The Briefly for December 4, 2018 – The “Legalize Weed to Save the Subways” Edition

City Hall is in chaos over Mayor de Blasio’s botched firing, parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plans racist, the 7 train’s new signals aren’t helping, and other uplifting stories in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Bill de Blasio, absentee mayor. (NY Times)

Are you ready for NYPD tactical drones? (NY Post)

The 10 worst dishes of the year, including one sandwich from Arby’s, from Eater’s senior critic Robert Sietsema.

Could legal weed save our subways? (NY Times)

12 new public art installations to pair with a hot drink of your choosing. (Untapped Cities)

Santacon is this Saturday, starting at 10am. In a defensive move, the LIRR, Metro North, and NJ Transit have all banned alcohol consumption. If you need to be on a train that day, may the odds be ever in your favor. (Gothamist)

With Santacon descending onto the unwilling city this Saturday, here are a list of the bars to avoid. (Time Out)

Board of Elections Executive Director Michael Ryan enjoyed nine undisclosed trips paid for by Election Systems and Software, makers of the ballot scanning machines that plagued the city on Election Day. He never received the necessary waiver from the city’s Conflicts of Interest Board to sit on the conpany’s board of advisors. (Gothamist)

George R.R. Martin: pizza critic? (Gothamist)

The 10 biggest real estate projects coming to NYC. (The Real Deal)

The Staten Island NYPD officers Kyle Erickson and Elmer Pastran, accused of planting pot in a black teenager’s car, have, surprise surprise, a history of accusations of racial profiling. (Gothamist)

The Apollo Theater is expanding for the first time since 1934. The foundation that oversees the Apollo will take over the Victoria and open 99 and 199 seat performance spaces and should open in 2020. (NY Times)

“The richest man in America, who’s a direct competitor, has just been handed $3 billion in subsidies. I’m not asking for money or a tax rebate. Just leave me alone.” -Strand owner Nancy Bass Wyden (6sqft)

Thanks to a new legislation, Uber and Lyft drivers will be paid at least minimum wage. (NY Post)

Upset about the Amazon Long Island City deal? You could install the “Black Amazon for Me” Chrome extension, but we all know you won’t. (amNY)

The 7 trains brand new signals, installed late and over budget, weren’t installed optimally. At this point, is anyone surprised that the MTA spent too much money and took too much time to poorly install signals that haven’t helped? (amNY)

Squibb Bridge was installed in 2013 to connect the Brooklyn Promenade to Brooklyn Nridge Park, but the last five years have been full of closures, structural problems, and a lawsuit. The bridge is going to be replaced by 2020. (Curbed)

As we’re hitting the home stretch of 2018, we could be looking at a new record low number of homicides. Despite the downward trend, rape complaints continue to increase, following a two year trend. (amNY)

Parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plan racist, which shows just how complicated this situation is. (NY Post)

What the hell is going on in City Hall and why can’t the mayor get his administration under control? (NY Post)

Everything to know about the restaurants in the Hudson Yards. (Thrillist)

The first map of Central Park for people with disabilities or otherwise “limited mobility” is now available. (West Side Rag)

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The Briefly for November 16, 2018 – The “A Few Inches of Snow Should Not Be the Apocalypse” Edition

That was only the first snow of the season, the 10 best restaurants in the city, Danny DeVito Day, Simcha Felder switches sides (again), LIC’s history of booms, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It’s the weekend, so take precautions before riding the subway. Like a magician, the MTA will make the L and Q mostly disappear, and multiple other lines are running partial service. All the weekend subway changes. (6sqft)


Winter Storm Avery

What hell happened during Thursday’s storm that the city’s government was so unprepared to deal with the snow?

Turns out the snow storm was worse than predicted. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority shut down before 6pm because of overcrowding. (NY Post)

Staten Island turned into a borough-wide parking lot. (SI Live)

The Bronx was at a standstill. (Welcome2TheBronx)


You’d be surprised at how the MTA finds faulty subway signals. (Gothamist)

The 6 best pumpkin soups in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With Silvercup, Chiclets, Dentyne, PS1, Sunshine Biscuits, and finally to Amazon, Long Island City’s history is one of booms. The neighborhood’s occupancy rate of 98.2% isn’t slowing interest, with real estate searches for LIC spiking nearly 300% in the past few days. (amNY, 6sqft)

