The Briefly for November 24 – 26, 2020 – The “Staten Island is a Problem” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo’s Covid-19 announcement, Astor Place Hairstylists saved, 2020’s Thanksgiving parade, apartment lust, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

RIP David Dinkins, NYC’s first Black mayor. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

What you should know before getting testing for Covid-19. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what to expect from the Thanksgiving Day parade this year. (Gas Saltonstall for Patch)

5 places to get a vegetarian Thanksgiving meal. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

Tracy Morgan joined the non-profit Food Bank For New York City and Councilman Robert Cornegy in giving away 1,000 turkeys outside the Sumner Houses in Bed-Stuy. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

On Central Park’s Pilgrim Hill stands a statue “to commemorate the landing of the Pilgrim fathers on Plymouth Rock.” On the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landing, how appropriate that we’re about to all give each other disease while giving thanks. (Ephemeral New York)

Upper Manhattan and Staten Island are now Covid-19 yellow and orange zones. Staten Island is, in the words of Governor Cuomo, “a problem.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The state is reopening an emergency COVID-19 field hospital on Staten Island in South Beach to accommodate the uptick in hospitalizations. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The governor is in some hot water after letting it out that he had invited his mother and daughters over for Thanksgiving while telling the rest of us to stay distanced from each other. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

Cuomo isn’t the only elected official making idiotic moves this week. Mayoral hopeful Eric Adams decided that the middle of a pandemic is the perfect time to host an indoor fundraiser with 18 supporters on the Upper West Side. Technically, the NYC Sheriff should be fining Adams $15,000 for organizing and promoting a violation of the state’s rules regarding indoor dining. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

On the menu at City Winery? A mandatory $50 Covid-19 test. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Despite the drop in subway ridership, the number of incidents where someone was reported on the tracks is on pace to top last year’s number. (Jose Martinez for The City)

In response to an uptick in people being shoved onto subway tracks as of late, Mayor de Blasio says the NYPD presence on the subways will be increased. The mayor also noted that he hadn’t spoken to NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea about his plan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Blind Pig has begun its transformation into the new Coyote Ugly. (EV Grieve)

Bluestockings, which had closed earlier this year, has a new location and “a lot of magic is happening.” (Pooja Salhotra for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Lust: A four-floor, $4.85 million, 1899 Clinton Hill townhouse with wide outdoor space, a side-by-side dual shower (!!!), an open outdoor space, and five bedrooms. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

The Times is anticipating that the departure of Polly Trottenberg, the city’s Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, is the first in a long line of people who will be abandoning the mayor’s sinking ship as his term comes to a close. Trottenberg is most closely tied to Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero campaign, which aims to end traffic fatalities by 2024. Traffic fatalities are up this year. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This is unexpected. Governor Cuomo won an International Emmy award for his daily press briefings. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Video: A drone’s eye view of Harlem and Crown Heights. (Drone Fanatic)

Briget Rein, City Council Candidate for the 39th District in Brooklyn, is calling for a moratorium on Gowanus rezoning, citing the ULURP process cannot proceed fairly during a pandemic that would lock out the voices of many in the neighborhood, even if it was moved online. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Attention! There is a glut of apples and squash at the city’s farmer’s markets! (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Astor Place Hairstylists was saved by a group of extremely wealthy investors that would keep the barbershop open “for at least another 75 years.” Maybe spread some of that wealth to other businesses that are also being driven out of existence? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that Lavita McMath Turner will be its first chief diversity officer, five months after a staff letter urged the museum to look at the white supremacy and systemic racism in the institution. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio laid out the city’s strategy to get the city’s schools open. Students with disabilities will return first, following by early education programs, then elementary school students, then middle and high school students. This is assuming the city avoids the state’s “orange zone” status, which seems unlikely. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Beginning in 2021, the Democrats in the New York state senate will have a supermajority and the legislature will be able to stand up to and override vetos from Governor Cuomo. This is the first state supermajority since 1846. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

