The Briefly for January 17, 2020 – The Weekend “El Bloombito Will Not Be Bought!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The 7 train announements are now sponsored, the mayor delays on filling his MTA board seats, mystery gumball machines appear on Avenue A, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 31˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 25˚ High: 38˚

As part of an ad campaign for a new show, Awkwafina recorded announcements for stops on the 7 train. The MTA considers this a pilot program for future campaigns. There are, of course, jokes. These jokes might be funny the first time you’ll hear them. Maybe even the second or third time, but when you’re late for work because the brand new signals on the train have failed because of a light dusting of snow, hearing a joke about 69-ing might be the thing to finally send you over the edge. Of course, this is assuming you can hear the announcements at all. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New Yorkers, of course, have opinions on the advertising campaign. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Video: Hear the announcements for yourself. (ActionKid)

@ElBloombito will not be bought! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How to order a bagel, even if your order is wrong. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

The full Governors Ball lineup was announced for June 5-7 on Randall’s Island. Tickets go on sale today at noon. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

10 best places to work remotely in NYC. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

A guided walk through Brooklyn Heights to Cher’s house in Moonstruck, Love Lane, Truman Capote’s house, and other neighborhood highlights. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Behold: The Hot Milkman. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Carlos Beltran “stepped down” from his job as manager of the Mets as a result of his involvement as one of the major contributors to the 2017 sign-stealing Houston Astros. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Review: The Carnegie Diner, which opened this week across the street from Carnegie Hall, puts a trendy twist on the classic diner menu. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Details are beginning to emerge about Yayoi Kusama’s “KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature” exhibition at the New York Botanical Garden this summer. Paintings, sculptures, and the artist’s signature Infinity Rooms will be a part of the exhibition in what will surely be the Instagram hit of the summer. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

What are these mystery gumball machines on Avenue A? (EV Grieve)

A coalition that includes attorneys general in 14 states, the District of Columbia and New York City are suing the Agriculture Department over a plan to impose stricter work requirements on millions of food stamp recipients. (Catherine Boudreau for Politico)

If Uncut Gems was your type of movie, the Safdie Brothers released a short starring Adam Sandler about two street performers in Times Square called GOLDMAN v SILVERMAN. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Domino Sugar Refinery is a literal shell of its former self in the first step of its transformation into an office building. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

Thursday ended a horrific 24 hours in Brooklyn as three pedestrians were killed by motorists. The first killed by the driver of an SUV in the crosswalk in Clinton Hill, the second killed by the driver of a private sanitation truck in Bensonhurst in a hit and run, and the third killed by the driver of a bus after she fell out of the bus and was subsequently run over by it. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Snowy Village could bring corn dogs back in trend in the city with a Korean take on the classic beach food. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Who is to blame for these deaths? If you listen to Police Department Deputy Chief Charles Scholl of Patrol Borough Brooklyn South, the pedestrians killed should have been more “careful.” (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

A Long Island woman died Thursday after a sheet of plywood blew off scaffolding and struck her in the head. Xiang Ji, 67, was fatally struck by the plywood which fell from a building on Main Street near 41st Road in Flushing. No one asked Deputy Scholl if she was careful enough. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Congrats to ROLLN in Flatiron for creating the world’s largest nigiri sushi, weighing in at 70 pounds. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

41 percent of all New York City schools — 755 in total — are more segregated than their neighborhoods according to a new report from the Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Eagle)

A new installation in collaboration with MoMA in the 5th Avenue/53rd Street subway station shows off the history of mass transit’s iconography and signage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is in-unit laundry the ultimate NYC apartment amenity? (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Fearing the state’s $6 billion deficit, the mayor unveiled a city budget with the smallest percent increase during his tenure as mayor. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

NYCHA’s heat outages are still abysmal, but they’re already much better than last year. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

As Barneys completes its slow march towards retail death, workers haven’t received information about a closing date, severance pay or benefits. (Sapna Maheshwari for NY Times)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected to unveil a proposal to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters in New York state at his budget address next Tuesday. (NY1)

Mayor de Blasio hasn’t filled his two MTA board appointments that are vacant and won’t before next week’s first two board meetings of the year. Good thing he has time to tweet about make believe bagel orders and chime in on memes about seating on subways, but can’t fill vacancies that have been open since June and November. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best cocktail bars in the city. (Sarah Probst for Thrillist)

The Briefly for January 6, 2020 – The “Y2K Bug Arrives in NYC 20 Years Late” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The state’s new elevator safety law, a new minimum wage for (some) tipped workers, a Times Square institution closed, Brooklyn’s hottest restaurants, & more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 46˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

