The Briefly for July 31, 2020 – The “NYC Loves Until It Destroys” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: School outbreak plans, restaurant openings and closings, looking at a billionaire’s tax, where to eat outdoor brunch, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 78˚
Rain in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 75˚ High: 85˚

Is it legal to sublet your apartment? Yes, but it’s complicated. (Localize.City)

Photos: If you’re looking for a unique experience when it comes to outdoor dining, check out the USS Baylander at the West Harlem Piers near 125th St, which has a dockside bar and restaurant. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Real Estate Porn: A $3.4 million Clinton Hill house with a haunted past. (Dana Shulz for 6sqft)

Just in time for school conversations to spin up again, here’s this headline from the Times: Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

Every student in the city is going to be issued a $420 food stamp card, regardless of their income. This creates a weird dilemma for high-income families. The money on the cards is real and if it isn’t used it’s wasted, and giving the card to someone else to use is fraud. Fortunately, there is a solution. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

The city released plans for handling Covid-19 outbreaks in schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Is it possible for New Yorkers to “discover” a secluded and wonderful spot without destroying it? That’s the question across the entire city. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Without a federal stimulus, do NYC schools have enough money to open safely? (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Suraj Patel isn’t ready to concede the 12th Congressional district primary to incumbent Carolyn Mahoney, despite Mahony’s 3,700 vote lead, citing 12,000 ballots invalidated by the Board of Elections. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

He survived physical abuse, homelessness, and gang violence before coming to America as a refugee, where a homeless shelter trashed his wheelchairs while Saheed Adebayo Aare was put in a Manhattan isolation hotel. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Looking for somewhere new and weird to explore? Check out Dead Horse Inlet and Dead Horse Bay. (Kevin Wash for Forgotten New York)

The New York Liberty has a new CEO, just like the Brooklyn Nets do. Joe Tsai owns both teams and has been taking steps to put them both on equal footing with the installation of Keia Clark as CEO of the Liberty with the eventual goal of bringing the Liberty to the Barclays Center once possible. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Amanda Cohen, the chef and owner of Dirt Candy on if the no-tipping movement can survive the pandemic. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

The Department of Environmental Protection is looking to delay the Gowanus Canal cleanup from somewhere between 12 to 18 months due to declining revenues during the pandemic. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Remember when Governor Cuomo promised states that when New York was over the Covid-19 hump, he’d start sending help? Florida is the first recipient of his pledge, with the state sending gowns, gloves, masks, face shields, and hand santizer. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s legislature is introducing bills to try to prevent a doomsday scenario in the city where a rise in apartment vacancies could put an end to rent regulation. Under the current laws, when more than 5% of NYC apartments are vacant, rent regulation would come to an end. Building apartments and intentionally keeping them empty or working as hard as possible to evict tenants to drive up the vacancy rate sounds like a conspiracy but I’ll never put anything past landlords. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Governor Cuomo is against raising taxes on billionaires but seems to be totally cool with raising MTA fares and tolls on bridges, essentially taxing every non-billionaire instead. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The arguments for and against the constitutionality of a billionaires’ tax. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

June and July bring the summer’s heat, but it also brings nesting turtles onto the runways of JFK airport. Inside the annual struggle to protect the turtles in Jamaica Bay. (Lori Chung for NY1)

Even if Columbia University attempts to return to in-person classes in the call a strike by maintenance workers could halt their plans completely unless a new contract is agreed to by Friday night. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

With no help from the Yankees, the 161st St BID is trying to create a welcoming atmosphere around the stadium to help many of the area’s struggling businesses. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

McCarren Tennis Center’s weatherproof bubble over the public tennis courts will stay up all summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

Only around 14 percent of state prison inmates have been tested for Covid-19 since the crisis began. I’m no epidemiologist, but that seems like a low percentage. In comparison, there has been 2.596 million tests conducted in the city, which would cover about 30% of the population. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Tropical Storm Isaias may make landfall in NYC on Monday because things aren’t hard enough already. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What to expect at today’s “Take Your Knee Off Our Necks” in Midtown. (NY1)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is making the New York City court system into a scapegoat for the recent surge in gun violence according to Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks. (NY1)

Queens got a Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Family Court on Jamaica Avenue. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Get ready, because it’s ConEd blackout season. Southern Brooklyn was the first to be asked to turn down their electrical usage. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Where to get takeout in Greenwich Village and the West Village. Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The MTA is installing free mask dispensers inside city buses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Augustine in the Financial DIstrict. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Rosario’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

A list of the Williamsburg & Greenpoint places closed for good during COVID-19. (Bill Pearis for Greenpointers)

Farewell to Le Sia in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

Farewell to An Choi on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Union Pool’s patio and taco truck are back! (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Mott Street from Worth to Moscoe is closed off to cars and 10 restaurants all have outdoor dining with seating for over 100. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Where to eat outside on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The best outdoor brunch spots in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 19, 2020 – The “Phase Four Starts Monday” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A look at phase four, Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars, how to see the comet Neowise before it disappears, Metro-North has an awful new superhero & more

Hey! The Briefly is still a one-man hobby, and I overslept on Friday!