The story behind the closing of Gloria’s in Crown Heights goes back 20 years and might be one of the most bizarre stories of the entire year. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Up in the air! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a New York City property tax assessment drone! (Peter Senzamici for The City)

The best Black Friday + Cyber Week deals from NYC brands and small businesses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A wonderful story of how Ariel Cordova-Rojas saved a swan. How many times will you see a swan on the subway? (Troy Closson for NY Times)

In tribute to Century 21. (Reginald Ferguson for Brooklyn Based)

If you were one of the people who bought the “Virus Shut Out Cards,” congratulations, you’ve been scammed. (Payton Potter for Patch)

Apartment Lust: The photos of this $1.45 million Morningside Heights apartment may not look like much, but it was once the home of President Obama. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Behind the scenes with the decision by the de Blasio administration to close the city’s schools after the city hit a 3% positivity rate. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

With the GSA recognizing Biden as the winner of the presidential election, what’s the status of congestion pricing? Governor Cuomo doesn’t think it’s important enough to discuss with President-elect Biden. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

A look at how the city’s TV shows and movies resumed production. (Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

If you’ve been obsessing over Queen’s Gambit, maybe it’s time to explore NYC’s chess scene. (Victoria Choe for Untapped New York)

The best new delivery options in Manhattan. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of the ginkgo foliage at Broadway and 143rd!

The Briefly for October 25 – 26, 2020 – The “Vote or Die” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Early voting is open, the best Vietnamese food in the city, dredging the Gowanus, Mayor de Blasio’s legacy of failure, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 56˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

The best restaurants near NYC’s early voting locations. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Early voting is open, now let’s talk about the legality of ballot selfies. (Valeriya Safronova for NY Times)

Speaking of early voting, it started across the city on Saturday and there were lines everywhere. Nearly 100,0000 voted on the first day of early voting, more than in all of 2018’s early voting. (David Cruz and Jen Chung for Gothamist)

On Friday, Mayor de Blasio announced a plan to recruit hundreds of city workers in a matter of days to join an “Election Observer Corps.” He has not recruited a single person, nor has he trained anyone. By contrast, AG Letitia James, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, and the head of Common Cause NY, Susan Lerner, already have 600 statewide volunteers who have been training for weeks for the election and have been monitoring polling sites already. Seems like the mayor could have endorsed this effort instead of announcing a new one less than 24 hours before early voting began. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

We will have hundreds of additional cops in uniform citywide who will be at the ready should they be needed.” -NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan, who maybe doesn’t realize that having a larger NYPD presence during an election may only serve to make things worse. (Danny Lewish for Gothamist)

This is the same NYPD whose union endorsed President Trump. (NBC New York)

Photos and Video: A Barred Owl hanging out. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Video: The Animal Care Centers rescued a pig from a Brooklyn backyard. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The city sells off unpaid property debts on a regular basis. The sale of debt was the subject of a Last Week Tonight program from a few years ago. While it raises money for the city, it also encourages foreclosures and the displacement of lower-income homeowners. This year’s tax lien sale has been postponed multiple times and City Council members are pushing to eliminate the program altogether. (Peter Senzamici for The City)

The EPA will begin dredging the Gowanus Canal mid-November. At the bottom of the canal sits a very thick and very old layer of tar, human poop and if the rumors are true, a few dead bodies. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Video: No questions asked about how these daredevils found their way to the roof of the GE Building, which is closed to visitors, but the views are spectacular. (svvvk on YouTube)

State officials have pulled a controversial proposal that would have allowed non-lawyers to oversee special education complaints in New York City. The proposal was first made in January. In the 2019-2020 school year, the city had 10,797 complaints, 96% of New York state’s complaints. Each complaint is legally supposed to be resolved in under 75 days, but NYC’s cases take 259 days on average. The penalty for such a failure? Nothing. These students deserve better. (Reema Amin for The City)

