The Briefly for December 6, 2019 – The “Your New Year’s Wishes Will Become Literal Trash” Weekend Edition

In today’s daily NYC digest: The weekend’s subway disruptions, coffee rat, Gambino family mobsters were caught for racketeering, the best unsing restaurants, and more

This weekend’s subways are a mess of fun, including a few suspensions. Better check before you go if you’re along the 4, 5, A, E, J, N, Q, and R trains. (Lance for Subway Weekender)

The owners of Luna Park in Coney Island are raising the rent on the independently owned businesses on the Riegelmann Boardwalk by 500% on January 1. On top of the rent, they also take 10% of the sales as well. It’s a greedy move by the largest lease-holder in Coney Island, who tried to evict all the businesses on the boardwalk in 2010. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The LinkNYC kiosks were supposed to by “a critical step toward a more equal, open, and connected city,” according to the mayor. Instead, they’re digital billboards, an additional form of surveillance, magnets for controversy, and of the 7,500 that were to be installed, only 1,774 are in operation. With less than 25% of the promised numbers actually delivered, they have done little to address the digital divide in the city. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

Spend a Sunday with Cheslie Kryst, Miss USA. (Tammy La Gorce for NY Times)

Your wishes for 2020 can become literal trash less than an hour into the new year. If you want to see your hopes and dreams end up in the sewer, you can submit a new year wish to be included on Times Square confetti in-person or online. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Is the MTA’s “Rockaway Parkway Station” an abbreviation or an amazing typo? (@clauirizarry)

Holiday windows in NYC you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Do you need to be reminded that fishing in the Gowanus Canal, a waterway whose water was nicknamed “Black Mayo,” is a bad idea? The answer is a surprising “yes,” because the city is adding more signs reminding people of the Superfund status of the canal. (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 421-a tax abatement program was meant to spur development and make home-owning less of a financial burden by temporarily lowering real estate tax bills, but that temporary financial relief is exactly that. Only temporary. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Real estate tax is tricky to begin with. On average Bronx and Staten Island homeowners have lower home values, but pay a higher percentage of the value of their homes compared to other boroughs. There are four classes of property that are all taxed differently and assessments vary. Reform is on the agenda for 2020. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

Meet Lauren Ashcraft, the 30-year-old democrat socialist challenging U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney for her seat in Congress. (Victoria Merlino for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“Jagged Little Pill” on Broadway is a Times Critic’s Pick. (Jesse Green for NY Times)

You might see headlines about how Di Fara Pizza will “deliver” its pizza for the first time. While it’s technically true, they are working with a company that ships food through the mail rather than locally. While it’s a fun gimmick to say that you can get a pizza from Di Fara “delivered” to your friend in Seattle, it’s also not the delivery you were looking for. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Who are the people clamoring for Blockbuster Video merchandise in 2019? Well, a pop-up on Soho is here for them to get their fix of a doomed business from the 90s. (Untapped New York)

The Sanitation Department have select the garbage cans of tomorrow, and they look like garbage cans. The cans of tomorrow will be seen on Fifth Ave near 90th St first before implemented more widely across the city. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A Target is coming to Times Square and it’s expected to open in 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Kellogg’s NYC near Union Square, where for some reason you could get a bowl of cereal for $1.50, is closed. Miraculously, it was open for nearly two years. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where to ice skate in the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s homeless relocation program has been under investigation since February for placing families in unsafe living conditions outside city limits. Newark is suing NYC in federal court for moving homeless families into Newark slums. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The NYPD has more tasers than ever, and it seems like they’re trigger-happy to use those tasers on people of color and the “emotionally disturbed” based on four years of complaints about improper use. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Today marks the release of the third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. What would her classic-six apartment on Riverside Drive be worth today? (Emily McDonald for StreetEasy)

The filming locations of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Dyker Heights Christmas lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An explosion at an Amtrak facility in the Bronx has left one person dead and two people with minor injuries, according to the FDNY. (Elizabeth Kim and Andy Mai for Gothamist)

Congrats to everyone who posted photos of a viral milkshake to Instagram, you’ve participated in the dumbest food trend of the decade. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Okay, so now Coffee Rat is now a thing. Great. (Ben Kayas for Gothamist)

Are there still Gambino mobsters out there? Yes, because 12 of them, including their boss Andrew Campos, were arrested on racketeering and loan sharking charges on Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Are you one of the 50,000 whose late fees to the New York Public Library were referred to a collections agency? (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Take a deep breath. There have been no reported Mandarin Duck sightings in a while and some pessimists have feared the worst. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Under their new contract, bus and subway workers would get a roughly 10% raise over the next four years. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Great New Year’s Eve restaurants that don’t require a tasting menu. (The Infatuation)

The ten best unsung restaurants from the Times’ Hungry City columnist. (Ligaya Michan for NY Times)

The Briefly for November 25, 2019 – The “We Have A Heart, Also You’re Under Arrest” Edition

