The Briefly for December 26, 2019 – The “Christmas Trees Don’t Belong on the Beach” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: When to throw out your Christmas tree, the secret economy and industry of five cent deposits, Cuomo’s feud with Trump heats up over weddings, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 45˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look back at the City Hall Christmas tree lighting, a bygone NYC tradition. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas has an 88-year history. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Video: The inspiring story of Sydney Mesher, the first Rockette with a visible disability. (The Rockettes)

Videos and Photos: The Saks Fifth Avenue Frozen 2 holiday lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

How long should you keep your Christmas tree up? At least until January 6, because that’s the first day of the Department of Sanitation’s tree disposal. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

Video: No matter what you read on Facebook, don’t leave your old Christmas tree at the beach. (Anginas Gonzalez for NY1)

Tompkins Square Park has some new trees. (EV Grieve)

Governor Cuomo vetoed a bill that would have allowed federal judges, Trump’s judges, to officiate weddings in New York state. I guess federal judges will have to become online ministers if they want to officiate weddings, just like the rest of us. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The fascinating history of 28 Old Fulton St, from old Dutch farmland to Revolutionary War battle site, from the Eagle pressroom to a warehouse for silver, furniture and then electoral ballots, to its latest use as luxury apartments. (Chase DiBenedetto for Bedford + Bowery)

Years ago two toy stores within a few blocks of each other would be at war around the holidays, but in 2019 Stationary and Toy World and West Side Kids in the Upper West Side are joining forces to fight back against online shopping. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: Got $75,000 lying around? You can afford one night at the Mark Hotel. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

With the mayor's potentially illegal "horse trading" collusion with ultra-Orthodox state lawmakers surrounding a Department of Education report about the quality of education at the city's yeshivas, advocates are calling for accountability. The city has made no indication of punishment for the 26 of 28 failing schools, instead requiring "timelines for improvement" by January 15 with no information about if schools fail to meet the deadline. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A state Supreme Court judge has struck down an upcoming New York City rule that would have restricted the amount of time app-based drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft can spend cruising without passengers below 96th Street in Manhattan. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Profiles of five African-American high-profile prisoners from New York City who were convicted of violent crimes that included murder and attempted murder. All committed their first crimes as teenagers. All are now in late middle age, ranging from 48 to 61 and seeking release. A great piece from students at CUNY's Craigs Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. (Stephanie Chukwuma, Trone Dowd, Jeffery Harrell, Brenda León, Hannah Miller, Rosemary Misdary, Rachel Rippetoe, Maria Robins-Somerville, Sean Sanders, and Annie Todd for Gothamist)

8 cultural attractions to visit on NYC’s Museum Mile. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

StreetEasy and Douglas Elliman appear to be ready to lock horns. While the details aren’t exciting, it could portend a coming fracturing of real estate listings. (E. B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

A train delay because of a pencil. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A Bronx police officer is facing accusations of groping a 14-year-old teenager while she was handcuffed in the back of a squad car last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Christmas is gone. No literally, Christmas is literally buried in Green-Wood Cemetery. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

The city doesn’t just get rid of its useless junk, it auctions it off. (Winnie Hu and James Sprankle for NY Times)

What’s the opposite of a Christmas miracle? Ask the 1,000 residents in NYCHA housing in Coney Island who woke up with no heat or hot water on Christmas. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

As of this week, bicyclists can use the walk/won’t walk indicators rather than the lights are use. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The latest in the seemingly never-ending battle of Industry City’s rezoning is that things are looking bleak for Industry City after the city is refusing to provide funds for new schools, housing and tenant programs to benefit the neighborhood. The decision to move forward rests with City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, who has been skeptical of the process since the start. It would be unheard of for the city to commit funds for a private application, Menchaca is justifying the request based on how dramatically the rezoning would change Sunset Park. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Has Midtown South become more pleasant for residents in the last few years? Finally, an answer to the eternal question of “who lives here?” (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

There is an entire underground economy centered around plastic bottle and metal can deposits, where the world turns five cents at a time. It’s all in a legal gray area that the city turns a blind eye towards, but once you have an understanding of how the canner economy works, you can understand why there is opposition to expanding the five cent deposit program. (Andy Newman for NY Times)

After eating at 300 restaurants this year, Scott Lynch picks his 16 best bites of 2019. (Scott Lynch for Eater)

The Briefly for July 16, 2018 – Baby Steps Towards Legal Pot, Cuomo Has a Buffalo Billions Problems, and More

The city is looking into helping renters with security deposits, the woman tax hits Washington, Cuomo tries to distance himself from multiple scandals, the red-tailed hawks are flying in Tompkins Square Park, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Up to 90% of the speedometers on D trains aren’t functioning properly. The MTA tells operators they should be able to tell their speed “by feel.”

The city’s nightlife advisory board has 14 new members.

“It hasn’t been a problem for the past 100 years, so I don’t know why it would be today” Governor Cuomo is trying to distance himself from former SUNY Poly president Alan Kaloyeros after Kaloyeros was convicted of bid-rigging last week as part of the “Buffalo Billions” program. This is the second scandal related to Governor Cuomo’s economic development projects.

New York took another baby step towards legalizing marijuana.

The parents of the four-year-old girl who was killed by a hit-and-run in Bushwick didn’t attend her funeral in her native Mexico out of fears of being unable to return to the US. They are both in the process of applying for green cards.

Shawn Williams was the 14th person to have their conviction overturned as a result of NYPD Detective Louis Scarella’s misconduct. Williams was in prison for 24 years.

Filming around town: The Other Two w/Robbie DeRaffele is at Marion Ave and E 188th in the Bronx, Erase w/Denis Leary is at 46th Ave and Vernon Boulevard in Queens, John Wick 3 w/Keanu Reeves is at Front St and Jay St in Brooklyn, Tell Me A Story w/Kim Cattrall is at Queens Plaza and 23rd Stis Queens, The Sun Is Also A Star w/Yara Shahidi is at Rutgers and Broadway, Amazon’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is at 21st Ave and Crescent St in Queens, Showtime’s Ray Donovan is at Church and Leonard St, Crashing w/Pete Holmes is at 3rd and 6th, and The Deuce w/James Franco is at E 96th and Madison.

An off-duty corrections officer pointed his gun at a stripper when she refused to go home with him.

Michael Palamar continues to work as a supervisor for the Parks Department earning over $100k annually after a 2009 conviction for sexually abusing a woman while he was on the job, a 1982 conviction for manslaughter, and now a lawsuit that alleges he pressured young female trainees for sexual favors, earning him the nickname of “pedophile” from his male co-workers.

Congresswoman Grace Meng from Flushing is fighting the woman tax in Washington after being denied reimbursement from Paul Ryan for feminine hygiene products for congressional staff and office visitors by requesting those items be made available for those who need them.

The city is paying $950k to a disabled teen after she was gang-assaulted in the stairwell of her high school and suspended when the school told her it was her fault.

The city is looking into helping renters when it comes to security deposits. Recommendations include capping security deposits at one month’s rent, paying security deposits monthly, or not requiring a security deposit in a renter has security insurance coverage.

A library card from the Brooklyn Library, Queens Library, or New York Public Library will get you free admission into 33 different cultural institutions once a year. The only catch is that you have to make reservations in advance.

The red-tailed hawks in Tompkins Square Park are growing up so fast!