The Briefly for August 8, 2019 – The “Boycotting Mega Rich Trump Supporters is Messy Business” Edition

How to research apartment buildings, One World Trade’s scent, stand-out dishes in the West Village, Cuomo tries to change the gun conversation and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

How should the city’s justice system fight gun violence? The NYPD and Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez have differing opinions, and no matter how difficult it is for them to see eye-to-eye on the matter, no one can ignore that shootings are up 10% and gun arrests are up 91% in Brooklyn. (NY Times)

It was a mass panic in Times Square as people fled for safety, storming bars or theaters, literally anywhere to escape what sounded like gunshots. It was a motorcycle backfiring. (NY Times)

You might be surprised how many playgrounds are built on top of cemeteries. (Untapped Cities)

On Wednesday, the outrage machine was aimed at Stephen Ross, the billionaire behind the Hudson Yards whose company owns Equinox, who is hosting a fundraiser for President Trump this weekend to the tune of a quarter-million dollars per person. People are calling on Equinox members to cancel their memberships, but if you’re looking to boycott businesses Ross has investments in, you better make a list, because it starts with SoulCycle, Momofuku, Milk Bar, &pizza, Beyond Sushi, and Bluestone Lane before you get into the companies his company invested in. When it comes to the mega-rich, boycotting is a messy business. (Eater)

Interested in finding out who you know that donated to Trump? Here’s an easy set of instructions to follow to make family gatherings really awkward this year. (Splinter)

Now that the primary is officially over, Melinda Katz is focused on the Queens DA election. (amNY)

If we’ve learned anything from the Katz/Cabán DA primary battle, it is that all votes count in NYC and everyone has to be extremely careful to make sure they fill out their ballots, affidavit or not, properly. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is attempting to shape the Democratic Primary by asking all candidates to endorse a list of gun reforms including banning assault weapons, creating a database to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing weapons, expanding buybacks, and “red flag” legislation that would allow individuals to seek court orders preventing others from buying guns. (Politico)

After a brief suspension, @placardabuse is back on Twitter, documenting all the different ways that cars with parking placards regularly abuse the privileges their placards may grant them. (Streetsblog)

12 stand-out dishes to try in the West Village. (Eater)

Where does the water go when you flush? Easy question, complex answer. (amNY)

One World Trade’s observatory has a scent, and it’s there on purpose. (NY Times)

How to research a building before you move in. You don’t want the reason that two-bedroom apartment is cheap to be because of the awful history of bedbug infestations. (Curbed)

An interview with State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, Brooklyn’s last standing elected Republican. She’s running for Congress to try to unseat Max Rose, possibly leaving the entire borough solidly blue in the process. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Sunshine Cinema building on the Lower East Side has been completely demolished. (Curbed)

The woman who was arrested and had her one-year-old son pulled out of her hands for sitting on the floor at a benefits office has, as expected, sued the city, the officers involved, the HRA and the NYPD. (Politico)

The city’s taxi regulators voted to approve the cap on ride-hailing app vehicles and limited how long drivers can wait for fares in Manhattan. In six months, the commission will evaluate if they should issue new licenses. (Patch)

Finding a pool table at a bar is getting more and rarer, but the tables are far from gone. (amNY)

Last week a judge recommended Daniel Pantaleo be fired for using an illegal chokehold that lead to Eric Garner’s death. One week later the protests have begun as the mayor has remained silent and the city waits for action from commissioner James O’Neill. (amNY)

The DOT announced a speed-up in the timeline for installing protected bike lanes on 4th Ave in Brooklyn, connecting Bay Ridge to Park Slope and will do so by the end of this year. While the city will never get Em Samolewicz back after she was killed by a driver in Sunset Park, her death isn’t going without action from the city to protect other cyclists from meeting the same fate. (Curbed)

A fund to honor Em at Third Root Community Health Center is being established that will welcome trans women & trans femmes to receive healing services from Third Root at no cost. Em was an admin staff member since 2016. (GoFundMe)

A farm? On Staten Island? Yes, and it’s part of the amenities. (The Real Deal)

Raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers hasn’t hurt the restaurant industry as a whole, despite protests to the contrary every time it’s proposed. (amNY)

A group of rent-stabilized tenants in the Lower East Side and Williamsburg are accusing their landlord of continuing with eviction harassment, illegal overcharges, and preferential rent hikes—despite New York’s recently passed rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

Thousands of children, parents and staff members from the Harlem Children’s Zone marched in this year’s Children’s March for Peace. The match started after an elementary school girl was hit with a stray bullet inside her apartment 25 years ago and with the recent rise in gun violence across the city and country, its message is needed more than ever. (amNY)

