The Briefly for September 25-26, 2020 – The “Now You Annoyed the Anarchists” Friday Edition

Friday’s NYC news digest: The growing Covid-19 cluster neighborhoods, restaurant reviews return with no stars, Corey Johnson steps away from the mayoral race, and more

Today – Low: 66˚ High: 78˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 69˚ High: 76˚

10 big differences between fall in NYC this year vs. last year.” I bet I could think of at least one of them. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If we raise taxes on New Yorkers making more than a million a year, are they really gonna turn tail and leave? While the governor says he won’t raise their taxes for that very reason, he hasn’t shown any evidence that’s the case. Millionaires aren’t gonna choose to move to Hoboken because their taxes are high. That’s nobody’s first choice. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Even anarchists are annoyed that New York City was designated an anarchist jurisdiction. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Apartment Porn: This 5,500 square foot home in Brooklyn Heights is stunning, complete with a rooftop yoga studio, garden, and an indoor pool. For $8 million, it better be! (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Two Sunset Park meat purveyors face up to 20 years behind bars for pasting fake labels on their low-grade beef products to inflate their prices. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

After 21 years, the Amish Market in Tribeca is closing. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Brooklyn Municipal Building (I was married in that building) will be named after Ruth Bader Ginsberg. (NY1)

“Advocates for the LaGuardia AirTrain such as Gov. Cuomo and Port Authority Executive Director Rick Cotton promise a 30-minute or less connection from LaGuardia Airport to Manhattan via the AirTrain. It’s a myth.”
-Larry Penner, transportation advocate and historian, The Myth of the 30-Minute, One-Seat Ride on the LGA AirTrain for Streetsblog

The Times’ Pete Wells is back to writing restaurant reviews, but without any stars. This is similar to The Infatuation, who dropped its rating system while we’re in the end times. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Next week, the City Council will take up new legislation to potentially make outdoor dining permanent. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Did you know that NYC has a fruit-filled Instagram bakery scene? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Najhim Luke was indicted on second-degree murder and additional charges in the death of Brandon Hendricks, a 17-year-old high school basketball player who was shot in the Bronx by a stray bullet on June 28, 2020. (Norwood News)

According to a lawsuit, a CUNY graduate alleges that she was suspended after City Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo intervened in response to the student’s protest against Cumbo at a community board meeting last year. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

How many times have we said that the Industry City rezoning plan is dead? This time it’s actually dead. The developers have pulled their proposal. (Greg David The City)

The history of how the Industry City rezoning completely fell apart. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The MTA is looking to ban pooping on the subway. Does this mean that pooping on the subway is not currently banned? (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Responding to a tip in February 2019, the MTA discovered a a “man cave” was discovered underneath Grand Central Terminal, complete with couch, fridge, and TV. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A look at The Elevated Acre, a little patch of (fake) grass overlooking the water in the Financial District. (Marianne Howard for Untapped New York)

The Met Opera canceled its spring season. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

There have been Covid-19 cases in 100 NYC school buildings. (Charon Otterman for NY Times)

Two yeshivas will shut down amid a coronavirus spike in several neighborhoods in southern Brooklyn. (NY1)

Congrats to Borough Park, Far Rockaway, Flatbush, Kew Gardens, Midwood, and Williamsburg, the six neighborhoods the city will be focusing a “hyper-local effort” to increase testing and outreach to fight Covid-19. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“The ship has sailed. We’re headed toward another super spreading event.” Life in a Borough Park. (Jake Offenbartz for Gothamist)

“Last week, the New York City Council announced that it had passed a new bill allowing restaurants to add a COVID surcharge of 10 percent. The law will stay in place until 90 days after indoor dining is brought back to full capacity, but like so much else done over the past six months, it’s a gesture of help that does too little.”
-Chris Crowley, The COVID Recovery Surcharge Is a Farce for Grub Street

It’s not illegal to not wear a helmet while riding a bike in the city. Someone should tell these Barney Fifes who ticketed a cyclist for not wearing a helmet after being hit by a car. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The number of women running for the state Legislature has hit an all-time high, shattering the record set just two years ago. Good. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

The Gowanus Canal dredging is going to start mid-November. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

When’s the EPA’s cleanup of the Gowanus going to be finished? At least another dozen years. (Kevin Duggan for Brownstoner)

Eric Trump, the human toothpaste and orange juice combo, must testify in the state’s probe into the Trump Organization before the election on October 7. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Here is why Corey Johnson dropped out of the mayor’s race. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Video: The Krispy Kreme glaze waterfall in Time Square. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Governo Cuomo is back to what he’s doing best, talking shit about Mayor de Blasio’s inaction. This time, it’s focused on NYC being the only jurisdiction in the state that hasn’t started a mandated community dialogue on public safety. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

You knew it was coming: New Years Eve in Times Square is canceled. (Bill Pearls for BrooklynVegan)

15 exciting restaurants in Brooklyn open for outdoor dining. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 11-12, 2020 – The “Let’s Eat Some Indoor One Dollar Sushi” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining is coming back to NYC, sixteen teachers test positive for Covid-19 before students come back, outdoor happy hours, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 81˚
Rain and humid throughout the day.

