The Briefly for November 14, 2019 – The “Problem Goes Deeper Than Policing Churros” Edition

Virginity tests, the NYPD’s illegal child fingerprint database was destroyed, the food at Wegmans gets reviewed, OMNY expands, pie shops, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The punishment for killing a woman with a car? $750 and a suspended license. (Streetsblog)

“I am calling on the governor to immediately remove these additional officers from the MTA and put that money into actually improving the system. The governor cannot expect the public to pay the fare when the State is refusing to hold up its own financial responsibility.” – City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn (Streetsblog)

Will the 500 new police officers on buses and in subway stations prevent 33 million evaded fares a year for ten years? That figure, of course, doesn’t include any lawsuits that spawn from arrests made by those officers. That’s the monetary argument, but if the surge of officers is about fare evasion and protecting MTA workers, why are the headlines about churro ladies and teenagers selling candy? It’s about the kind of city we want to be. (Second Ave Sagas)

A look at the new Tompkins Square Playground’s equipment for kids with special needs. (EV Grieve)

The City Council voted to give themselves a $36,000 raise, but haven’t been nearly as generous with their staff, who make $47,784 annually on average. There has been conversations about unionization to improve salaries. (Politico)

A vegetarian restaurant that only serves one item, but is it any good? Yes is the answer. (Gothamist)

The city owns most of the land in the amusement area of Coney Island, but Central Amusement International (owners of Luna Park) operates the lease on the boardwalk shops. In addition to rent, they take 10% of their overall sales. In recent years they’ve been favoring their own games, shops, and food options over mom and pop shops. This is a private business deciding on the future of businesses who are on land owned by the city. Lola Star, the woman behind the boardwalk shop and roller discos across Brooklyn is stepping up and resurrecting the advocacy group Save Coney Island. (Coney Island Blog)

Every rental building in Manhattan ranked by price. (StreetEasy)

The Charging Bull isn’t moving… yet. Despite the mayor talking big in public about how it has to be moved due to Bowling Green being an unsafe place for that high number of visitors it receives, a location to move it to was never decided on. For now, the bull remains. (Gothamist)

The Coalition for Affordable Homes is introducing a proposal for a Small Home Anti-Speculation Tax that would impose a 15-20% tax on property transferred to a new owner within two years of ownership. While they may not prevent flipping houses, it would reinvest in affordable housing in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

After 24,200 calls to 911 since June using a burner cellphone, Yogit Persaud was arrested. Each time she would call, the police or FDNY or both would have to respond to the claim, regardless if they knew it was from her and it was a false report. Persaud purports the NYPD has conspired against her. She was arrested for making a false emergency report, obstructing governmental administration, and aggravated harassment. (Gothamist)

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, leader of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and current investigator of sexual abuse the Buffalo diocese, sexually assaulted an 11-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New Jersey in the 70s, according to a new lawsuit. (NY Times)

Billionaire Barry Diller’s public park island off Pier 55 has a new name and it’s “Little Island.” A modest name considering the price tag ballooned from $35 million to $250 million. (Gothamist)

Junior’s Law, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is a bill that will reimburse small businesses owners the cost of a panic button, which could have saved the teenager’s life. The bill has 31 supporters in the City Council. (amNewYork)

Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce wants you to remember that there are still stores that are open left on Bleecker Street to shop at and has declared November 23 “Shop Bleecker Day,” where participating shops will provide deals and discounts. (amNewYork)

Virginity tests are still a thing in the year 2019. A bill was introduced to ban them in New York. This is, of course, coming into headlines now because T.I. admitted in an interview that he forces his 18-year-old daughter to undergo hymen checks annually, which is awful. (Gothamist)

While Staten Island is still a part of New York City (you can read about that in yesterday’s edition of The Briefly), it has a new dockless bike program. Beryl will operate 1,000 bikes across the island starting in the spring. (Streetsblog)

Take a look inside (renderings of) Disney’s upcoming Hudson Square HQ. (amNewYork)

The governor gave National Grid two weeks to hook up new customers of he will revoke their franchise to supply gas to New York City. (Gothamist)

The NYPD’s illegal database of children’s fingerprints was confirmed to be destroyed after a years-long investigation into it by the Legal Aid Society. (Patch)

