The Briefly for July 2, 2020 – The “Eating Outdoors in the New Eating Indoors” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The July 4th flyover, digging deeper into the budget, the building collapse in Carroll Gardens, mass transit returns to normal for July 4, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

The MTA announced normal weekend service for July 4 to meet the expected demand for the city’s beaches on a combination of the first weekend with lifeguards and a holiday. (Robert Pozarycki for Bronx Times)

The Department of Defense announced a flyover of NYC on July 4 as part of the “2020 Salute to America.” Yes, definitely a year worth saluting. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Video: Tuesday’s unannounced fireworks show was near the Statue of Liberty at 11 pm. At 11 pm, is there anything distinction between the Macy’s and illegal fireworks? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Indoor dining is off the proverbial table for phase three, as expected. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

According to the NYC Hospitality Alliance, only one-fifth of bars and restaurants were able to pay their June bills on time. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork)

“Surely, some people will still insist on dining out anyway. Perhaps they’ve assessed that the chances of falling ill are acceptable, or that they’re ready to tough it out if they get sick. So allow me to recount what it’s actually like to catch COVID-19 — and I was one of the lucky ones.”
-Ryan Sutton for Eater, Why This Restaurant Critic Isn’t Dining Out Right Now

The argument for tipping 50% when dining outdoors. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The NYC budget moves school safety officers from the NYPD’s budget to the Department of Educations budget, but it also imposes a hiring freeze on new teachers and reduces the number of school counselors. In the words of City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, this is “not a people victory.” (Annie Todd for Gothamist)

“Does it mean I’m less safe? Where do you take the billion dollars from? Does it mean I’m more safe? Does it have any effect on police abuse? I don’t know what it means.” Governor Cuomo encapsulates the entire conversation coming out of the NYC budget‘s shifting around of the NYPD budget, pointing out that the city has to “redesign the whole relationship” between the NYPD and its citizens. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Also included in the city’s budget is an 11% cut to cultural affairs, which includes after-school programs, funding for the Cultural Immigrant Initiative, the Coalition of Theaters of Color, the Bronx Children’s Museum, BAM’s arts instruction in schools, the city’s four zoos and aquarium, and more. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

The city’s budget cut the Fair Fares program by $65 million, which helps subsidize low-income New Yorkers’ mass transit, in a financial hit to low-income New Yorkers and the MTA. MTA Chairpowerson Pat Foye says congestion pricing is a virtual impossibility” thanks to the federal government and the pandemic. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s taken over three years, but the first street in the city’s Great Streets pilot program is complete. Atlantic Ave in East New York and Cypress Hills was rebuilt with updates to traffic safety, new curbs, water mains, trees, and fire hydrants, and more quality of life upgrades. (East New York News)

“I don’t know what the landlord can do and where the rent strike can take us. It’s frustrating. You’re sitting down with all these things, but you don’t know what to do; you don’t know where to turn and everywhere you turn it’s “Oh, your income is not enough.”” – Five stories from New Yorkers of what it’s like not paying rent. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

How do white people in a mostly white neighborhood stand up for BIPOC? Lessons learned on being an effective ally from a protest in Greenpoint. (Melissa Kravitz Joeffner for Greenpointers)

How much does it cost in the first year of dog companionship in NYC? According to a new study, the price of a new best friend is $3,823.05 for the first year and $2,351 for each subsequent year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

2020’s most popular dog breed in the city is the Havanese according to the website Rover. I’m not sure this includes mutts, like my Scooter and Pepper. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

227 Duffield Street will be considered for landmark status. The address has been at the center of a preservationist fight for over a decade, as the house was associated with the abolitionist movement and a stop on the Underground Railroad. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Video: A look back in time at Harry Nugent, the city’s most beloved subway conductor. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

John Mullaly might be seen as the father of New York City parks, but he’s also credited for instigating the notorious Draft Riots of 1863 and for his racist views on Black people. That’s why activists are calling for removal of his name from Mullaly Park, a neighbor to Yankee Stadium and in a majority-minority neighborhood. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

After spending years as Mayor de Blasio’s mouthpieces, Press Secretary Freddi Goldstein and Communications Director Wiley Norvell are quitting. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

How did you celebrate Bobby Bonilla Day on July 1? If you are Bobby Bonilla, you were paid $1,193,248.20 by the Mets to not play for the Mets, just like you have been for nearly 20 years and like you will be through 2035. (Alex Mitchell for QNS)

A former Pret A Manger employee filed a lawsuit, alleging that its employees “created and fostered a discriminatory and hostile work environment” against her while she worked in several of the company’s NYC stores. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Info on Wednesday’s building collapse in Carroll Gardens. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New voter registrations were down 50% in NYC in 2020 compared to 2019, creating worries about the November elections and amplifying calls for online voter registration. (Christine Chung for The City)

Some Queens NYCHA residents have been living with no gas for cooking since before the pandemic started. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

Harlem’s Marcus Garvey, Jackie Robinson, and Wagner Houses pools will open on August 1. Across the city, 15 pools will open by August 1. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

