The Briefly for July 25, 2019 – The “In-N-Out Mystery Has Been Solved” Edition

The MTA will reorganize, Amazon eyes a move in Sunset Park, the mayor will unveil a new bike safety plan, Occupy NYCHA, dog jails return, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

After 17 bicyclists have died on city streets at the hands of drivers, the mayor has decided that his Vision Zero program isn’t enough, and will be unveiling a $58.4 million bike safety plan. (NY Times)

Step inside America’s first theatrical club, The Lambs, with a photo gallery. (Untapped Cities)

Summer Streets makes its return to… the summer’s streets on Saturdays in August on Park Avenue from East 51st St to Foley Square. (Gothamist)

The In-N-Out mystery has been solved. A teenager brought four burgers back from CA and accidentally dropped one in the street. What’s the next city mystery that needs solving? (Eater)

The best cold noodles in NYC. (Grub Street)

Making weekend plans? Here are NYC’s seaside neighborhoods that are calling your name this summer. (amNY)

Eater asks: Is Per Se good again? The answer? “Sort of.” (Eater)

Gothamist is hiring a fulltime digital reporter/producer. (Gothamist)

Firstess Earth Crosby died this week after the injuries she sustained at the end of February from being run over with a truck. The driver was not issued a summons and has not been charged. She was the 59th pedestrian to die in 2019 as a result of the actions of a driver. (Streetsblog)

“Daniel Pantaleo and the other officers involved in Eric Garner’s horrific death should be fired.” Corey Johnson was able to say what our mayor was not. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The slowest Bronx bus is the Bx19 with a speedy 4.8 mph average, the most unreliable is the Bx3, which arrived bunched with other Bx3 buses 19,2% of the time. (Welcome2TheBronx)

“Why put up tin cans?” Sometimes art is too abstract for its own good. There is a backlash against a public art installation in Chinatown by residents because the abstract piece has seemingly no connection to Chinese culture. (Gothamist)

The MTA, after a 1-2 punch of being told by the governor to address the growing homeless population on the subways and learning the contractor they hired to handle homeless outreach was doing anything but, announced a href=”https://www.6sqft.com/mta-moves-to-create-homelessness-task-force-as-outreach-efforts-come-under-scrutiny/”>they will create a homeless task force that will have 30 days to create a plan. (6sqft)

The City Council passed the “Storefront Tracker” bill that requires landlords to report on the storefronts they own and rent out to better help the city understand commercial rents and how many storefronts are vacant across the city. Landlords who don’t comply within 120 days will start to be hit with fines. (Curbed)

Stan Lee Way will be coming to University Ave between Brandt Pl and @ 176 in University Heights, near his childhood home. (Bronx Times)

Remember those little air-conditioned dog jails that popped up outside grocery stores a few years ago? They’re coming back with a “pet harbor” pilot program that will allow you to put your pooch into one of these dog jails for up to an hour. (6sqft)

The state legislature failed to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in 2019. Can they get the job done in 2020? (amNY)

ConEd is only five years late on delivering a plan to help prevent power outages caused by heatwaves. (Gothamist)

Three days after ConEd intentionally cut the power to Brooklyn neighborhoods, there are still people without power. (Brooklyn Paper)

You can get a rare look inside the Little Red Lighthouse in Washington Heights this weekend. (6qft)

11 days after being shut down by the Department of Health, the Time Out Market in DUMBO has reopened. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Nothing will stop the mayor from working out in the Park Slope YMCA, not the one hour drive between Gracie Mansion and Park Slope, and not a bomb threat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

You’re trapped inside a stalled subway train. What do you do? Here’s a guide. (Gothamist)

Don’t let stories about Amazon looking to lease one million square feet in Industry City confuse you, Amazon already leases one million square feet nearby and their contract is ending and they’re reportedly seeing what their options are. (Brownstoner)

Amelia Earhart, Greenwich Villager. (GVSHP)

Three men involved in throwing some water on NYPD officers have been arrested and charged with criminal mischief. Don’t worry, the conversation around this incident has already been blown completely out of proportion by multiple people. (NY Times)

Video: What you need to know about the 1/2/3 train switch replacement at 96th St and how it will ruin your commute. (Viewing NYC)

There will be an Occupy NYCHA rally at City Hall on Friday. Meet the women behind it. (Gothamist)

The MTA approved a reorganization that could cut 2,700 jobs from the agency, save $530 million annually, and will not help your commute. (amNY)

A look at North Crown Heights, where Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and the neighborhood supports an upzoning proposal to create new business opportunities. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

16 bubble tea shops to try in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for July 18, 2019 – The “Act Like a Summer Goth to Stay Cool” Edition

There have been two additional ConEd blackouts this week, will electric scooters raise real estate prices, hidden bookstores, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the landlords challenging the new rent reforms. (The Real Deal)

