The Briefly for March 27, 2020 – The “No One is Stopping You From Leaving” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The best to-go cocktails available, hospitals begin to share ventilators, the Brooklyn Navy Yard steps up, restaurants become wine shops, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 56˚

Okay, real question. How do we do our laundry now? (Sanam Yar for NY Times)

Here’s what you can and can’t do in the city right now. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

When the governor announced that the state would be making 100,000 gallons of hand sanitizer a week using prison labor, we were a little short on details and we still are. The sanitizer is being bottled in state prisons by Corcraft, the public-facing brand name of the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision’s Division of Industries, but as the reporting has discovered, it’s unknown where it’s actually being produced. (Katie Way for VICE)

The summer is approaching, when the city’s wealthy abandon our streets and flee upstate and to the Hamptons. Despite calls for a vacation home travel ban, the governor has no plans to put one in place. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

Here are the streets the city will close this weekend to give us some space. There is one closure in each borough. One. Instead of creating more space for us to stretch out in, the city has created one destination inside each borough, especially the six blocks of Park Ave in Midtown. I predict this pilot program will be hailed as a success because of this weekend’s rain and not because one street in each borough was closed. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’ve got a bike gathering dust, donate it to someone who needs it. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Choice bike rides in each borough, even if the weather this weekend isn’t looking great for a leisurely ride. (Lillia Panych for Untapped New York)

It seems we can’t be trusted with basketball courts without breaking physical distancing guidelines, so the basketball hoops in 80 parks across the city have been removed. (Greenpointers)

For the third time this week a Trader Joe’s store, the Chelsea location, is closed due to multiple staffers testing positive for COVID-19. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of one couple who saw the ban on partners in the delivery room at NewYork-Presbyterian, left the city. (Catherine Pearson for HuffPost)

Revel quietly expanded its service area into Manhattan, above 65th Street, and doubled the area in Brooklyn and Queens. Healthcare workers can receive free rides by registering online. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Where to find a birthday cake in the age of the coronavirus. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Imagine you’re a college student and you’re given 24 hours to vacate your dorm room. Now Imagine the world went to shit while you were on Spring Break and you never went back to the college because all classes were held online. If you don’t live near the city, how do you vacate your dorm room? What if you’re a student who lives abroad but is studying in New York? What do you do with 24 hours to go home? (Dylan Campbell for Gothamist)

Some restaurants with expansive wine catalogs are pivoting during the pandemic and becoming impromptu wine shops, offering a selection of bottles that would otherwise be difficult to find. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Hey drivers, don’t be idiots just because the roads are clear. Exactly what this city doesn’t need is more people in hospitals, like this five-vehicle accident on Ocean Parkway. (Julianna Cuba for Streetsblog)

Governors Ball is canceled. Refunds are available or you can transfer your ticket to next year. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Legal Aid filed suit against New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services Wednesday requesting the immediate release of 22 teens, ages 13 through 17, held on Family Court charges at detention facilities. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I never thought I would write those words, but I do miss the tourists.” Is it crazy to miss the tourists on the Brooklyn Bridge or are we all yearning for the resemblance of normalcy? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Freelancers Union is launching the Freelancers Relief Fund, a direct aid fund that will help independent workers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic so they can pay for their expenses like rent, utilities, and groceries. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Advice: What you can do if you can’t pay your mortgage or rent due to the pandemic. (Cate Corcoran for Brownstoner)

Where to get sushi delivery and takeout, mostly in Manhattan. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Amateur Night at the Apollo is going all digital. (Devi Lockwood for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has sprung into action during previous world wars and crises, and this is no different. Bednark, a manufacturing company, is churning out thousands of face shields a day. Kings County Distillery and perfume company DS. & Gurga are making sanitizer and tailor Kingsbridge is making face masks. They didn’t call it “The Can-Do Shipyard” for nothing. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Photo: You approach a roll of pristine toilet paper on the street. What do you do? (EV Grieve)

The Four Seasons Hotel in New York City will be providing health care workers responding to the coronavirus pandemic with free lodging. (Jenna Amatulli for HuffPost)

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has begun sharing ventilators between two patients because “the other option is death.” (Brian M. Rosenthal, Jennifer Pinkowski and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

RIP Fred “Curly” Neal, one of the Harlem Globetrotters’ biggest stars. (Marc Stein for NY Times)

The Tenement Museum is struggling to stay afloat, as the COVID-19 shutdown eliminated foot traffic and steady funding. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The best to-go cocktails available right now at bars and restaurants in NYC. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for February 3, 2020 – The “Dropping the Ball, Not the Groundhog” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: How NYC became “Gotham,” Governor Cuomo’s ego pushed Andy Byford out, the mayor ignoes his BQE panel, the best restaurants in Sunset Park and more.