The mayor’s Rockefeller Center pedestrian plaza plans meets resistance, where to eat on Thanksgiving, Bloomberg gets into the race, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This week’s late night subway disruptions end on Wednesday night, because holiday schedules start on Thursday. (Subway Weekender)

It’s that time of year again, time to start speculating if weather will ground the Thanksgiving Day Parade balloons. (CNN)

Construction injuries were up 61% last year and the city is mobilizing its inspectors to make surprise visits to the largest construction sites to crack down on dangerous conditions and it seems to be working. Injuries are down 26% this yer. The team of 38 has carried out 10,256 surprise inspections and that still only covers a quarter of active construction sites. (NY Times)

Portraits of the city’s Black vegan movement from Black VegFest. (Civil Eats)

FedEx’s delivery robots have made their way to Lower Manhattan. (Gothamist)

It’s hard enough to figure out what is temperature appropriate to wear on a daily basis in the city when the outside temperature is below freezing, some subway platforms are roughly 85 degrees, and your average office temperature fluctuates between chilly and uncomfortably cold, let along if you’re moving from California. Welcome to New York Joan Summers, none of us know how to dress in New York City. (Jezebel NYC)

The NYPD’s Chief of Transit is committed to go on a four borough “tour” to meet with subway vendors and community members to show that transit cops “have a heart.” (Gothamist)

Those same NYPD transit cops gave Matthew Chavez, the creator of the “Subway Therapy” project, a ticket for his post-it note-based project which has been going for over two years without incident in the tunnel between 6th and 7th Aves in the 14th St subway stop. (Gothamist)

NYPD transit cops pinned a homeless woman to the ground and handcuffed her in another disturbing video made public by passersby. The mayor’s office claims the woman was being sent to a hospital as a part of the MTA’s “homeless outreach.” Weird how helping someone with a mental illness looks a lot like arresting them. (Gothamist)

Protests against the NYPD’s policing of the subways briefly shut down the 125th St stop on the 4/5/6 on Friday night. (amNewYork)

Photos from the protest, which resulted in 58 arrests. (The Independent)

The Coney Island subway station is roofed with solar panels, but they’ve been off-line since in 2012. When installed, the panels were supposed to cut back on 17,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions over 40 years. That is, of course, if they are operational. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city will shut down Fifth and Sixth Aves surrounding Rockefeller Plaza to cars for portions fo the day from Thanksgiving to January in hopes of relieving sidewalk congestion and forcing automobile traffic to find another way around the neighborhood. This is the plan that the Department of Transportation announced last month and the mayor said wasn’t yet approved. (NY Times)

The FDNY has “deep health and safety concerns” about the pedestrian plaza plan, claiming it will make it harder to get around the area due to rerouting of vehicles and that the mayor’s office didn’t adequately notify the local fire companies. (amNewYork)

The MTA isn’t happy with the plan either, due to the bus stops that will be bypassed during the hours the pedestrian plazas will be in operation. (Streetsblog)

The city’s reported HIV cases are at their lowest since the city started tracking them in 2001, with until 2000 cases reported in 2018. That number is 67% down from 2001. (amNewYork)

The NYPD agreed to give the Civilian Complaint Review Board access to body-cam footage except in the most serious cases. It sounds simple, but the actual agreement is ridiculous. There will be a “secure room” where one NYPD member will look for footage and one CCRB member will oversee. This is meant to get the CCRB footage without 10-25 days instead of the current 18-month backlog that exists. (Gothamist)

If you love Christmas more than anything else in this world, this Buddy the Elf-themed hotel room at the Midtown 45 is probably up your alley. (Time Out)

The NYPD took time to attend a Community Board 6 meeting to spread fear about the bail reforms kicking in starting in January. Bail reforms were signed into law in April. (Bronx Times)

The NYPD aren’t the only ones fear-mongering over bail reform. Republican State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, who represents Bay Ridge and a portion of Staten Island, is hopping on the scare train. Crime in New York has declined for 28 years straight and is at post-World War II levels. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Photos from the Harlem Light It Up parade. (amNewYork)

A LIRR train derailed on Friday night at Jamaica. There were no injuries, but the MTA is investigating what caused the derailment. This is the second derailment in that area on that track. (amNewYork)

With Mike Bloomberg getting into the presidential race, every NYC mayor since 1993 is or has run for president. Maybe David Dinkins has some ambitions we don’t know about. Either way, Bloomberg is in. (Patch)

Here’s his announcement video. (Bloomberg 2020)

A water main break caused flooding in Sunset Park on Sunday after a 30-foot wide crater opened up and shot out water for six hours. There were no injuries or major damage. (amNewYork)

The Coast Guard pulled 23 out of 32 ferries out of operation over “safety discrepancies” after annual inspections were performed on Sunday. Six ferries are back in the water. (amNewYork)

Someone posted a Times Square bomb threat to Reddit on Sunday morning. The threat was deemed not credible and the NYPD are investigating the post. (NY Times)

Where to go out for Thanksgiving dinner in NYC

Thanks to MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)