The Briefly for August 9, 2019 – The “Our Punching Bag Mayor” Edition

The weekend subway delays, the mayor’s potential ethics violations, the city’s new restaurants, David Chang reacts to Stephen Ross’ Trump fundraiser and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit seven different subway lines. If you’re planning on getting wherever you’re going via the subway, double-check. (Subway Weekender)

Looking for a beach read for the weekend? This piece in the Times about how Bill de Blasio went from a progressive hopeful to Democratic a laughing stock and punching bag is a good read. (NY Times Magazine)

It’s so common for businesses that close “for renovations” to never reopen that places like Boilermaker in the East Village are changing their signs to explicitly state they’ll be reopening. (EV Grieve)

During the trials for the members of the SPLC designated hate group The Proud Boys for their part in starting fights following a talk from founder Gavin McInnes in Manhattan, the members of the Proud Boys claim that it was the Antifa members that posed a threat and they were simply defending themselves. (NY Times)

8 places to staycation and vacation this summer. (amNY)

When the city put a freeze on the number of cars it allowed for ride-hailing apps, drivers claimed it was unfair because of the price of leasing one of the licensed cars. Now the Taxi & Limousine Commission is investigating those leases. (Patch)

Is this the best egg salad sandwich in New York City? Gothamist believes they’ve found it at Bibble and Sip. (Gothamist)

Michael Collopy was hit and killed by a cyclist on the corner of 23rd and 6th earlier this week, the second pedestrian to be killed by a cyclist in 2019. 23rd and 6th is particularly dangerous, a cyclist was killed at the intersection in June and there have been multiple crashes in the last five years there. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross, president of the company that owns Equinox, Blink Fitness, SoulCycle, and PURE Yoga and an investor in multiple popular restaurants is hosting a $100k/plate fundraiser for the president’s re-election campaign, “strongly disagrees” with the president, but it’s not stopping him from hosting the fundraiser anyway. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross was “the only potential investor” in David Chang’s Momofuku. Chang asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser on his podcast but didn’t mention if he actually asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser personally or if he decided that mentioning it on his podcast would absolve him of the situation. (Eater)

Chang isn’t the only chef doing damage control after his connection to Stephen Ross became public. Christina Tosi of Milk took investment from Ross and José Andrés opened multiple restaurants in the Hudson Yards, where Ross is his landlord. Both have issued statements to publicly distance themselves from Ross, but have not made a statement about what they intend to do moving forward. (Grub Street)

BAM commissioned Leo Villareal, Teresita Fernández and Hank Willis Thomas to create public art for its Fort Greene campus, to be completed in the next two years. (6sqft)

Photos from inside the Paley Center’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be alarmed, but a venomous snake may have gotten loose from the Bronx Zoo and no one knows where it is. Not as much fun as the loose cobra from a few years ago, some signs have been posted to keep your eyes open for a “nervous” black and yellow mangrove snake. (Gothamist)

Okay, let’s talk about the summer of White Claw. (Grub Street)

If you’re the kind of person who loves awful experiences, you can watch this 41-minute 43-second interview between Sean Hannity and Bill de Blasio. (Gothamist)

Each generation of commerce ruins the previous generation’s pillars and tenets and the slow and public death of the Sex and the City-type shopping experiences are no different. Even in this piece in the Times which bemoans when shopping “felt like art,” Ginia Bellafante admits that the stores she looks back on fondly are the same stores that signaled “the beginning of SoHo’s end.” (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio has taken his local ethics-violating campaign financing to his failing presidential bid, or as Susan Lerner of Common Cause New York describes him, “a walking ethical disaster.” (Gothamist)

The MTA’s fare hikes won’t help address financial woes, due to the fare hikes outpacing increases in income for poorer New Yorkers. If fares continue to go up, but not wages, mass transit becomes less of an option for the people who need it most. (Patch)

Even hawks need some privacy while destroying a pigeon on the sidewalk. (Gothamist)

Traffic at LaGuardia was so bad last night that the nearby highways and internal roads were full of people abandoning their rides in buses, cabs, and cars to walk in an attempt to catch their flights. (Gothamist)

New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza is popular with parents amid calls for his firing, a new survey shows. Carranza has been accused of sowing racial division due to his push for racial integration of the city’s school. (Patch)

19 new restaurants in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for January 30, 2019 – The “Two People in 220 Square Feet for 24 Years” Edition

Cuffing season for the Mandarin Duck, gun control passes in the legislature, 24 years in a 220 square-foot apartment, what you should tip, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’re gonna be someone who orders delivery in this weeks bitter cold, tip at least 30% if you’re one of those monsters that orders Seamless in the middle of a storm. (Mother Jones)

Meet the couple that have lived in a rent-stabilized 220 square foot apartment with no kitchen and a shared bathroom for 24 years in the Chelsea Hotel. (6sqft)

The de Blasio staffer with a history of sexual harassment accusations passed through the Department of Investigation’s “thorough” background check. (Politico)

Malaysia Goodson, a 22-year-old mother, died while falling down the stairs of the 7th Avenue B/D/E station with her 1-year-old daughter in a stroller. Her daughter survived and is with family. The station does not have an elevator, highlighting the city’s mass transit accessibility problem. (amNY)

The NYPD believes her death was caused by a medical episode and not the fall. (NY Post)

The new Hank’s Saloon is open and waiting for patrons to turn the place into the dive it once was. (Brooklyn Paper)

The flurry of bills passed by the state’s legislature continues, with the latest round of bills aimed at gun control. The bills prevent teachers from carrying guns on school grounds, allow petitioning to remove guns from dangerous people, extends background checks, bans bump stocks, requires state gun buybacks, and mandates out-of-state applicants give authorities their mental health records. (amNY)

St. Mark’s Comics is closing at the end of February after 36 years. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

An illustrated guide to New York City’s architectural styles. (Curbed)

A Quentin Tarantino themed bar is opening this week. No, it’s not in Bushwick. Yes, it’s in Williamsburg. (Patch)

The Mandarin Duck story has taken a new turn: mating season. (Gothamist)

Good news for drivers: Waze now works in NYC tunnels. (amNY)

Reported is a smartphone app that allows you to report reckless driving from taxis. In 2018, users filed 3,800 complaints. (Streetsblog)

A hospital error resulted in a woman instructing the hospital to pull the plug of a man she was told was her brother. It wasn’t her brother. (Gothamist)

Add the Teamsters to the list of groups against Amazon’s HQ2. (Metro)

This photo of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge under construction in 1963 is wild. (Viewing NYC)

The couch in a tree on the Upper West Side has been taken down. How it got up there is still a mystery. (NY Post)

What does parking placard abuse look like? This. (@rebranddrivong)

Where to eat near 11 comedy clubs. (The Infatuation)

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