Interview: Meet Brenda Suchilt, the Newtown Creek Alliance’s new horticulturist. (Billy McEntee for Greenpointers)

Apartment Porn: A $12.75 million Cobble Hill townhouse with a vineyard-like garden that’s bigger than almost every bar with outdoor space, gated parking, and two wine cellars. One wine cellar? Please. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The best Vietnamese restaurants in NYC. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The secrets of the new Greenpoint public library. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The number of young children in NYCHA housing at risk of lead exposure is three times greater than previously thought, according to Bart Schwartz, the federal monitor overseeing the NYCHA. The city certified the number at 3,000 two years ago. The number is 9,000. Poisoning the children of the city will likely end up high on the list of Bill de Blasio’s legacy as mayor. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Speaking of Bill de Blasio’s accomplishments and legacy, the city is headed for the highest level of traffic deaths since the mayor took office, the third straight year of rising deaths, completely erasing any and all progress he could claim as part of his own Vision Zero program. This year includes two months of zero traffic fatalities due to the pandemic, it’s hard to imagine how high the body count would be without it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel has just reopened its pool-cuzzi and Runway Chalet at JFK airport. The pool purifies itself every 30 minutes and is kept at a cozy 95 degrees. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A look at the new public art available across Brooklyn. (Keira Wingate for Bklyner)

Three bars within the zoned shutdown areas in Brooklyn and Queens had their liquor licenses temporarily suspended for throwing illegal indoor parties. 30 Fantastic Bar in Sunset Park, Da Mikelle Palace in Forest Hills, and Wise Bar & Grill in Sheepshead Bay. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Before you feel bad for The Strand posting they may close (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan), let’s look a little deeper. The Strand fired union workers while accepting $1-2 million of PPP loans (Labor Notes) Owner Nancy Bass Wyder, who is married to Oregon Senator Ron Wyden, purchased $115,000 in Amazon stock in April and made an additional purchase of up to $200,000 in June. (Ed Lin for Barrons) The Upper West Side location was met with protests. (Carol Tannenhauser and Kate Koza for West Side Rag) On a micro scale, buying at The Strand instead of your neighborhood bookstore is no different than buying from Amazon.

On a micro scale, supporting The Strand over your neighborhood bookstore is akin to buying from Amazon instead of locally.

At this point, let’s celebrate that NYC isn’t the rattiest city in America. Los Angeles and Chicago are worse than we are and you take the wins where you can get them. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Times Square really wants you to visit. Their latest ploy to get you to the one place you never want to visit is the Taste of Times Square Week, which runs through October 30 and offers a $35 prix fixe menu at 20 different restaurants with an appetizer, main and dessert. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Shed in Hudson Yards has reopened with a solo exhibition by artist Howardena Pindell called Rope/Fire/Water, which explores the historical traumas of America, namely slavery, racism, and white supremacy. (Monika Hankova for Untapped New York)

An examination of how New York’s slavery history is still present all over the city. (Zachary Kussin for Untapped New York)

The Green-Wood Cemetery is hosting a Dia de los Muertos celebration all this week. (Dozier Hasty for Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Mapo Tofu in the city. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Michael for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for October 16 – 17, 2020 – The “Greatest Mystery of 2020” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: NYPD’s Chief of Patrol resigns, the new rules for outdoor dining, how to negotiate rent, all the mayoral candidates dunk on de Blasio & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Rain throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 48˚ High: 62˚

Video: Watch the congressional debate between Congressmember Max Rose and NY Assemblyperson Nicole Malliotakis. Vote for Max Rose. (NY1)

“Time and time again, Trump-loving State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis has used votes and influence as an elected official to fight against efforts to improve LGBTQ rights — and there’s a chance she could bring her bigoted politics to the national stage.”
-Matt Tracy, Nicole Malliotakis’ Dismal Record on LGBTQ Issues for Gay City News

Farewell to Dangerfield’s on the Upper East Side, which was forced to close after 50 years. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