Phase four will start on Monday, but it’s been modified. Initially, phase four was supposed to include indoor venues, building on phase three’s indoor dining. No indoor activities are included in phase four. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The official list of what qualifies for phase four: Higher Education, Pre-K to Grade 12 Schools, Low-Risk Outdoor Arts & Entertainment, Low-Risk Indoor Arts & Entertainment, Media Production, Professional Sports Competitions With No Fans, and Malls. The indoor arts and entertainment is pertaining to museums and galleries and not seeing your favorite band play for a dozen people. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

New York City has public-drinking laws, of course, which include the regulation of open containers. Some New Yorkers have treated the city’s temporary takeout-cocktail laws as a cause for celebration, an opening of the streets. New Orleans meets Manhattan. But not me. While bars and restaurants reopen, the lines between which people get to enjoy these laws and which people do not are clearer than ever before. There are no alfresco dinner parties in the projects.
– Christian Rodriguez, Who Really Gets to Drink Outside in New York? for Eater

The rollout for Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars and restaurants was a bit shaky. There’s a new three-strike system, where noncompliance with to-go alcohol mandates or social distancing will earn an establishment up to three strikes before having its liquor license suspended, but also egregious violations could mean an immediate suspension. The new rules will mean that you’ll likely see a few small bullshit food items handed out alongside a to-go drink. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coverage of closing restaurants:

An ode to Odessa. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What to order from Angkor before it closes on August 1. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Hunky Dory is reopening, but without tipping. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Lilia is reopening for outdoor dining in Williamsburg and there’s already a multi-week wait. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Dirt Candy is back with takeout and outdoor dining. (Scott Lynch and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Smorgasburg is coming back too, with takeout only. Does takeout exist from an outdoor tent? (Erika Adams for Eater)

Grand Central Terminal’s food hall is open again. With no possible way to participate in outdoor dining at Grand Central, is it the only place in the city with indoor dining? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants that are open for outdoor dining. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The Bronx’s Little Italy on Arthur Avenue, aka “Piazza di Belmont” is taking over the street for most of the weekend over the summer. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The 9 best streets for outdoor dining in NYC this summer. Glad to see Arthur Ave is at the top of this list. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

How to see the comet Neowise in the city. You’ve got about a week to try to see it before it leaves for 6,000 years. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The mayor is calling for all 1,349 curfew protesters to face charges. Curfew violations are a Class B misdemeanor and punishable with up to a $500 fine and three months in jail. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One bad take deserves another. Here’s a bad take from Governor Cuomo, who opposes a billionaire’s tax because he says the ultra-rich will just leave New York. New York has 118 billionaires who increased their wealth by $77 billion over the four months of staying at home. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A review of Brooklyn Noosh on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn and it’s “secret garden” for outdoor dining with a recommendation for the Flamin’ Hot Cheeto Wings. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

How to order takeout from Rao’s Italian food in East Harlem since landing one of the restaurant’s ten coveted tables is out of most of our grasp. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A fascinating question. Without food service jobs to subsidize their lives and art, what will happen to New York’s creative class? (Deepti Hajela for AP)

Metro-North now has its own extremely lame superhero. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The New York Botanical Garden is opening up on July 28. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in the West Village. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 2, 2020 – The “Eating Outdoors in the New Eating Indoors” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The July 4th flyover, digging deeper into the budget, the building collapse in Carroll Gardens, mass transit returns to normal for July 4, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

The MTA announced normal weekend service for July 4 to meet the expected demand for the city’s beaches on a combination of the first weekend with lifeguards and a holiday. (Robert Pozarycki for Bronx Times)

The Department of Defense announced a flyover of NYC on July 4 as part of the “2020 Salute to America.” Yes, definitely a year worth saluting. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Video: Tuesday’s unannounced fireworks show was near the Statue of Liberty at 11 pm. At 11 pm, is there anything distinction between the Macy’s and illegal fireworks? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Indoor dining is off the proverbial table for phase three, as expected. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