Did you know you can see pieces of the Berlin Wall in the city? There’s a piece in an office building, another in Ripley’s Believe It Or Not, another on the Intrepid, but three sections stand together in the United Nations’ garden. (Untapped Cities)

The mayor is “jaded” over ConEd. This follows the Staten Island outage, the Upper West Side outage and a third reported outage in Coney Island all in the same week. He urged New Yorkers to set air conditioners at 78 to help lighten the load for everyone. (amNY)

We have entered the stages of a heat emergency across the city. The official advice is that if you don’t have to be outside or in the sun, pretend you’re a goth teen and stay indoors. If you don’t have air conditioning, the city has 500 cooling centers you have access to. (Curbed)

El Chapo was sentenced to life in prison, putting his career in crime and also the woes caused by his constant crossing of the Brooklyn Bridge to travel between prison and the courthouse under police escort, to an end. (NY Times)

Here’s a map of the city’s cooling centers. (6sqft)

The night that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldren stepped foot on the moon, there was a viewing party in Central Park. The “Moon-In” showed just how moon-crazy the city had gotten. (6sqft)

Nothing quite like a rush-hour breakdown of MetroCard machines to really instill confidence that the MTA will get the OMNY contactless payment right. The MetroCard systems stopped accepting credit cards and the MTA’s Twitter account announced the issue five minutes after it was fixed. Great job all around. (Patch)

When the plastic bag ban takes hold, it only pertains to grocery and big-box stores. Some advocates say it doesn’t go far enough, but the city will feel the collective pain together in March. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The story of BK Yoga Club, an inclusive, body-positive yoga studio in Dumbo, run by Alicia Ferguson and Paris Alexandra. (Bushwick Daily)

The city firefighter that was arrested last month for being caught on video seemingly trying to run over a cyclist is back on the job following his one-month suspension. Further disciplinary action may follow. (Streetsblog)

The top ten hidden bookstores in the city. (Untapped Cities)

This seems like a great weekend to have brunch reservations in order to minimize the amount of time spent waiting for a table outside. 30 great brunch spots that take reservations. (The Infatuation)

Take a look inside Pomander Walk with this house for same, the exclusive 1920s Tudor-style gated community on the Upper West Side. For a bit over $2 million, it can be yours. (6sqft)

The chief business officer at the electric scooter company Lime was boasting that access to electric scooters means more access to bikes and scooters would mean the city would become more accessible, which raise real estate prices. Is that an argument for or against scooters? (The Real Deal)

Seen a bunch of Waldos around the city today? There’s a reason for that. (amNY)

The Time Out Market food hall had its doors shut by the Department of Health after it failed a restaurant inspection and hasn’t re-opened since. They are working to address the issues pointed out by their 102 point violation before they can reopen. (Brooklyn Paper)

At this point, nothing the mayor says or does should be able to disappoint us, but he keeps finding new ways to do instill a feeling of malaise to anyone who hears him speaking. The latest eye-roll comes from calls to have Officer Daniel Pantaleo fired for his role in Eric Garner’s death. (NY Times)

Gossip Girl is already being rebooted. (Huff Post)

There have been at least eight ICE raids across the city in the last five days. Do not open your doors for law enforcement if they do not have the proper paperwork to compel you. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

20 standout restaurants and bars in Prospect Heights. (Eater)

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The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “A Love Letter to the Salt Bagel” Weekend Edition

Fighting this weekend’s planned ICE raids, more people are staying put in Brooklyn and Queens, the city’s speed camera program starts to expand and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The president’s ICE raids scheduled to take place this weekend have included New York as a target. The governor announced anyone in need of assistance may contact the Liberty Defense Project via the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 or liberty@dos.ny.gov.

What should you do if ICE is at your door or the door of someone you know? Here are the ACLU’s guidelines and outlines of your rights. (ACLU)

The Amazon Web Services Summit at the Javitz Center drew crowds protesting Amazon’s involvement with ICE with their Rekognition Video system. (amNY)

Riding the subway still sucks, but it sucks the least its sucked since 2013, with an on-time performance over 80%. (Curbed)

Check the trains before you venture out this weekend. This is the last weekend of reduced L train service before the multi-week night and weekend partial shutdown starts and remains through January. (Subway Weekender)

R. Kelly was arrested by the NYPD and Homeland Security in Chicago on federal sex trafficking charges and is expected to be brought to New York to face those charges. (NBC New York)

A love letter to the salt bagel. (Eater)

The NYPD claims to have figured out the reason for an uptick of shootings in northern Brooklyn: District Attorney Eric Gonzalez. The NYPD is blaming a program where weapons-possession offenders can plead guilty and take part in an educational program instead of being jailed. Putting the blame on this program has two flaws. The program is a decade old, the uptick in shootings are only in one portion of the borough while the program is borough-wide, and it does not apply to anyone who has used a gun, only those possessing them. (Brooklyn Paper)