The mayor announced $9 million to revitalize social services in Brownsville in response to the recent mass shooting for anti-gun violence programs, to enhance response times from the Brooklyn Action Center, youth education programs, to hire more staff for the recreation center, and more. Last week Jumaane Williams called for more funding and not police to address future problems in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 12 hottest lunch spots right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 24, 2019 – The “In Defense of a New York City Summer” Edition

What was on and what was off the state’s legislative agenda, the summer forecast, the Mermaid Parade, pity the real estate investors, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions are over, just in time for late-night weekday disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Democrats, you have the chance to vote for your next District Attorney primary on Tuesday. Last minute dropouts, endorsements, and ads are setting the candidates apart from each other. (Politico)

Candidate Tiffany Cabán is following the AOC playbook to a possible Queens DA election victory. It helps she’s also received AOC’s endorsement. (NY Times)

In 2017, lead was found in the water fountains in multiple city schools. In a small investigation in four schools, WNYC found high levels of lead-paint contamination in the city’s schools. (Gothamist)

When was your last true “what the hell” subway moment? How about this one caught on video with an argument between a man holding a gun and another holding a bat? (@SubwayCreatures)

The summer’s long-range weather predictions have been made for the city, and it’s gonna be a hot year. (Patch)

In defense of summer in the city. (Gothamist)

There is a small ring of people stealing the earnings from Lyft and Uber drivers across the city using the drivers’ own phones to take the money. (Gothamist)

The ten oldest theaters in Times Square. (Untapped Cities)

After about 200 shows, Broadway’s ‘Be More Chill’ is set to close on August 11. (amNY)

Stargazing isn’t impossible in the city you just have to know where to look. (Atlas Obscura)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health includes a Little Italy favorite, a USPS cafeteria (which is also this week’s winner for most violations), and multiple others. (Patch)

If you’ve got the bug and are looking to run for elected office in the city, here’s how it just got a little easier. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Cardi B was indicted from a fight in a strip club was last year. She rejected a plea deal that would have required no jail time and was paired with reduced charges in April. (amNY)

Your guide to summer in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s a look at 12 things the Democrat-dominated state’s legislature accomplished this year. (NY Times)

The list of accomplishments in the state legislature looks impressive, but here’s what didn’t make the agenda. (Gothamist)

One thing that was left off the legislative agenda was the mayor’s attempts to change the specialized high school entrance exams. Consider the effort dead, with multiple Democrats voting against it in committee and it never seeing a floor vote. (NY Times)

What happened to the automatic voter registration bill? A “typo” derailed the effort and it will have to be taken up in the next legislative session. (Gothamist)

Maybe electric bikes shouldn’t be allowed in bike lanes? Wait, what?This makes sense if you’re the mayor, the rest of us will be left to scratch our heads. (Patch)

A body was found floating off Pier 36 on the Lower East Side. The body wasn’t identified outside of being a male Asian in his 30s. (The Villager)

The 14th St Busway, scheduled to take hold on July 1, was hit with a lawsuit by residents of Chelsea and the West Village. The lawsuit says the city hasn’t properly studied how banning cars will impact the surrounding neighborhoods. (Curbed)

Here are the details about what’s changing about marijuana in New York after the state’s decriminalization bill. (amNY)

The MTA is reorganizing this summer, but since the governor didn’t put one of the mayor’s board recommendations to the state senate, the city will have one less representative during the discussions. It’s possible that it was a simple mistake, but it’s also possible that this is another part of the rich tapestry that is the feud between Cuomo and de Blasio. (Politico)

Video: You’ve ridden the subways, the buses, the ferries, but have you ridden the Roosevelt Island tram? Here’s the history behind the city’s unique travel option. (Viewing NYC)

If you savor a truly awful smell, the New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower appears just about ready to bloom. It hits peak bloom for 24-36 hours, so if you’re looking to savor the smell of what is described as rotting meat, keep an eye on the flower’s status. (Gothamist)

The Nautilus, a new interactive art installation near the Seaport, is like a giant space-age musical instrument using light poles you can touch to produce sounds. The installation will be there through September 10. (Time Out)

The Coney Island Brewery, aptly located in Coney Island, will be expanding in August. (Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s Mermaid Parade in pictures. (BrooklynVegan)

and more pics. (amNY)

You can uncover your eyes. The Flying Wallendas successfully made the tightrope walk 25 stories above midtown. (NY Times)

Everyone pity the real estate investors, who have taken time out of their busy schedules to whine to any media outlet that will listen about how they won’t be able to deregulate rent-controlled apartments or unreasonably raise rents. (Splinter)