11 outdoor bars, parklets, rooftops, and restaurants to chill out at this summer. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Thanks to reader Victor for today’s featured photo from Domino Park

The Briefly for June 25, 2020 – The “Beaches Will Open on July 1” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 23 more miles of open streets, the best and worst of takeout and delivery, the MTA moves to stop all construction projects, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 84˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

It took the threat of the City Council forcing his hand, but Mayor de Blasio announced the city’s beaches will fully open on July 1. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Anyone traveling to New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut from states with Covid-19 outbreaks must undergo a 14-day isolation period under threat of fines that range from $2,000 to $10,000. It was announced at noon on Wednesday and went into effect at midnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The New York Marathon was canceled for 2020 and hopes to return in 2021. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

The best and worst of NYC takeout and delivery. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 hiking trails in the city to try this summer. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A spokesperson for New York City’s largest charter network resigned in protest, stating she can no longer defend Success Academy’s “racist and abusive practices” that are “detrimental to the emotional well being” of its students. (Alex Zimmerman for ChalkBeat)

New York is one of three states that is “close” to containing the coronavirus, according to the group Covid Act Now. New Jersey and Massachusetts are the other two. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The MTA is exploring the idea of using artificial intelligence to track how many subway riders are wearing face masks. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The MTA, being the MTA, is stopped all planned upgrades to subways and installing new elevators because of its financial situation. Nothing says “planning for the future” like “no updates to an already crumbling system.” Some of these repairs include bringing subway stations into compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, structural repairs to the 7 line, which was falling apart in Queens before the pandemic, and updating the signals on the A/C/E lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Say hello to the idea of the Queens Ribbon, a proposed new bridge that would like Long Island City, Roosevelt Island, and Midtown Manhattan for pedestrians and cyclists. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Major League Baseball agreed with the players union and “spring” training starts on July 1 for a 60 game season that will start on July 23 or 24. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Stonewall Inn is facing an “uncertain future” and started up a second GoFundMe to raise $100,000. Their first GoFundMe is for the staff. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Farewell to the Times Square McDonalds after 17 years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The Times throws some cold water on the fireworks conspiracies. Phantom Fireworks, one of the largest warehouses in PA is running a buy-one-get-two-free sale. (Mihir Zaveri, Allie Conti and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

The percentages of Black members of the NYPD have grown among captains or above and lieutenants, but the percentage of Black officers has fallen since 2008 among sergeants, detectives, and patrol officers. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

A look at NYPD’s use of helicopters for intimidation and surveillance during George Floyd protests, occasionally flying only 100 over sea level. Each helicopter is equipped with infrared cameras and a laptop that can zoom in on individual faces. The FAA recommends helicopters fly at an altitude of 1,0000 at the lowest. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

A new study from The Health Department shows the city underreported NYPD-related deaths, including a dozen deaths of unarmed people of color over five years. Between 2010 and 2015, the number was reported as 46, but research shows identified 105 deaths. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

When an NYPD SUV drove into a group of protesters, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says they didn’t violate policy and they came out with “no injuries to anyone.” (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

“Last Halloween, my wife and then-6-year-old daughter were making their way home after trick-or-treating in Brooklyn. Suddenly, an unmarked NYPD car with sirens wailing began speeding against traffic up a one-way street, our neighborhood’s main thoroughfare. The officer seemed to be going after a few teenage boys.

Then, in an instant, the car hit one of the kids.”
-Eric Umansky for ProPublica, My Family Saw a Police Car Hit a Kid on Halloween. Then I Learned How NYPD Impunity Works.

Starting Tuesday night, activists have occupied City Hall Park with a plan to stay through the end of the month, calling for a reduction in the NYPD’s budget by $1 billion. (Sydney Pereira and Scott Heins for Gothamist)

The city will paint a Black Lives Matter mural on the street in front of Trump Tower. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Photos: The history of the Dyke March. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

New York City does not plan to offer in-person classes this summer for students with disabilities. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Mayor de Blasio announced 23 miles of new open streets, including nine miles of temporarily protected bike lanes. It brings the total milage to 67, short of his promise to open 100 miles by the end of this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor announced the city might have to lay off or furlough 22,000 municipal workers this fall to help close the city’s budget gap. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

After another mess of an election day in NYC, there is another round of calls to reform how we vote to make elections more inclusive and fair. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re planning on doing outdoor dining, check ahead to see if you’ll need reservations. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

10 excellent places for takeout in Queens. (Joe DeStefano for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Ryan for sending in today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 22, 2020 – The “An Answer to Our Collective Fireworks Question” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC starts reopening phase two, Tuesday is primary day, the only true New Yorker, an NYPD cop uses an illegal chokehold, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

A boy caught a 20-pound catfish in Central Park using a bagel as bait. When we have conversations about who is a “real” New Yorker, this catfish deserves to be a part of the conversation. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Tuesday is a 2020 primary in New York for much more than the Democratic presidential nominee. Here’s your guide to the local races. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you applied for an absentee ballot and it hasn’t arrived, here’s what to do. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