Have mannequin, will carpool. A hero from New Jersey was pulled over on the Verrazzano Bridge for trying to using his “friend” as a reason to use the HOV lane. (Gothamist)

The photos your friends post to Instagram from Storm King are nice and all, but have you thought about who’s job it is to mow the grass? Meet Mike Seaman, who leads a seven-person crew. (NY Times)

Much like Williamsburg, the neighborhood it calls home, the Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel and San Paolino di Nola is changing with the times. For the first time organizers opened up the carrying of the giglio, a four-ton and 72-foot-tall spire, and a life-size sculpture of a boat, to outsiders. This Sunday is giglio Sunday. (NY Times)

Irving Plaza is closed for eight months to be renovated. (EV Grieve)

The city provides about 146 square feet of green space per resident, which is smaller than a 12 foot by 12-foot room. Of the fifteen major cities in the story, New York was dead last. (Patch)

Speaking of green space, Shirley Chisholm State Park can lay claim to the title of “the city’s nicest park built on top of a toxic dump.” (Curbed)

In reflection of its 20th year, Untapped Cities sat down with Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond to discuss his favorite places in the city, future public projects, the Spur, and more. (Untapped Cities)

The latest step in a neighbor-feud in Kew Gardens is a bloody splattered mannequin who seems to be daring neighbors to call 311 against it. A truly amazing amount of pettiness. (Gothamist)

The expansion of the city’s speed camera program kicked off this week. The city will add 40-60 cameras a month until the number reaches 750 from the current 140. (Curbed)

“Slave Play,” a look at race relations through the prism of the sexual hangups of three interracial couples, is coming to Broadway this spring and will run for 17 weeks. (NY Times)

The reunited The Misfits announced their first-ever show at Madison Square Garden, tickets are on sale next week. (BrooklynVegan)

How Darren Walker, a gay black man who grew up poor in Texas, came to be one of the best-connected people in New York City. And what that means for the future of philanthropy. (NY Times)

A photo gallery of Coney Island through the years. (amNY)

The Parks Department publicly apologized to the family of Robert Sommer, who was one of the fifteen cyclists killed by drivers this year, for removing his memorial ghost bike in Marine Park without notifying his family first. (Brooklyn Paper)

Would you pay $275 to be a guest on a podcast? Say what you want, but it’s working for Uluç Ülgen, the host of mürmur, a podcast that is “part performance art, part social documentary, part mystical, and part comedy.” If you don’t want to pay the fee to appear, you can always subscribe on iTunes. (Bedford + Bowery)

A taxi jumped the curb and crashed into a Westville in Hell’s Kitchen on Ninth Avenue Westville. Five people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and three declined medical attention. No reason was released for the driver’s actions. (Gothamist)

The Washington Square Park “Die-In” to bring attention to the crisis created by the failures of the mayor’s Vision Zero program has worked. Nearly every media outlet in the city has written about it, and it has now received the New York Times treatment. (NY Times)

More and more people in Brooklyn and Queens are choosing to renew their leases instead of moving to new apartments. Rants in both boroughs are up, but rents in Queens are down 4.2% since May. (The Real Deal)

Mia Simmons, the 20-year-old woman charged with manslaughter for the stabbing death of 30-year-old Latanya Watson, was defending herself according to her lawyer. Video footage shows the pair fighting on the platform and Simmons’s lawyer claims Watson was the aggressor. (Gothamist)

An Ed Sheeran pop-up shop will be open on Wooster Street today from 3:06 through 9:06. Now you know where to go or where to avoid, depending who you are. (amNY)

Say hello to the Carrot Dog, the humane twist on the New York staple, which are now available ay by CHLOE. Delightful, disgusting, or both? (Gothamist)

Whoops, the Time Out Market in Dumbo was shut down by the Department of Health. The food hall is expected to be reopened shortly. (Eater)

The MTA’s rules restrict the kinds of secondary jobs its workers can hold, which three dozen violated by moonlighting as Lyft /Uber drivers without agency permission. Five were fired. (Patch)

The governor won’t sign a bill that would loosen restrictions on affidavit ballots that would also retroactively decide the contested Queens DA race. (Jackson Heights Post)

After the arrest of Tyresse Singleton for the alleged burning of rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge in Harlem, a new set of flags are proudly waving. (amNY)

A look inside the bribery and corruption of two men who are partially responsible for the current taxi medallion financial crisis. (NY Times)

Everyone has a friend who always chooses the most expensive restaurant possible and the bill for the eight of you looks like someone’s rent instead of a bill for the meal. That’s the inspiration behind the list of the best restaurants for affordable group dinners. (The Infatuation)

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