The city’s best cold noodle dishes. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for June 11, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars of New York Are Getting Saucy” Edition

14th St will become a busway in July, the mayor’s nemesis is a 16-year-old teen, New Yorkers support ending the measles religious exemption, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Two Bridges towers are at the center of a legal battle, centered around the developers’ attempts to work around the city council and the land use review procedures. (Curbed)

Respect to whoever was able to cover an entire Q train with graffiti extremely quickly without being caught. (@JMartinezNYC)

Welcome to Soho, or as the Times puts it, “CBD stores and face-mask pushers are going to destroy us all.” (NY Times)

The Brooklyn Pizza War of 2019 has only just begun. L&B Spumoni Gardens is opening up a DUMBO outpost mere steps from Grimaldi’s and Juliana’s. May the best slice win. (Eater)

It appears that Robert De Niro is on the verge of building a movie studio in Astoria. (QNS)

A correction from yesterday (thanks Harry!), the apartment building planned for the former Hell’s Angels clubhouse will be 22 apartments, not 22 stories. (Curbed)

Tiffani Torres is 16, a twice-caller on “Ask the Mayor” on WNYC, an activist with Teens Take Charge, and a thorn in the mayor’s side. She’s correctly criticized the mayor for his DOA presidential run distracting him from city business and has been vocal about the systemic issues facing the city’s schools. Is it too late to elect her mayor? She sat down for an interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Does Times Square need a 24-hour, multi-story “immersive” Krispy Kreme with a theater and, no I’m not kidding, a goddamn “glaze waterfall?” Of course it does. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Pride Parade took over Park Slope last weekend with heavy splashes of color, celebration, politicians, and remembrance of the Stonewall Riots half a century ago. (Brooklyn Paper)

Layleen Polanco, a 27-year old transgender woman, was found dead at Rikers Island on Friday. Polanco was a member of the House of Xtravaganza (get yourself up to speed on Ball Culture) and was arrested in April for assault and possession of a controlled substance. (Patch)

The city council scheduled a hearing to look into accusations against Grubhub (who owns Seamless), as well as Uber Eats, Doordash and the like, from restaurants accusing the company of charging fees for customer calls that never resulted in orders. (Eater)

10 of the best running spots in New York City, even if I think saying the High Line is a great place to run is like saying the Brooklyn Bridge is a great place to bike. (6sqft)

A helicopter crashed into AXA Equitable Center in Midtown, killing the pilot. Have you noticed how many helicopters are constantly flying around Manhattan? Manhattan has three public heliports and this was the second crash in less than a month, but that doesn’t seem to slow down the $800 trips to the Hamptons or the new service to take people to JFK Airport. (NY Times)

“Oh, you’re a girl, I thought you were a guy,” is an auspicious way to start a job somewhere. A chef is suing Hudson Yards Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, claiming she was fired for being a woman. (Eater)

With the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, New York has a path to become the first state to decriminalize sex work, even in the face of criticism from the governor, the mayor, and Corey Johnson. (Patch)

The NYPD are arresting turnstile jumpers. The officers have wide latitude to decide who they arrest and who they ticket, so it should become obvious very quickly that people of color will be arrested at a higher rate. In 2019 people of color represent 87% of people arrested for farebeating. exact numbers aren’t known because the NYPD is refusing to comply with a court order demanding them to disclose these numbers. (Gothamist)

The conversation about rent control has gotten so muddy and opaque it’s hard to know if this article which says that mom-and-pop landlords may decide to sell their buildings if rent reform passes, is steeped in the truth or has roots in one of the many astroturfing campaigns from larger landlords and developers. (amNY)

New Yorkers overwhelmingly support the end of religious exemptions for the measles vaccine. Overwhelming is 85%, which includes more than 80% support from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant populations polled. There’s a bill in the state’ legislature as you read this, but there is only a week left in the legislative session until summer recess. (Patch)

St. James Place in Bed Stuy is now Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace Way. (amNY)

Congrats to Gothamist on their site redesign. (Gothamist)

The perfect time for a sci-fi radio show is after midnight when everything is quiet and your imagination is ripe for exploration of its dark recesses. The “Hour of the Wolf” has aired between 1am – 3am on Thursday mornings since 1972. Helmed by Jim Freund, the show has had nearly every writer of importance on the show, the first U.S. broadcast of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and whose website was originally a collaboration with Tim Berners-Lee, the literal father of the world wide web. A living piece of broadcasting history on Atlantic Avenue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 14th St busway will arrive on July 1, drastically changing traffic and (hopefully_ speeding up the buses. (amNY)

32 great places to eat something kind of healthy for dinner. (The Infatuation)

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