The Briefly for November 24 – 26, 2020 – The “Staten Island is a Problem” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo’s Covid-19 announcement, Astor Place Hairstylists saved, 2020’s Thanksgiving parade, apartment lust, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

RIP David Dinkins, NYC’s first Black mayor. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

What you should know before getting testing for Covid-19. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what to expect from the Thanksgiving Day parade this year. (Gas Saltonstall for Patch)

5 places to get a vegetarian Thanksgiving meal. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

Tracy Morgan joined the non-profit Food Bank For New York City and Councilman Robert Cornegy in giving away 1,000 turkeys outside the Sumner Houses in Bed-Stuy. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

On Central Park’s Pilgrim Hill stands a statue “to commemorate the landing of the Pilgrim fathers on Plymouth Rock.” On the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landing, how appropriate that we’re about to all give each other disease while giving thanks. (Ephemeral New York)

Upper Manhattan and Staten Island are now Covid-19 yellow and orange zones. Staten Island is, in the words of Governor Cuomo, “a problem.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The state is reopening an emergency COVID-19 field hospital on Staten Island in South Beach to accommodate the uptick in hospitalizations. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The governor is in some hot water after letting it out that he had invited his mother and daughters over for Thanksgiving while telling the rest of us to stay distanced from each other. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

Cuomo isn’t the only elected official making idiotic moves this week. Mayoral hopeful Eric Adams decided that the middle of a pandemic is the perfect time to host an indoor fundraiser with 18 supporters on the Upper West Side. Technically, the NYC Sheriff should be fining Adams $15,000 for organizing and promoting a violation of the state’s rules regarding indoor dining. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

On the menu at City Winery? A mandatory $50 Covid-19 test. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Despite the drop in subway ridership, the number of incidents where someone was reported on the tracks is on pace to top last year’s number. (Jose Martinez for The City)

In response to an uptick in people being shoved onto subway tracks as of late, Mayor de Blasio says the NYPD presence on the subways will be increased. The mayor also noted that he hadn’t spoken to NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea about his plan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Blind Pig has begun its transformation into the new Coyote Ugly. (EV Grieve)

Bluestockings, which had closed earlier this year, has a new location and “a lot of magic is happening.” (Pooja Salhotra for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Lust: A four-floor, $4.85 million, 1899 Clinton Hill townhouse with wide outdoor space, a side-by-side dual shower (!!!), an open outdoor space, and five bedrooms. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

The Times is anticipating that the departure of Polly Trottenberg, the city’s Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, is the first in a long line of people who will be abandoning the mayor’s sinking ship as his term comes to a close. Trottenberg is most closely tied to Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero campaign, which aims to end traffic fatalities by 2024. Traffic fatalities are up this year. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This is unexpected. Governor Cuomo won an International Emmy award for his daily press briefings. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Video: A drone’s eye view of Harlem and Crown Heights. (Drone Fanatic)

Briget Rein, City Council Candidate for the 39th District in Brooklyn, is calling for a moratorium on Gowanus rezoning, citing the ULURP process cannot proceed fairly during a pandemic that would lock out the voices of many in the neighborhood, even if it was moved online. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Attention! There is a glut of apples and squash at the city’s farmer’s markets! (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Astor Place Hairstylists was saved by a group of extremely wealthy investors that would keep the barbershop open “for at least another 75 years.” Maybe spread some of that wealth to other businesses that are also being driven out of existence? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that Lavita McMath Turner will be its first chief diversity officer, five months after a staff letter urged the museum to look at the white supremacy and systemic racism in the institution. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio laid out the city’s strategy to get the city’s schools open. Students with disabilities will return first, following by early education programs, then elementary school students, then middle and high school students. This is assuming the city avoids the state’s “orange zone” status, which seems unlikely. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Beginning in 2021, the Democrats in the New York state senate will have a supermajority and the legislature will be able to stand up to and override vetos from Governor Cuomo. This is the first state supermajority since 1846. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

The story behind the closing of Gloria’s in Crown Heights goes back 20 years and might be one of the most bizarre stories of the entire year. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Up in the air! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a New York City property tax assessment drone! (Peter Senzamici for The City)

The best Black Friday + Cyber Week deals from NYC brands and small businesses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A wonderful story of how Ariel Cordova-Rojas saved a swan. How many times will you see a swan on the subway? (Troy Closson for NY Times)

In tribute to Century 21. (Reginald Ferguson for Brooklyn Based)

