)

The case against Jeffrey Epstein was officially closed by a Manhattan federal judge. (Patch)

One of the hidden gems of the garment district is Acuario Cafe. How can you find it? There no signs and you can only find by walking through a freight elevator of an office building on 37th St. (Viewing NYC)

Do you know about the IFC’s secret peephole? (Bedford + Bowery)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge bike lanes make riding across the bridge easy. Getting to the bridge on a bike? Much more difficult. (amNY)

Two former NYPD Detectives who were initially accused of raping an 18-year-old woman in their custody have pleaded guilty to receiving a bribe and “official misconduct” for having sex with a teenager inside a police van after a traffic stop in Coney Island, and will only serve five years of probation. (Gothamist)

16 fantastic Filipino restaurants. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 19, 2019 – The “Daniel Pantaleo Lied About The Chokehold” Edition

The MTA’s board is as functional as their trains, the rice cooker guy is caught, Nutcracker summer, finding hidden parks and gardens, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subway work is relatively light this week, but still inconvenient if you’re on the 2, 3, 7, A, E, N or Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

Registration for the 2019 Daffodil Project is available. The Daffodil Project was created post-9/11 to create a living memorial to September 11 city-wide by giving out half a million bulbs a year to be planted in public spaces. (New Yorkers for Parks)

It’s been 14 years since the renovations at the Rugby branch of the Brooklyn Public Library started and we’re still a year away from seeing it completed. (The City)

Jose Alzorriz is the 19th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets this year. A petition with over 1,000 signatures is calling for a traffic safety study of Coney Island Avenue following his death. (amNY)

Judge Rosemarie Maldonado’s ruling of Daniel Pantaleo’s involvement in the death of Eric Garner is that he was “untruthful” when he said he didn’t use a chokehold and its use was “a gross deviation from the standard of conduct established for a New York City police officer.” So what now? The city waits for commissioner James O’Neill to hopefully fire Pantaleo. (NY Times)

CitiBike is celebrating the one year anniversary of its Reduced Fare Bike Share program with a free month of membership to NYCHA residents and SNAP recipients starting today. (amNY)

In order to accommodate longer buses, the MTA is cutting nine stops from the B38 bus line, which services from Ridgewood in Queens to Downtown Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Paper)

The history and tradition of opening fire hydrants to cool off. (NY Times)

Two things of note: There is a Coca-Cola Freestyle competition and Queen’s Danuta Rybak is one of the five finalists. (QNS)

17 lighthouses to check out before the summer is over. (Untapped Cities)

This weekend is a “Clear the Shelters” weekend, where the ASPCA will be waiving adoption fees for cats and dogs on Saturday. It’s time to get that cat or dog you’ve been thinking about. (Gothamist)

The six best neighborhoods in Brooklyn for a budget. (StreetEasy)

Sixth Ave in Chelsea is deadly for pedestrians and cyclists. A pedestrian, hit by a driver last week, died of her injuries. Over 130 people have died on city streets this year, up from 108 at this time last year. (Streetsblog)

This week’s list of restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. (Patch)

The MTA is removing bus schedules from its bus stops in an attempt to save money. Replacing them is a sign to call 511 or download the MTA’s app. Sixteen politicians from Queens are pushing back, pointing out that access to a cell phone isn’t always a guarantee and the $550,000 saved on bus schedules seems like a drop in the bucket compared to the $42 billion deficit expected by 2022. (amNY)

If you love seeing rats, Brooklyn is your borough. (Bushwick Daily)

Could Tiffany Cabán’s big to win the Democratic nomination for Queens DA have ended with her nomination without the NY Working Families Party? (The Indypendent)

If you missed the Perseid meteor shower, Scott Segler made a time-lapse. (Viewing NYC)

The Brooklyn War Memorial (and nearby bathrooms) will be undergoing renovations starting in November. The monument has been closed for 27 years. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Blue Point Brewing Co is opening a literal underground brewpub. Granted they’ll only have a two-barrel system, but it’s an A for effort. The Hull is expected to open in October. (amNY)

11 people in the city have been hospitalized and treated for “severe lung trauma” after vaping with products THC and nicotine. This isn’t exclusive to New York, similar illnesses have been reported nationwide. (Gothamist)

We may not have jetpacks, but liquid nitrogen, hydraulic presses, and centrifuges are all being used to make cocktails. (Viewing NYC)

A vegan guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The cast of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is raising funds for the homeless youth of the city through Covenant House with a “sleep out” tonight. It’s not about simulating the experience, though Rachel Brosnahan and some cast-mates will be sleeping on 34th St, but raising funds and awareness. Donations can be made at sleepout.org. (amNY)

The MTA’s board is about as functional as the MTA’s trains and buses, as a recent meeting devolved into a shouting match between two members. (amNY)

You can tell your uncle to stop posting on Facebook about Jeffrey Epstein’s death because it was determined to be suicide by the city’s medical examiner. A look at the last days of Jeffrey Epstein. (NY Times)

Video: Watch the boring machine break through the end of the Delaware Aqueduct tunnel repair as the Department of Environmental Protection closes in on a $1 billion repair project. (Gothamist)

A look at Dexter Park, a 20,000 baseball stadium in Woodhaven which was home to the Bushwicks, a semi-pro baseball team part of the Inter-city Baseball Association. (QNS)

The man in the video circulated by the NYPD in connection to the bomb-scare rice cookers left around Manhattan on Friday, 25-year-old Larry K. Griffin II, was taken into custody on Saturday. (NY Times)

Seven Republicans are rushing to lose an election to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Politico)

A map of the city’s hidden parks and secret gardens. (Curbed)

This summer is the Hot Girl Summer, but every summer in New York City is Nutcracker Summer. (NY Times)

The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)