“Wegmans is not good enough to be your destination food court.” Eater reviews the food at Wegmans. (Eater)

OMNY is hitting more subway stations next month, including Penn Station. (6sqft)

A guide to OMNY. (Curbed)

The city fines landlords for lead, but rarely ever collects. Even the highest estimates put the figure at 10%. (Gothamist)

The new age for tobacco or e-cigarette purchases is now 21 years old. (amNewYork)

Seven ways to fix your overheated apartment. Yes, “open the windows” is number one. (StreetEasy)

14 spectacular pie shops. (Eater)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for October 7, 2019 – The “A $41 Million Oversight in Long Island City” Edition

Late-night subway closures, safe injection sites get another boost, the woman in the Bronx Zoo lion’s enclosure wasn’t as brave/stupid as you think, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

You’re in the clear for late-night trains this week, unless you’re taking the 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, A, F, N, Q, or R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Construction meant to eventually speed up the subways is causing all sorts of problems for anyone who needs to get around at night, especially for people coming and going from work. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Columbia University is honoring Maya Angelou, Gloria E. Anzaldúa, Diana Chang, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, A. Revathi, Ntozake Shange, and Leslie Marmon Silko by hanging their names on a banner above the names of male philosophers that are engraved on the building. (Untapped Cities)

Take a look at what Brooklyn’s tallest office building will look like on the inside. (Curbed)

With $41 million spent on the Hunter’s Point library, you wouldn’t imagine they’d already be rearranging the books, but here we are. Three fiction sections will be relocated after it was pointed out that they were only accessible via the stairs and anyone unable to use stairs would be shut out of those sections. The staff says they’ll retrieve books for people who want to check them out, but maybe instead an accessible library should have been designed instead. (Gothamist)

We’re getting close to peak foliage in the city, so until we’re past it I’ll keep listing these foliage guides. The carless New Yorker’s guide to fall foliage. (Patch)

The luxury apartment development that will sit on the old 5 Pointz spot in Queens got full-throated support for a 1,100 apartment expansion from Community Board 5 after setting aside 5,000 square feet for a library, creating additional below-market-rate housing, and increasing the size of the artist studio and gallery. (Curbed)

8 notable NYC projects designed by Latino architects. (Curbed)

Dante in Greenwich Village has been named the #1 bar in the world. (Time Out)

Did your favorites make the list? Here are the restaurants ordered closed this week. (Patch)

Is Governor Cuomo scared to open safe injection sites in the city? A federal judge ruled this week that safe injection sites don’t violate federal law, so what’s he waiting for? (Gothamist)

Para Roberto is the city’s newest monument which is in tribute to Roberto Clemente, which features bronze sugar cane stalks, a chair made of baseball bats and stickball bats adorned with the Puerto Rican flag. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Okay, who’s the asshole pointing lasers at planes? (Gothamist)

Five slices in five boroughs in one weekend day. It sounds impossible, but an uphill battle never stopped a New Yorker before. Welcome to the Five Borough Pizza Challenge. (QNS)

There was a rumor that an Outback Steakhouse was moving into the old Union Square Coffee Shop location. Thankfully, that rumor isn’t true, but a Chase bank is going in alongside a Just by Chole. (Gothamist)

The borough with the most heat and hot water complaints in the city is the Bronx, with 33.1% of the city’s complaints. (Curbed)

What building has the most complaints? It’s on Elmhurst Ave in Queens<>/a>. (Jackson Heights Post)

In praise of the vegan-egg sandwich that’s almost as satisfying as its bodega cousin. (Grub Street)

After the second friendly-fire killing this year, advocates are calling for more firearms training for the NYPD. (Gothamist)

Photo galleries of coslay from New York Comic Con: Gothamist | Gizmodo | Time Out | Brooklyn Vegan

An important note about Myah Autry, the woman wanted by the NYPD for jumping into the lion and giraffe enclosures at the Bronx Zoo: While she was inside the enclosure, she was on the other side of a moat from the lions and not nearly in the danger she’d like you to think she was in. Now her real danger comes from the NYPD. (NY Times)