This is, and I can’t understate this enough, the greatest mystery of the year. (EV Grieve)

City civilian inspectors gave out 1,095 Covid-19 safety measure violations to 247 spots between Sept. 29 and Oct. 13, according to Mayor de Blasio’s office. The biggest offense? Lack of cleaning log. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Another fight in the endless battle between Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio: if yeshivas can decide they’re “childcare centers to skirt the state’s red zone rules. Cuomo says no, of course, the mayor disagrees. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo has gone as far as saying that he’ll revoke funding from non-compliant yeshivas, threatening to “withhold funding until the matter is resolved to our satisfaction.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

52% of the city’s public school students are enrolled in remote learning. That’s a 2% increase from last week. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Juneteenth is now an official public holiday in New York State. Governor Cuomo signed it into legislation this week, beating Mayor de Blasio to the punch, who claimed he would make it a holiday in the city by 2021. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

Apartment Porn: A $6.25 million Brooklyn Heightsfive-bedroom townhouse with a velour reading nook, a backyard, and lots of color. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The NYPD is preparing for election protests according to a new memo issued by Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Attorney General Letitia James is recommending that the NYPD be removed from conducting traffic stops after the fatal shooting of Allan Feliz, whom cops killed during a so-called routine traffic stop in the Bronx last year. Her recommendation is to shift to automated enforcement and redesigning roads to make it harder to speed and break traffic rules. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The New York Philharmonic canceled all of its performances through June 2021. This is an extension of their previous cancelation that was scheduled to end January 5. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

A statue of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is coming to Downtown Brooklyn’s City Point in 2021. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Speaking of statues, check out the new sculpture of Medusa holding the decapitated of Perseus that is now outside the New York County Criminal Courthouse on Centre Street. The sculpture was created by artist Luciano Garbati. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city has new rules for outdoor dining this winter that will allow for electric heaters, natural gas heaters, and propane heaters. Maybe it’s time to invest in some “restaurant blankets.” (Will Gleason for Time Out)

For now, here’s a list of restaurants with outdoor heating lamps. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Grand Central is looking to alter its rent agreement with its tenants, with the MTA will take a percentage of rent from the restaurants and other small businesses based on gross revenue. Apple won’t be getting a break, just the smaller businesses. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

No need to panic (yet), but State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said that without federal aid, we’re looking at “the end of regional public transit as we have known it.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

What we’re talking about when we say tax the rich. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

“After hearing that I would be kicked out of the Lucerne, I felt traumatized – dehumanized at the thought of being moved from shelter to shelter like a pawn on a chessboard during a global pandemic. The words of the mayor brought back thoughts of traumatic experiences from my past, as a young child growing up in New York City’s foster care system.”
-Shams DaBaron, City’s Move to Vacate UWS Hotel Shelter is Adding ‘Trauma on Top of Trauma,’ Resident Says for City Limits

How to negotiate rent on a city apartment. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

In May, Mayor de Blasio assembled a Surface Transportation Advisory Council to provide suggestions to keep people safe as the city reopens. The mayor has ignored all of their recommendations has not responded to their open letter written on September 1. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s five head “neighborhood policing” effort has done little to slow crime or eliminate racial bias in who gets charged, according to a new study. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

With less than a year in the position, NYPD Chief of Patrol Fausto Pichardo decided to reture. Reports say that he was a “leave the NYPD alone” guy and “always hated the mayor.” (Jake Offenhartz, Jen Chung, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has denied there was “friction” between him and Pichardo, so you there was friction. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Gallery: The spooky homes of NYC. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Maybe we all need to embrace this makeshift shrine to Mercury that was left at the Utica Ave A/C stop. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here are the 2020 Tony Award nominees. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The first virtual mayoral forum featuring seven potential mayoral candidates was held this week and there was one thing they all had in common. No one likes the mayor. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The 10 best bánh mì in the city. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)