16 New York City teachers have tested positive for Covid-19 in 16 different schools. Schools open on September 21. (East New York News)

Photos: Inside the abandoned City Hall subway station, which served as the inspiration for the Turtles’ lair in the second Ninja Turtles movie. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times asks the impolite question: What happens when no one invites you into their quarantine pod? (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

September 30, indoor dining is back at 25% capacity. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Indoor dining will increase to 50% on November 1 if cases don’t significantly increase, just in time for outdoor dining to end on October 31. The state and city, of course, are giving restaurants less than a month to get their indoor areas ready and overhaul their HVAC systems. Many restaurants will have to make a choice is opening their doors at 25% capacity is financially worth opening their doors at all. (Erika Adams for Eater)

An epidemiologist weighs in on the question of how safe is indoor dining? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There’s a new Whole Foods in Brooklyn, but no one is allowed inside. (Chris Crawley for Grub Street)

Okay, let’s jump into this. Is dollar sushi any good? (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A $5.75 million brownstone in Harlem with a secret garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Activists are calling on the MTA to fire two of their employees, Willion Wurm Jr and William Wurm, who drove through demonstrators near Times Square during a Black Lives Matter protest this summer. The MTA will not fire the employeees. (Stephan Nessen for Gothamist)

A look at the CDC’s eviction moratorium for tenants who can’t pay rent and make under $99,000 annually. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Farewell to the Hilton hotel in Times Square. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

What could make your commute worse between Bedford Ave and Manhattan? Someone who is FaceTiming the entire time. The L train tunnel is the first train tunnel to get cell signal. (Greenpointers)

Meet Jenny Olbrich, the Greenpoint’s Pizza Girl. (Greenpointers)

A look at the “For ⟶ forever” mural by Mierle Laderman Ukeles that’s on display outside the Queens Museum. (Jane Margolies for NY Times)

Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia were added to New York’s quarantine list for travelers. (NY1)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer officially kicked off his 2021 mayoral bid on Tuesday with a speech taking aim at the city’s real estate industry. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

It’s that wonderful time of the year again: It’s time for goats to cut the grass. (EV Grieve)

As the title says, “Everything you need to know about NYC’s Open Streets Restaurants program.” (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A 15-year-old Brooklyn boy was charged on Tuesday with five counts of attempted murder in a J’Ouvert shooting that left a 6-year-old boy, his mother, and three men wounded. (Ed Shanahan and Ashley Southall for NY Times)

James Gordon Bennett Medal is one of the FDNY’s highest honors, but it’s named for the published of The New York Herald newspaper, who pushed racist and segregationist views during the Civil War. The award will be renamed in honor of Chief Peter J. Ganci, who was the highest-ranked uniformed member of the FDNY killing in the 9/11 attacks. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Christian Cooper, the bird watcher who had the police called on him for insisting a dog be put on a leash. has turned his experience into a graphic novel about racism. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Did you miss the earthquake that happened early in the morning on Wednesday? Yes, there was an earthquake. Just toss it on the pile for 2020. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Angry Upper West Siders that threatened to sue the city after homeless shelter residents were temporarily moved into neighborhood hotels are celebrating the decision to move the 300 residents of one hotel back into traditional shelter facilities. NIMBY indeed. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Patricia Marroquin Norby is the Met’s first-ever full-time Native American curator and will assume the role of associate curator for Native American art. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

The Covid-19 pandemic hit NYC neighborhoods the hardest that were already experiencing the greatest rent burden, according to new research from StreetEasy. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Meet “Red Rage” Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack, who has the most credible misconduct allegations of any NYPD officer. Over a dozen Black and Latino men accused McCormack of touching them inappropriately during searches or ordered others to do so. Despite the complaints, he kept being promoted. (Joaquin Sapien for The City)

A guide to Central Park’s “Great Trees.” (Amanda Quaid for Untapped Cities)

Some gyms are open in the city, but indoor fitness classes remain banned. A group of boutique fitness studios is suing the city for $250 million in damages over the ban (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Ride the subway without a mask? $50 fine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Century 21 declared bankruptcy and will be closing its stores. (Christopher Bonanos for Curbed)

