The Briefly for June 25, 2020 – The “Beaches Will Open on July 1” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 23 more miles of open streets, the best and worst of takeout and delivery, the MTA moves to stop all construction projects, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 84˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

It took the threat of the City Council forcing his hand, but Mayor de Blasio announced the city’s beaches will fully open on July 1. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Anyone traveling to New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut from states with Covid-19 outbreaks must undergo a 14-day isolation period under threat of fines that range from $2,000 to $10,000. It was announced at noon on Wednesday and went into effect at midnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The New York Marathon was canceled for 2020 and hopes to return in 2021. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

The best and worst of NYC takeout and delivery. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 hiking trails in the city to try this summer. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A spokesperson for New York City’s largest charter network resigned in protest, stating she can no longer defend Success Academy’s “racist and abusive practices” that are “detrimental to the emotional well being” of its students. (Alex Zimmerman for ChalkBeat)

New York is one of three states that is “close” to containing the coronavirus, according to the group Covid Act Now. New Jersey and Massachusetts are the other two. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The MTA is exploring the idea of using artificial intelligence to track how many subway riders are wearing face masks. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The MTA, being the MTA, is stopped all planned upgrades to subways and installing new elevators because of its financial situation. Nothing says “planning for the future” like “no updates to an already crumbling system.” Some of these repairs include bringing subway stations into compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, structural repairs to the 7 line, which was falling apart in Queens before the pandemic, and updating the signals on the A/C/E lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Say hello to the idea of the Queens Ribbon, a proposed new bridge that would like Long Island City, Roosevelt Island, and Midtown Manhattan for pedestrians and cyclists. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Major League Baseball agreed with the players union and “spring” training starts on July 1 for a 60 game season that will start on July 23 or 24. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Stonewall Inn is facing an “uncertain future” and started up a second GoFundMe to raise $100,000. Their first GoFundMe is for the staff. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Farewell to the Times Square McDonalds after 17 years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The Times throws some cold water on the fireworks conspiracies. Phantom Fireworks, one of the largest warehouses in PA is running a buy-one-get-two-free sale. (Mihir Zaveri, Allie Conti and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

The percentages of Black members of the NYPD have grown among captains or above and lieutenants, but the percentage of Black officers has fallen since 2008 among sergeants, detectives, and patrol officers. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

A look at NYPD’s use of helicopters for intimidation and surveillance during George Floyd protests, occasionally flying only 100 over sea level. Each helicopter is equipped with infrared cameras and a laptop that can zoom in on individual faces. The FAA recommends helicopters fly at an altitude of 1,0000 at the lowest. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

A new study from The Health Department shows the city underreported NYPD-related deaths, including a dozen deaths of unarmed people of color over five years. Between 2010 and 2015, the number was reported as 46, but research shows identified 105 deaths. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

When an NYPD SUV drove into a group of protesters, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says they didn’t violate policy and they came out with “no injuries to anyone.” (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

“Last Halloween, my wife and then-6-year-old daughter were making their way home after trick-or-treating in Brooklyn. Suddenly, an unmarked NYPD car with sirens wailing began speeding against traffic up a one-way street, our neighborhood’s main thoroughfare. The officer seemed to be going after a few teenage boys.

Then, in an instant, the car hit one of the kids.”
-Eric Umansky for ProPublica, My Family Saw a Police Car Hit a Kid on Halloween. Then I Learned How NYPD Impunity Works.

Starting Tuesday night, activists have occupied City Hall Park with a plan to stay through the end of the month, calling for a reduction in the NYPD’s budget by $1 billion. (Sydney Pereira and Scott Heins for Gothamist)

The city will paint a Black Lives Matter mural on the street in front of Trump Tower. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Photos: The history of the Dyke March. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

New York City does not plan to offer in-person classes this summer for students with disabilities. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Mayor de Blasio announced 23 miles of new open streets, including nine miles of temporarily protected bike lanes. It brings the total milage to 67, short of his promise to open 100 miles by the end of this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor announced the city might have to lay off or furlough 22,000 municipal workers this fall to help close the city’s budget gap. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