A 24-year-old suspect was arrested for killing four men assumed to be homeless in Chinatown and a fifth was taken to a hospital. (NY Times)

A history of Red Hook’s Barnacle Parade, the annual taunting that Hurricane Sandy may have damaged the neighborhood but it did not break its spirits. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

It took less than a day for the brand new playground at Tompkins Square Park to be vandalized. (EV Grieve)

The 24th bike rider killed by a motorist in the city in 2019 is 10-year-old Dalerjon Shahobiddinov of Brooklyn. (Streetsblog)

Brooklyn’s best dive bars. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for September 10, 2019 – The “A Horrifying Nightmare Trip on Columbus Ave” Edition

The tribute in lights is killing birds, $90k of stolen cake, a guide to apple picking, more details about the Charging Bull banjo attack, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

San Gennaro kicks off on Thursday, and amNY has a guide for what you need to know and what you need to eat. (amNY)

The May Room, an art installation from Shantell Martin, has taken over Our Lady Star of the Sea, the military chapel on Governors Island, through October 27. This is the first time the chapel is open to the public in twenty years. (Untapped Cities)

While the amusement area in Coney Island is larger than ever, its neighborhood storefronts are struggling with the third highest vacancy rate in Brooklyn and sixth in the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There’s a jimsonweed bush growing on the Columbus Ave greenway at the corner of 93rd St. It’s an odd pick to be planted there, as jimsonweed is highly toxic when consumed. That’s not all. The plant can be made into a powerful drug that is easy to overdose on and if you survive you’re almost guaranteed a horrifying nightmare of a hallucinogenic trip that turns its victims into “zombies devoid of free will.” Avoid the plant. (Gothamist)

Is there nothing New York won’t add alcohol to? Taco Bell, ice cream, and now bubble tea. Bubbleology opens on the 16th in the East Village (Time Out)

A guide to picking apples near the city. (Patch)

This is such a bummer I’m surprised it didn’t come from Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Tribute in Lights, which takes place for a few days every year around the anniversary of 9/11, is killing thousands and thousands of birds. It seems that birds get confused by the light during their migration periods, essentially trapping them and preventing them from having the energy to finish their trip south. Since 2006, the tribute has ruined over a million birds’ flight patterns. (Splinter)

Think about cake. Now think about a lot of cake. Now think about $90,000 of cake. That’s how much cake a deliveryman stole from Lady M in Long Island City. (LIC Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. He joins City Councilmembers Brad Lander and Antonio Reynoso with his endorsement. Do you think it’ll get awkward when de Blasio finally fails out of the race and comes back to do his job in the city? (Patch)

Restoration on the World’s Fair Observation Towers in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will begin next month. If you’ve ever been curious what’s at the top of the towers, there are some photos. (Untapped Cities)

We’re no Hawaii, but New York state is the 15th “happiest” state in the country. At least we’re not West Virginia, right? (Patch)

Good news for the asphalt area in Tompkins Square Park, which is known as the epicenter of NYC skateboard culture. The city had originally planned to turn over the area while East River Park gets rebuilt to prevent rising sea levels from destroying Manhattan, but the Parks Department has changed its plans after an outcry from the community and a rally promoted by City Councilmember Carlina Rivera. (Gothamist)

Is NYCHA ready for the next Superstorm Sandy? After the 2012 storm, nearly 80,000 residents were without electricity for weeks. Seven years later, Comptroller Scott Stringer is questioning the de Blasio administration’s preparedness. (Curbed)

More details are starting to emerge about this weekend’s banjo-wielding attack by Tevon Varlack from Dallas on the Charging Bull statue. Repairing the statue will cost around $100,000. (Gothamist)

FlyNYON is already under federal scrutiny for its fatal 2018 East River crash which left five people dead. Now it’s attracting even more negative attention for its recent promotion offering dogs a spot in its doors-off helicopter rides around lower Manhattan. (Patch)

Here are the street closures for the 9/11 ceremonies this year. (amNY)

Photos from the Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re yearning for the days of Mayor Bloomberg welcoming people into his administration with a handshake, an expectation of hard work, and a quiet “don’t fuck this up,” “The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg” may be the book for you. (Politico)

The “where are people going out right now” guide. (The Infatuation)