If you were one of the people who bought the “Virus Shut Out Cards,” congratulations, you’ve been scammed. (Payton Potter for Patch)

Apartment Lust: The photos of this $1.45 million Morningside Heights apartment may not look like much, but it was once the home of President Obama. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Behind the scenes with the decision by the de Blasio administration to close the city’s schools after the city hit a 3% positivity rate. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

With the GSA recognizing Biden as the winner of the presidential election, what’s the status of congestion pricing? Governor Cuomo doesn’t think it’s important enough to discuss with President-elect Biden. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

A look at how the city’s TV shows and movies resumed production. (Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

If you’ve been obsessing over Queen’s Gambit, maybe it’s time to explore NYC’s chess scene. (Victoria Choe for Untapped New York)

The best new delivery options in Manhattan. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of the ginkgo foliage at Broadway and 143rd!

The Briefly for June 6, 2019 – The “We Can’t Stop The Ratpocalypse or Rising Sea Levels” Edition

The MTA discrimination disability lawsuit can move forward, ThriveNYC is failing the city’s schools, Uber will helicopter you between Manhattan and JFK, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Uber is offering helicopter rides between lower Manhattan and JFK Airport. Uber Copter kicks off on July 9 and will be available during afternoon commutes. (NY Times)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development is pushing a new program that would name a “Tenant of Record,” which would end succession rights, which allows relatives to take over their homes after the primary resident dies or moves out. (Patch)

We are headed for a ratpocalypse. Is climate change to blame? (Grist)

Before steam, NYC homes were heated with coal. If you look carefully on some sidewalks you can still find “coal holes,” which allowed for easy delivery. (Ephemeral New York)

After 20 years and two locations, Park Slope’s gay bar Excelsior will close on July 31. This is the second closure due to rising rents. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sealed arrest record is supposed to reduce the unjust and disproportionately burdensome effect of those records on minorities. The NYPD has decided to have its own interpretation of the law. (Gothamist)

Congrats to this year’s Excellence in Design winners, which “reflect the very best of design in public works, housing, and libraries, parks, and public art.” (Curbed)

Notice something new floating around the city this week? The Sing for Hope pianos are back, celebrating their 500th piano. You’ve got until June 23 to find a piano in the city before they are donated to schools, healthcare facilities, and community centers. (Untapped Cities)

The NYPD is withholding its lists of which officers work at which precincts, claiming stating who is working where would endanger public safety. A lawsuit from the Legal Aid Society will decide if that reasoning is valid. (Patch)

A Midtown fender bender is not news, but it is when one of the cars is driven by Tracy Morgan and it’s a new $2 million Bugatti. (Gothamist)

It seems former prosecutor in the Central Park Five case Linda Fairstein doesn’t know about the Streisand Effect. The woman who coerced confessions from children about a crime they didn’t commit took to the internet to defend her honor after being forced to resign from Vassar’s board of trustees from a student body that did not want her there because of her involvement in the case. (The Root)

Where to eat something quick if you’re running late to a Broadway show. (The Infatuation)

How long would you stay in a rent-stabilized apartment if you could? Ed Higgins has been renting an apartment on Ludlow St for 43 years. His rent in 1976 was $100 a month and now it’s still under $600. (6sqft)

Polly Trottenberg, a voice of sanity on the MTA’s board, is resigning effective immediately upon being replaced. She was a de Blasio nomination in 2014 and has been highly critical of Governor Cuomo’s initiatives in the past. She did not state a reason for her resignation. (Politico)

What’s going on with the F train this week? A dead baby shark (do do do do do do) was found on an F train platform in Manhattan. (Gothamist)

The city’s Fair Fares program has 50,000 participants, and a big help was the expansion of the program in April. The program will expand in 2020 to any New Yorker living under the poverty line. (Curbed)

The de Blasio administration has begun seizing ice cream trucks from owners who are accused of evading nearly $4.5 million in fines. It seems that shell corporations aren’t just for our presidents anymore, because 76 ice cream trucks changed hands between shell corporations to avoid paying traffic and parking tickets. The city has seized 46 trucks so far. (Patch)

It seems the one thing the city’s politicians can agree on is the new entrance designs for Penn Station. (Downtown Express)