A new study from the CDC says adults with Covid-19 were twice as likely to say they ate at a restaurant. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán launched her campaign for City Council for district 22, which encompasses Astoria, East Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Rikers Island. If she wins her election, it would put her in control of rezoning Rikers Island after it has been vacated. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The outdoor happy hour guide. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 25, 2020 – The “Beaches Will Open on July 1” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 23 more miles of open streets, the best and worst of takeout and delivery, the MTA moves to stop all construction projects, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 84˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

It took the threat of the City Council forcing his hand, but Mayor de Blasio announced the city’s beaches will fully open on July 1. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Anyone traveling to New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut from states with Covid-19 outbreaks must undergo a 14-day isolation period under threat of fines that range from $2,000 to $10,000. It was announced at noon on Wednesday and went into effect at midnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The New York Marathon was canceled for 2020 and hopes to return in 2021. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

The best and worst of NYC takeout and delivery. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 hiking trails in the city to try this summer. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A spokesperson for New York City’s largest charter network resigned in protest, stating she can no longer defend Success Academy’s “racist and abusive practices” that are “detrimental to the emotional well being” of its students. (Alex Zimmerman for ChalkBeat)

New York is one of three states that is “close” to containing the coronavirus, according to the group Covid Act Now. New Jersey and Massachusetts are the other two. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The MTA is exploring the idea of using artificial intelligence to track how many subway riders are wearing face masks. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The MTA, being the MTA, is stopped all planned upgrades to subways and installing new elevators because of its financial situation. Nothing says “planning for the future” like “no updates to an already crumbling system.” Some of these repairs include bringing subway stations into compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, structural repairs to the 7 line, which was falling apart in Queens before the pandemic, and updating the signals on the A/C/E lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Say hello to the idea of the Queens Ribbon, a proposed new bridge that would like Long Island City, Roosevelt Island, and Midtown Manhattan for pedestrians and cyclists. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Major League Baseball agreed with the players union and “spring” training starts on July 1 for a 60 game season that will start on July 23 or 24. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Stonewall Inn is facing an “uncertain future” and started up a second GoFundMe to raise $100,000. Their first GoFundMe is for the staff. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Farewell to the Times Square McDonalds after 17 years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The Times throws some cold water on the fireworks conspiracies. Phantom Fireworks, one of the largest warehouses in PA is running a buy-one-get-two-free sale. (Mihir Zaveri, Allie Conti and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

The percentages of Black members of the NYPD have grown among captains or above and lieutenants, but the percentage of Black officers has fallen since 2008 among sergeants, detectives, and patrol officers. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

A look at NYPD’s use of helicopters for intimidation and surveillance during George Floyd protests, occasionally flying only 100 over sea level. Each helicopter is equipped with infrared cameras and a laptop that can zoom in on individual faces. The FAA recommends helicopters fly at an altitude of 1,0000 at the lowest. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

A new study from The Health Department shows the city underreported NYPD-related deaths, including a dozen deaths of unarmed people of color over five years. Between 2010 and 2015, the number was reported as 46, but research shows identified 105 deaths. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

When an NYPD SUV drove into a group of protesters, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says they didn’t violate policy and they came out with “no injuries to anyone.” (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

“Last Halloween, my wife and then-6-year-old daughter were making their way home after trick-or-treating in Brooklyn. Suddenly, an unmarked NYPD car with sirens wailing began speeding against traffic up a one-way street, our neighborhood’s main thoroughfare. The officer seemed to be going after a few teenage boys.

Then, in an instant, the car hit one of the kids.”
-Eric Umansky for ProPublica, My Family Saw a Police Car Hit a Kid on Halloween. Then I Learned How NYPD Impunity Works.

Starting Tuesday night, activists have occupied City Hall Park with a plan to stay through the end of the month, calling for a reduction in the NYPD’s budget by $1 billion. (Sydney Pereira and Scott Heins for Gothamist)

The city will paint a Black Lives Matter mural on the street in front of Trump Tower. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Photos: The history of the Dyke March. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

New York City does not plan to offer in-person classes this summer for students with disabilities. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Mayor de Blasio announced 23 miles of new open streets, including nine miles of temporarily protected bike lanes. It brings the total milage to 67, short of his promise to open 100 miles by the end of this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor announced the city might have to lay off or furlough 22,000 municipal workers this fall to help close the city’s budget gap. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

After another mess of an election day in NYC, there is another round of calls to reform how we vote to make elections more inclusive and fair. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re planning on doing outdoor dining, check ahead to see if you’ll need reservations. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

10 excellent places for takeout in Queens. (Joe DeStefano for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Ryan for sending in today’s featured photo!