After another mess of an election day in NYC, there is another round of calls to reform how we vote to make elections more inclusive and fair. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re planning on doing outdoor dining, check ahead to see if you’ll need reservations. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

10 excellent places for takeout in Queens. (Joe DeStefano for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Ryan for sending in today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 17, 2020 – The “Every Hour is Happy Hour When Time is Meaningless” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city’s budget goes wartime, the best brunch options for delivery, high end stores are boarding up their windows, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 51˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 41˚ High: 63˚

4K VIdeo: Walking through Times Square. (ActionKid)

In honor of his late grandmother, Michael Che will be paying May’s rent for the 160 apartments in the NYCHA building where she lived. (Ron Dicker for HuffPost)

Rent in the city dropped 6% since the start since March 22. (Localize.City)

Tenant groups are set for a rent strike on May 1. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Sick of sourdough? Here are seven bread options for you to try. (Sam O’Brien for Atlas Obscura)

The allure and anxiety of drinking along in quarantine. (Alice Feriring for Grub Street)

What time is it okay to start drinking alcohol? It’s hard to tell because time has no meaning anymore. (Shayla Love for VICE)

Slowly, the city’s government is finding a way to move forward. The City Council and the Landmarks Preservation Commission will start meeting digitally next week. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Taxi drivers were struggling before the pandemic. With COVID-19, they face even more difficulties. (Estefania Hernandez for NY1)

Are you willing to go to a live sport without a vaccine? 61% of sports fans and 71% of people overall are unwilling to go until there’s a vaccine. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Keith McNally’s Lucky Strike on Grand Street is closed for good. Is it the first domino to fall when it comes to independent restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

From former Roberta’s and Speedy Romeo chef Robert Guimond comes Public Display of Affection, a wood-fired pizza spot in Park Slope on Union Street. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio released a revised “wartime” budget on Thursday, with a $6 billion reduction. “A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor when speaking about his budget. Last year he said, “Placard abuse erodes faith in government and has no place in our city.” This year he’s eliminating the Placard Abuse Enforcement Team. Activist Charles Komanoff has a different idea: Disband the Collision Investigation Squad instead. (Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog)

Workers at two luxury Manhattan residential buildings, The Chamberlain and 432 West 52nd Street, walked out on the job, claiming poor work conditions and harassment. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

It’s easy to think that artists should use this time to create something new, but the reality of the moment can be much heavier than imaginable. This is Rori Nogee’s story of going from having six jobs and a show ready to open on Restaurant Row to a 100% loss of income and opportunities. (Rori Nogee for New York Cliche)

A look at what might be New York City’s last open bookstore. (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

I first saw it from a friend’s story on Instagram, the boarded-up stores in Manhattan. It’s a pandemic, not The Purge. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Pizza bagels? Pizza rolls? Please. Forget it, now pizza cupcakes are ready for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Tired of the same old views? Check out the livestreams of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“It should be stated bluntly that traveling on the New York subway system is now one of the more frightful experiences Western civilization has to offer on a regular basis. The experience is not only intolerable. It is also a daily advertisement for the brutish sensibilities and shallow brainpans of the people who now control the city.” “Why We Hate the Subways,” despite being timely, was written in 1977. (Alexander Cockburn for Village Voice)

Thank goodness for people like the non-profit Greenpoint Cats, who have been doing their best to look after bodega cats left behind or abandoned as bodegas close. (Aaron Simon for Greenpointers)

10 great sandwiches still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found floating in the East River near Roosevelt Island. (Emily Davenpont for QNS)

New York remains on PAUSE until at least May 15. (Kathleen Culliton for PAtch)

Reports of domestic violence have dropped dramatically across the city, and that’s not a good thing. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

Watch New Yorkers sing “New York, New York” out their windows after Thursday’s 7 pm clap, a project of the Peace of Heart Choir. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In what started as a cheap way to live, an $800-a-month illegal bedroom in Bushwick with no windows now sounds more like a cruel experiment. (Trey Taylor for Curbed)

Do you miss Shake Shack? Here’s the recipe for the ShackBurger and ShackSauce. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The best brunch options in NYC available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for January 31, 2020 – The Weekend “Three Story Tall Taco Ball in Midtown” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Breaking car culture on the BQE, Decolonize This Place wants to “f**k s**t up” on the subways, a Dolly Parton cover band reviews a Dolly Parton bar and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 44˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 45˚