This weekend was the breaking point based on everyone in the city going to Twitter to complain about fireworks. Firework complaints are up 230x in June. What the hell is going on? (Sydney Pereira, Beth Fertig, David Cruz, Jake Dobkin, and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there’s a real answer to what the hell is going on. According to Dave Hill, all of the fireworks shows in the Northeast have been canceled and fireworks vendors are up to their ears in pro-grade fireworks. Thanks to supply and demand, dealers have turned to the black market and are trying to unload their fireworks for any price. (@DaveHill77)

“Everywhere I go it smells the same, and it smells like my breath.” Let’s check-in with David Sedaris. (Sarah Lyall for NY Times)

A guide to phase two’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Phase two means something big: Offices are open once more. If companies decide to reopen their offices? That’s a different story. (Michael Gold and Troy Closson for NY Times)

A 1.9-acre waterfront park and small beach is coming to the Bushwick Inlet Park, which was approved by the Parks and Waterfront Committee of Brooklyn’s Community Board 1. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a piece of history off the beaten path? Check out Jackie Robinson’s house on Tilden Ave. (Untapped New York for Michelle Young)

After 96 days, Governor Cuomo’s daily press conferences have come to an end. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Half of New York’s working-class immigrants have lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study by the Center for Urban Future. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

How many days has it been since the passing of the Eric Garner Chokehold Ban? An NYPD officer was suspended without pay after being caught on video using an illegal chokehold on an unarmed Black man in Queens. (Mark Hallum and Zach Gewelb for amNewYork Metro)

86.4% of tickets for biking on the sidewalk in 2018 and 2019 went to Black and Hispanic New Yorkers, even though they comprise only 49 percent of cyclists. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Dominique Alexander was found hanging from a tree last week in Fort Tryon Park in Manhattan, his death was ruled a suicide. Alexander’s death is one of many deaths of Black men that have been ruled a suicide after being found hanging from trees. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There were reports of three nooses being hung in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx on Juneteenth. The NYPD declined to open an investigation, claiming the ropes were nothing more than harmless string. This is the second investigation into a noose left in a city park that the NYPD has refused or closed without a thorough investigation. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Vincent D’Andraia, the cop that was suspended for showing a protester to the ground and was charged with misdemeanor assault has a history of 11 allegations of misconduct since 2015. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Students at predominantly Black New York City schools are significantly less likely to have a positive view of school police or to believe school discipline is applied fairly. If that’s your assumption, there’s a new study that confirms your assumption. (Jessica Gould, Alex Zimmerman, and Gabrielle LaMarr LeMee and Gothamist)

New York City’s education oversight board is calling for public schools, not the police, to manage the officers stationed on city campuses. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

“The Case for Self-Enforcing Streets” from Transportation Alternatives argues that the NYPD should be removed from traffic enforcement, calling for an expansion in enforcement technology, changing how crash investigations work, and more. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Hundreds of protesters marched on Astoria Blvd in Queens demanding the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The American Museum of Natural History expressed plans to have the statue of Theodore Roosevelt removed from its entrance on Central Park West for its racist depictions of Native American and African figures. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

While we’re talking about statues, let’s encourage the Long Island town of Babylon to tear down their statue of Robert Moses. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

“Mayor de Blasio could have acted all along. He could have called for the NYPD to make officers’ disciplinary records public. He could have fired Officer Pantaleo immediately after he murdered Eric Garner. Mayor de Blasio knows how this all works, but benefits from the opaqueness that characterizes the political system in this city and state. He has amplified the problem with the system.”
-New Kings Democrats, Mayor de Blasio is neither progressive nor effective. He needs to resign

Juneteenth will become a city holiday in 2021. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Photos: Juneteenth celebrations across the city. (Sophia Chang, photos by Angela Chalmondeley, Khaleeq Alfred, and Gretchen Robinette for Gothamist)

NYC Parks installed “Juneteenth Grove” at Cadman Plaza Park “in celebration of Juneteenth and to celebrate the homegoing of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and countless others.” (Mary Kim for Brooklyn Heights Blog)

Downtown Brooklyn and Park Slope are getting new bike lanes this summer on Smith St, Fourth Ave, and Navy Street. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Another week and another local racist caught on camera. This time it was in Flushing Queens where a man with a face mask pulled down yelled slurs at a South Korean student inside a 7-Eleven. The NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s been 63 years since the legendary brawl at the Copacabana that involved six hall of fame Yankees and their wives while celebrating Billy Martin’s birthday. Finally, the truth has come out. (David Margolick for NY Times)

The Yankees and Mets have announced that their, uh, “spring” training will be happening in New York and not Florida. (Priscila Korb for Patch)

Is wearing a mask getting in your way of drinking? Check out Crook & Marker’s TasteMask, which includes a flap for a straw. (Bao Ong for The Out)

Thanks to reader Hannah for today’s featured photo!