ThriveNYC provides no tangible support for the city’s students and councilmember Mark Treyger is calling for a “significant investment” in social and emotional services for students. There are over one million students in the city’s public schools and only 1,335 social workers, 2,958 guidance counselors and 560 school psychologists supporting those students. There are more safety agents than all those combined. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A paid witness used by the defense of Daniel Pantaleo, the officer accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, claimed Garner’s death could not have been caused by the hold. He was not present when it occurred and his appearance in court was paid by the defense. (amNY)

Over 100,000,000 have seen The Lion King on Broadway with over 9,000 performances, which are two staggering numbers. (CBS New York)

Councilman Antonio Reynoso announced he is running for Brooklyn Borough President once Eric Adams’ term limits have run out in 2021. (Brooklyn Paper)

After months of presentations and public feedback, the MTA announced a draft plan to improve the Bronx’s buses by improving speeds, reliability and streamlining routes that haven’t changed in decades. (Curbed)

The lawsuit against the MTA that would force the construction of elevators whenever a station is closed for improvements was given the go-ahead in the state’s supreme court, stating the MTA is not about the city’s Human Rights Law’s prohibition of discrimination based on disability. (amNY)

15 stellar spots for raw bar. (Eater)

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The Briefly for March 29, 2019 – The “The Final Year of Plastic Bags in New York” Edition

Mayor de Blasio is afraid to say “bike lane,” a protest in support of Kalman Yeger’s Palestine comments, the best pancakes, where to eat in the LES, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It’s the tail end of the month and no one can escape the weekend subway closures and diversions. (6sqft)

“We’re allowed our opinions… There is no such thing as Palestine… He tweeted the truth and we came here to stand up for him.” Welcome to the protest in support of Kalman Yeger’s “Palestine doesn’t exist” comment. Kalman Yeger is on the city’s immigration committee, and that is jeopardy now. (Bklyner)

Say farewell to single-use plastic bags at retail stores. (NY Times)

Barneys is going to give up more than half of its space on Madison Ave to cut back on its $30 million annual rent. This follows Lord & Taylor jettisoning their Fifth Ave store and the complete closure of Henri Bendel. (The Real Deal)

The state’s budget is due by midnight on Sunday, can the Governor and the legislature get their priorities in order to pass it? (Gotham Gazette)

Inside Whole Foods’ new convenience store in Chelsea. (Gothamist)

Want to live a long life? Move to Queens. Queens is in the top 20 counties in the country for life expectancy. (QNS)

Brooklyn’s most endangered buildings. (Curbed)

The Upper West Side’s best pancakes. KofiMania is running wild. (I Love The Upper West Side)

Kudos to the Coney Island Polar Bear Club for raising $60,000 during their New Year’s Day swim. The money will do towards half a dozen charities in and around Coney Island. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Some people argue at work and some Amtrak employees shoot their co-worker in the leg. (Gothamist)

Can the Knicks be freed from the tyranny of James Dolan? Can we ever be free from the awfulness of his band? (Gothamist)

New York is expanding its lawsuit the Sackler family, the billionaires behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson added his voice to those calling for the abolition of the Specialized High Schools Admission Test, in addition to expanding the number of city-designated elite high schools. (Chalkbeat)

The mayor’s claim of “fewer vehicles” is hard to believe when he makes a promise to reduce the city’s fleet by 1,000 when he added over 5,000 since being elected. (NY Post)

The proposed rezoning of Gowanus will add 8,200 new apartments to the neighborhood by 2035, including 3,000 that will be below market rate. The city published a draft scope of work, a step towards a land use review. (Curbed)

How the city influenced its baseball teams. (Streeteasy)

A ride on an NYC Ferry will cost you $2.75, but it could be costing the city an additional $24.75. (amNY)

Grub Street just couldn’t help themselves. They went around and tried to order the “St. Louis Style” bagel at a number of bagel places. (Grub Street)

Why is Mayor de Blasio afraid of saying “bike lanes” when it comes to Queens Blvd? (Streetsblog)

Something else the mayor can’t seem to do is pick a new head of NYCHA by the April 6 deadline. (NY Post)

Tracy Morgan has not forgotten his Brooklyn roots and paid for a makeover to the Bed-Stuy Marcy Houses where he grew up and partnered with GrowNYC, Feeding America, and City Harvest to improve the Harrie Carthan Community Garden. (amNY)

Parents can now remove a doctor’s name from a birth certificate if their license was suspended for misconduct or abuse. (NY Post)

If you love being creeped out, you can now book an overnight stay at Madame Tussauds in Times Square. (Time Out)

Where to eat on the Lower East Side. (The Infatuation)

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