New York is the latest state to enact a state-wide elevator safety law, calling for state oversight of the elevator industry, establishing standards for elevator contractors, mechanics, and inspectors. Anyone think it’s weird this didn’t already exist? (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It’s hard not to make Y2K jokes when the city’s parking meters stopped accepting credit cards on January 1, 2020. This is the second time in a year that a city’s system has malfunctioned as a result of a lack up upgrading software. (BenYakas for Gothamist)

Speaking of parking tickets, Corey Johnson is proposing a “day fine” system, which is common in Europe. Instead of a fixed fee, which unfairly burdens low-income people, fines would be representative of a percentage of a person’s daily income. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo vetoed the Securing Wages Earned Against Theft bill that would have allowed employees to freeze the assets of their employer while a wage theft case is pending. (Max Parrot for QNS)

Meet Josh and Benny Safdie, the directing duo behind Uncut Gems. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Did you know there’s a secret H subway train? It was renamed to the Rockaway Park Shuttle in 1993, but it’s still out there if you look carefully. (Tribeca Citizen)

12 new public art installations not to miss in January. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

The mayor’s reaction to multiple deaths on Third Avenue in Brooklyn is to lower the speed limit from 30mph to 25mph. Lowering the speed limit without enforcement is akin to doing nothing, so the mayor has also promised a step up in enforcement. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Chepe, the Nevins Street raccoon was captured. He’ll be living out his days known as Chepe, the Prospect Park raccoon. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The state has a new minimum wage law for tipped workers, which doesn’t include restaurant or bar workers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

A look at the city’s new bail reforms from inside Manhattan’s criminal court. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A deep look at why some parents are freaking out about the city’s potential scrapping of the Gifted and Talented program. (Emily Shwake for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside The Deco, Midtown West’s new food hall. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The 13-year-old arrested in connection with Tessa Majors’s murder was denied a pre-trial release. and will remain in custody while awaiting the trial. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Times Square features the ridiculous version of everything. $30 Domino’s pizzas. A Red Lobster. And the planned TSX hotel will include an outdoor stage and ball drop suites. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Say farewell to the last of the “meat honkeytonks” in Times Square, Tad’s Steaks. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The Queens Public Library on the first floor of One Court Square will be closing at the end of the month. The library’s been in that location since 1989. If you remember, the building was supposed to become Amazon’s temporary office while their Long Island City campus was built, but since the deal fell through the developer of the building is making other plans. The library is looking for a new home. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

A dozen illuminated seesaws are coming to Broadway today (Monday) between 37th and 38th as part of the installation “Impulse.” The seesaws will create light and make music as well. Adding an installation in that spot is an annual tradition. Last year’s installation was an illuminated tunnel you could walk through that made sounds as people walked through it. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York is a city of signs, but of very few sign-painters. Travis Fitzsimmons of Prospect Lefferts Gardens makes hand-painted signs whose simplicity and style catch eyes. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Pizza Paradise, the nondescript and honestly sub-par pizza place in Flatiron, holds a secret. Inside is also Taste of Persia, which will be closing at the end of the month due to being told to close by the new owners. Owner Said Pourkay is looking for a new space. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Hells Angels’ supporters used to claim the block that housed their clubhouse on E 3rd was the safest block in the city. Some unknown gunmen tested that theory at their new clubhouse in Throggs Neck late on Thursday night. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Video: A look inside Joe’s Shanghai legendary soup dumplings. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The process hasn’t officially begun, but parents in Queens are organizing against desegregating schools in Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, Rego Park, and Jamaica. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Grand Street bike lane in Brooklyn is being upgraded today to physically separate cyclists from moving traffic and prevent drivers from parking in the bike lane. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

It’s the most mulch-iest time of year. (EV Grieve)

Fairway Market is filing for bankruptcy again. (David Cunningham for I Love the Upper West Side)

The city showed its support for the Jewish community over the weekend with a nearly 20,000 person march across the Brooklyn Bridge into Manhattan. (Christina Goldbaum and Matthew Sedacca for NY Times)

Photos: Inside the new East Village Trader Joe’s. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

A Chinatown bus with a station on Canal Street was involved in a horrific traffic accident early Sunday morning in Southwest Pennsylvania that killed five and injured sixty. (Bowery Boogie)

How can you make finding an apartment even less fun than it already is? Add Excel and decision matrices. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

You’ve got all week to prepare yourself. This weekend is The No Pants Subway Ride. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

In another depressing blow to sources of local news, amNewYork and Metro will be combining into one newspaper under the Schneps Media banner. It seems like Metro’s website will be eaten by amNewYork’s, which has been increasing filled using Associated Press stories instead of local reporters. The announcement doesn’t include the number of layoffs that will be involved. (amNewYork)