According to the NYC Hospitality Alliance, only one-fifth of bars and restaurants were able to pay their June bills on time. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork)

“Surely, some people will still insist on dining out anyway. Perhaps they’ve assessed that the chances of falling ill are acceptable, or that they’re ready to tough it out if they get sick. So allow me to recount what it’s actually like to catch COVID-19 — and I was one of the lucky ones.”
-Ryan Sutton for Eater, Why This Restaurant Critic Isn’t Dining Out Right Now

The argument for tipping 50% when dining outdoors. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The NYC budget moves school safety officers from the NYPD’s budget to the Department of Educations budget, but it also imposes a hiring freeze on new teachers and reduces the number of school counselors. In the words of City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, this is “not a people victory.” (Annie Todd for Gothamist)

“Does it mean I’m less safe? Where do you take the billion dollars from? Does it mean I’m more safe? Does it have any effect on police abuse? I don’t know what it means.” Governor Cuomo encapsulates the entire conversation coming out of the NYC budget‘s shifting around of the NYPD budget, pointing out that the city has to “redesign the whole relationship” between the NYPD and its citizens. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Also included in the city’s budget is an 11% cut to cultural affairs, which includes after-school programs, funding for the Cultural Immigrant Initiative, the Coalition of Theaters of Color, the Bronx Children’s Museum, BAM’s arts instruction in schools, the city’s four zoos and aquarium, and more. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

The city’s budget cut the Fair Fares program by $65 million, which helps subsidize low-income New Yorkers’ mass transit, in a financial hit to low-income New Yorkers and the MTA. MTA Chairpowerson Pat Foye says congestion pricing is a virtual impossibility” thanks to the federal government and the pandemic. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s taken over three years, but the first street in the city’s Great Streets pilot program is complete. Atlantic Ave in East New York and Cypress Hills was rebuilt with updates to traffic safety, new curbs, water mains, trees, and fire hydrants, and more quality of life upgrades. (East New York News)

“I don’t know what the landlord can do and where the rent strike can take us. It’s frustrating. You’re sitting down with all these things, but you don’t know what to do; you don’t know where to turn and everywhere you turn it’s “Oh, your income is not enough.”” – Five stories from New Yorkers of what it’s like not paying rent. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

How do white people in a mostly white neighborhood stand up for BIPOC? Lessons learned on being an effective ally from a protest in Greenpoint. (Melissa Kravitz Joeffner for Greenpointers)

How much does it cost in the first year of dog companionship in NYC? According to a new study, the price of a new best friend is $3,823.05 for the first year and $2,351 for each subsequent year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

2020’s most popular dog breed in the city is the Havanese according to the website Rover. I’m not sure this includes mutts, like my Scooter and Pepper. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

227 Duffield Street will be considered for landmark status. The address has been at the center of a preservationist fight for over a decade, as the house was associated with the abolitionist movement and a stop on the Underground Railroad. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Video: A look back in time at Harry Nugent, the city’s most beloved subway conductor. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

John Mullaly might be seen as the father of New York City parks, but he’s also credited for instigating the notorious Draft Riots of 1863 and for his racist views on Black people. That’s why activists are calling for removal of his name from Mullaly Park, a neighbor to Yankee Stadium and in a majority-minority neighborhood. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

After spending years as Mayor de Blasio’s mouthpieces, Press Secretary Freddi Goldstein and Communications Director Wiley Norvell are quitting. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

How did you celebrate Bobby Bonilla Day on July 1? If you are Bobby Bonilla, you were paid $1,193,248.20 by the Mets to not play for the Mets, just like you have been for nearly 20 years and like you will be through 2035. (Alex Mitchell for QNS)

A former Pret A Manger employee filed a lawsuit, alleging that its employees “created and fostered a discriminatory and hostile work environment” against her while she worked in several of the company’s NYC stores. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Info on Wednesday’s building collapse in Carroll Gardens. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New voter registrations were down 50% in NYC in 2020 compared to 2019, creating worries about the November elections and amplifying calls for online voter registration. (Christine Chung for The City)

Some Queens NYCHA residents have been living with no gas for cooking since before the pandemic started. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

Harlem’s Marcus Garvey, Jackie Robinson, and Wagner Houses pools will open on August 1. Across the city, 15 pools will open by August 1. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

11 outdoor bars, parklets, rooftops, and restaurants to chill out at this summer. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Thanks to reader Victor for today’s featured photo from Domino Park