Decolonize This Place plans to “fuck shit up” on the subways today. The group declared the 31st as a day of protest to send the message that New York will not tolerate the surge of police on the subways. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

100 bus stations in 18 neighborhoods across the city will sport a photo exhibition from artist Farah Al Qasimi called Back and Forth Disco, which celebrates “individuality and the aesthetic choices that make spaces and surroundings uniquely personal.” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

De Blasio’s panel focused on what to do with the crumbling BQE has a recommendation: Preserve the Brooklyn Promenade and close one lane in either direction, limiting the amount of traffic that can be on the road and encourage diversions. The recommendations are for the remaining time the BQE stands, but it will have to be replaced at some point in the future. If the city wants to break car culture, things have to get worse for drivers before it gets better for everyone. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Is Midtown ready for a three story Taco Bell Cantina? (Nicholas Rizzi for Commercial Observer)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has a plan for universal affordable housing. The mayoral hopeful’s plan would require a quarter of new apartments in any development with more than 10 apartments be set aside for tenants earning 60% of the area median income or $58,000 a year for a family of three. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

The most “affordable” neighborhood in Manhattan is Washington Heights, where you’ll only pay $652 per square foot. (emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Four Queens borough president candidates have been eliminated from the ballot, leaving Consta Constantinides, Elizabeth Crowler, Jim Quinn, and Dao Yin for March 24. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Nearly 2,000 kids might not be able to find a kindergarten to meet their needs this spring, amid a shortage of space in special education pre-K classrooms, according to a new study released Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Dermot Shea is the city’s first NYPD commissioner registered with a political party. in over 30 years. Does the Republican Shea support the president’s anti-immigration policies? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The Times Square Valentine Heart Design Competition winner was unveiled on Thursday. Heart Squared is a 125 mirror installation arranged in the shape of a heart and is in Father Duffy Square in Times Square. Check it out the next time someone tricks you into going there. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn Eagle fired four employees, their editor-in-chief Ned Berke, managing editor Sara Bosworth, reporter Meaghan McGoldrick, and growth manager Cambria Roth, in what seems to be a combination of a failed attempt to secure investment and the publisher of the company’s issues with “woke journalism.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The First National City Bank building, on the corner of Canal and Broadway, will become Mercato Fabbrica, a 35,000-square-foot Italian-style food hall, with groceries, a tea parlor, coffee house, nano-brewery, boutique, rooftop terrace, and a “culinary social club with cowering lounge”. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Using the Tessa Majors murder as a backdrop, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is calling for every school in the city to have a full-time social worker. The three suspects in the case are all teenage boys who were attending P.S. 180 in Manhattan. P.S. 180 has 500 students and until recently had only been served by a single part-time social worker. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Who better to review a Dolly Parton-themed bar than Doll Parts, a Dolly Parton cover band. (Maggie Robinson Katz and Julie Sirna-Frest for Brooklyn Paper)

In a “just when you thought it couldn’t get worse” scenario, a Brooklyn mother’s day went from “no good” to “very bad” very quickly. One of her children got sick and puked on a bus, which was taken out of service. On the street, another passenger on the bus pulled a knife and slashed her face before running off. The mother went to Brookdale Hospital for the slash. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say hello to the four new flavors at Van Leeuwen: marionberry cheesecake, Irish cream, ginger lemon poppy seed crumble, and churros & fudge. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Video: Maybe We Woke Up: The Saving of Neir’s Tavern, a six minute documentary. (Christopher Ming Ryan and Evan Fairbanks)

The NYPD is sending high ranking officers to talk to the public to scare monger against the state’s new bail reforms. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

Shakespeare in the Park announced its shows in its 2020 season: Richard II and As You Like It (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

When contemplating a cab vs a Lyft/Uber, you weight the options. The inconvenience but lower price of a cab vs the convenience and potential surge pricing of a Lyft/Uber. Throw that out the window, because a panel is set to recommend surge pricing for taxis. (NY Times)

The best meals for around $20 on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Murat for today’s featured photo!