The hottest restaurants in Brooklyn for January. (Eater)

The Briefly for January 2, 2020 – The “De Blasio Argues $30 Pizza, Not the $51 Billion MTA Plan” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 2020’s new laws, a tribute to Tom’s Restaurant, the MTA embrace’s “Train Daddy” Andy Byford, Prohibition Bakery closes, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 47˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Photos: Times Square celebrates the coming of a new decade. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Why does anyone camp out all day in Times Square to watch the ball drop? Here are some answers. (Jen Chung, who got the Times Square assignment, for Gothamist)

Photos: Cleaning up Times Square. (Ben Yakas, Gretchen Robinette for Gothamist)

A full 2020 calendar of meteor showers, supermoons and lunar events you can see from the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Welcome to Little Aidan Zobnin and Anthony Saraceno Jr., New York City’s midnight babies for 2020. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork)

Election Day. When is the NYC Marathon? When does the U.S. Open start? Comic Con is what days? A look ahead at major events in the city for 2020. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork)

Five laws that will hit the city in 2020: the plastic bag ban, $15 minimum wage for all, cash bail, the end of pot testing, and pre-registering to vote for teens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

More new laws coming this year: Discovery reform and the end of “blindfold laws,” insurance companies will be required to cover in vitro-fertilization and adoptees can access their birth certificates after turning 18. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

“Another Tech Guy Tries to Disrupt Food Space” and other predicted 2020 headlines from Eater’s peanut gallery. (Eater)

Clamoring for more holiday cheer? A list of the best holiday pop-up bars in NYC. Most are open this weekend. (Bao Ong with Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Is one of your 2020 resolutions to get more civically involved? Here’s how to join your community board. (Curbed)

Mayor de Blasio has the opportunity to directly influence the MTA’s $51 billion capital plan for 2020-2024, but he is declining to be directly involved. Everyone else with appointment power for the review board has named themselves at the governor’s request. Thanks for stepping up and representing the city Mr. Mayor. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

The mayor doesn’t want to get involved in the MTA’s capital plan, he’ll get involved in trying to shame Domino’s for selling $30 pizzas in Times Square on New Year’s Eve. The mayor, never one to have a connection with the city he’s supposed to be in charge of, seems to forget that most pizzas in Times Square, albeit not from Domino’s, costs around $30. (Lee Moran for HuffPost)

An illustrated tribute to Tom’s Diner in Prospect Heights. (Jessica Olien for NY Times)

Even the MTA has begun using the nickname Train Daddy for President Andy Byford. (@nyctsubway)

Photos: The 2020 Coney Island New Year’s Day Polar Bear Plunge. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Video: Take a walk from Brooklyn Bridge Park to Chinatown with a 360° view. (ActionKid)

Sometimes the performer on the subway is playing the didgeridoo, sometimes it’s the equivalent of a punk rock music festival. (The Villager)

Elon Musk spent last week being a genius inventor on Twitter, coming up with the idea… for the subway. What a genius! Traveling underground! (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Video: How much wind is too much? Watch a wind turbine in Co-op City fall apart under heavy winds. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

It took a death, but the Department of Buildings is doubling the size of their facade inspection team from 12 to 24. Every building in the city over six stories has to undergo a physical inspection. That still seems like it isn’t enough. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYPD’s Michael J. Reynolds, a white man, traveled to Nashville for a bachelor party and ended up kicking in a black woman’s door while drunk, threatening her and her sons with a racist slur and violence. He was sentenced to 15 days in jail and three years’ probation. There’s a petition signed by 10,000 people calling for his firing, but he’s still an officer. As a reminder, it took five years for Daniel Pantaleo to be fired. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

Northeast Queens’ biggest stories to watch in 2020. (Jenna Bagcal for QNS)

Nightmare: A 36-year-old fell 15 feet off the roof of a building on Mott Street and was trapped between two buildings. She was rescued from between the buildings and her name has not been released. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Prohibition Bakery, the boozy bakery in the basement of Subject Bar on Suffolk St, closed on Christmas Day. It’s a different story than most closings, instead of rent it was “an enormous drain of time and energy, and frankly had stopped bringing me any real happiness.” (Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

Having defeated Airbnb, the Hotels Trade Council is happy to accept its role as a political heavyweight. It’s the latest focus is to convince the City Council to require hotels to acquire a special permit to essentially ban the construction of new hotels. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Republican State Assembly Minority Leader Brian Kolbys wrote an op-ed urging New Yorkers not to drink and drive. He was arrested on New Year’s Eve after crashing his car while drunk just outside of Rochester. (NY 1)

Chicken and waffles. Eggs Benedict. Meatloaf sandwich. 18 hangover-busting dishes. (Eater)