The state senate’s biggest marijuana booster is in Nevada, touring the world’s largest marijuana dispensary. Hmmm… (Bklyner)

How can dating in the city get worse? Add 25,000 tech bros to the mix. (NY Post)

Fares are going up in March, ridership is declining, and drastic cuts are coming to service. The MTA’s future is unsustainable. (NY Times)

New York has a taxi driver suicide problem. Roy Kim was the eighth driver in the last year who committed suicide. (Gothamist)

In an attempt to keep up with Uber and Lyft, yellow taxis are offering a 50% discount during rush hours if you use the app Waave. (6sqft)

A new exhibit at the 9/11 museum spotlights the Mohawk ironworkers who helped build One World Trade. The Mohawk ironworkers helped build New York’s iconic skyline, having a hand in the construction of the Statue of Liberty, the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and the George Washington Bridge. (amNY)

Tea & Sympathy, open since 1980 and a subject of discussion during the gubernatorial Democratic primary, is in danger of closing. The cost of staying in the West Village, $28,000 a month, has caught up with the tea house. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The potentially dangerous flaw in the new Delancey Street bike lane. (Gothamist)

Subway chief Andy Byford is bragging about how he shamed a turnstile jumper into buying a MetroCard. If he can convince 13,333,333,333 more people to buy Metrocards, he’ll pay for his fantasy $40 billion subway plan. (NY Post)

The 10 best restaurants in the city, according to Pete Wells. (NY Times)

Amazon Cuomo thinks that state lawmakers deserve a raise. (NY Post)

Remember the homeless man and the couple who raised money for him and that turned into a mess? Well it turns out the whole thing was a lie! All three are being charged with second-degree conspiracy and theft by deception. (NY Times)

Democrat Simcha Felder, the city’s political equivalent of a Mets fan that runs out to buy a Yankees hat and jersey the day after they make it to the World Series, does not have plans to attend the Republican conference, which he’s been attending since 2012. (Politico)

Danny DeVito Day is a holiday worth celebrating. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for October 9, 2018 – Columbus Day Parade was a Bust, the Best Trick-or-Treating, the Tattoo Ban, and More

The history of NYC’s tatoo ban, the mayor blames the gym for him being a dick, Tony Avella is a sore loser, the GOP is abandoning Molinaro, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

You have until October 12 to register for the November 6 election. Check your voter registration status before the deadline to make sure you’re registered.

The best neighborhoods in the city for Halloween trick-or-treating. (Curbed)

The history of NYC’s 36-year ban on tattoos. (Untapped Cities)

Amid the embarrassing mess that is New York City public school bus program, former Deputy Schools Chancellor Elizabeth Rose resigned Friday from her post as “senior transportation contracts adviser.” She had been demoted twice this year and reports conflict if she quit or was fired. (Daily News)

Anthony Weiner is on track to be released early from federal prison for good conduct in May 2019, rather than August. (NY Post)

Where to find the most famous residents of New York City, in their permanent places of rest. (Curbed)

Greenacre Park, which features a 25-foot waterfall on E 51st between 2nd and 3rd, in Midtown was added to the National Registry of Historic Places. (6sqft)

The mayor decided that it’s the gym’s fault and not his own that he dismissed a homeless advocate and not his own. “There is an explicit rule: You are not allowed to film in the place.” (NY Post)

City Taxi & Limousine Commissioner Meera Joshi was chased away from a vigil held in honor of late Uber driver Fausto Luna on Sunday. (amNY)

NYPD officer Simone Teagle is suing the city and the mayor for $5 million for allegedly being discriminated against for being a nursing mother. (NY Post)

Joel Herskovitz, a Hasidic man, was arrested for disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, and obstructing governmental administration in Borough Park after intentionally blocking a cop car in the middle fo the street and now members of the community are calling for the commanding officer to be removed, which is highly unlikely. Video of the incident shows the group chanting “Nazi” at the arresting officers. (Gothamist)

After losing the Democratic primary to John Liu, sore loser and current Queens State Senator Tony Avella will run on a third-party ticket. (NY Post)

GOP gubernatorial hopeful Marcus J. Molinaro is down to his last $210k while the state’s Republican Party has abandoned him and is focusing their efforts, and funding, on the State Senate. (NY Times)

“If I had to list it, it’d be the worst parade I’ve ever attended.” The Columbus Day Parade wasn’t a hit this year. (NY Post)


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