Today – Low: 41˚ High: 51˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

16 places to celebrate Black History Month in NYC. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Interested in changing your political party affiliation before the June primaries? Act quickly, the deadline is February 14th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Staten Island’s Chuck the Groundhog didn’t see his shadow on Sunday morning, which means that an early spring should be on its way. At least no one dropped him. (Adams Nichols for Patch)

Let’s never forget when Mayor de Blasio murdered Staten Island Chuck by dropping him on Groundhog’s Day. Chuck died a week after the drop. (Abby Ohlheiser for The Washington Post)

The City Council has taken the reigns on leading the city, due to the oiler vacuum left behind by Mayor de Blasio’s complete lack of projected strength as the leader of the city. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

11 days before volunteers participated in an annual count of the homeless sleeping on the city’s streets, the mayor’s office attempted to misrepresent the actual number by attempting to find more beds for the homeless. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio is walking away from his own “expert” panel’s central recommendation for fixing the BQE because he believes the disproven fallacy that eliminating lanes of traffic adds to congestion, instead of actually reducing it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Here’s how “induced demand” works, a concept known since the 60’s: “on urban commuter expressways, peak-hour traffic congestion rises to meet maximum capacity.” (Benjamin Schneider for CityLab)

The city is going to start enforcing the law when it comes to overweight trucks on the BQE, per the panels suggestion. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

One thing’s for sure, we have less than five years if the city doesn’t do something about the BQE. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The governor has been attempting to avoid political controversy sticking to him by assigning the most difficult problems to commissions and panels. Think back his sudden swooping in to present the L train shutdown. He assigned the problem to a panel who gave the alternative. Here are his current panels: Medicaid Redesign, Traffic Mobility, Climate Action, Digital Marketplace Worker Classification, and Public Campaign Finance. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

The story of how Governor Cuomo’s oversized ego made it impossible for Andy Byford to stay on a President of New York City Transit Authority. (Jim Dwyer for NY Times)

If you enjoy yelling at the MTA, they’ve added more pubic feedback meetings about their redesigned bus network in Queens. (Bill Parry for QNS)

After a horrifying case of animal abuse was uncovered at a Manhattan pet store, a bill in the state legislature would ban the sale of dogs, cats, and rabbits in pet stores across the state is gaining support. The bill would ban the sale from stores, but not from breeders. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

The city’s first suspected case of coronavirus is being investigated at NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue. This is no reason to panic. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A second and third case of coronavirus are already being investigated. Still no reason to panic. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

While coronavirus is on your mind, you should be worrying about the flu. his year we face a double-trouble scenario where it’s possible to get sick more than once during flu season. Two strains are hitting, so your chances of getting sick have doubled. The death toll from the flu this season is already at 10,000. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to eat sushi omakase for under $125. (Lorelei Yang for Eater)

“When you build high, folks will jump” were seven words included in an ArchDaily review of Vessel. Unfortunately on Saturday night, those words were proved true when a 19-year-old man committed suicide by jumping from the structure. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The city’s had a goal of planting 20,000 new trees every year, but has only managed to plant less than 1/3 of that lately. The Department of Parks and Recreation points to the rising costs of planting and maintaining trees. (Len Maniace for amNewYork Metro)

Hiram Monserrate was expelled from the state’s senate in 2009 for committing domestic assault in a horrifying story. In 2012 he plead guilty for illegally using money from a nonprofit he controlled to support a run for senate and has only paid back $8,400 of $79,000 in restitution for stealing public funds. He’s trying to make a political comeback. (Vivian Wang for NY Times)

Would you live in Bay Ridge? Localize lays out a case with eight reasons to move to Bay Ridge. (Localize Labs)

The story of Taste of Persia leaving Pizza Paradise just took a turn. Saeed Pourkay, chef and owner of Taste of Persia is accusing that Pizza Paradise stole his recipes shortly after his restaurant was forced out of Pizza Paradise. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A major overhaul to the city’s property taxes could fundamentally shift the tax burden from low- and moderate-income homeowners to wealthy neighborhoods. A panel has been at work on the proposal since 2018, but mayors have attempted to tackle the subject for over a quarter century. The plan wouldn’t result in higher tax revenues. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons, Matthew Haag and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

The mayor is optimistic about getting the reforms done. “This is something I believe can and will be done during my administration.” (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams says if elected to be mayor, he would regularly carry a gun. (NY1)

What’s the history behind New York’s nickname “Gotham?” (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A truck driver killed a Bushwick cyclist while making an illegal U-turn in Williamsburg on Jan. 30, marking the first cyclist death of 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s a video showing how Pedro Lopez was killed, and it is shocking. Despite killing Lopez, the driver of the truck was not issued a ticket and the NYPD’s comment about it was there was “no criminality suspected.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Department of Environmental Protection has reversed course and will fill the Jerome Park Reservoir basin in the Bronx. Previously the plan was to keep the basin empty. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Friday night’s “FTP” protests called for free public transit, an end to the harassment of the homeless, vendors and musicians in the subways, and full accessibility for people of all physical abilities throughout the transit system. The protest gathered at Grand Central Terminal at 5pm to maximally disrupt the evening commute and spread out from there. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

The Meatball Shop’s Lower East Side flagship location will be closing this weekend. (Bowery Boogie)

The best restaurants in Sunset Park. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for January 31, 2020 – The Weekend “Three Story Tall Taco Ball in Midtown” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Breaking car culture on the BQE, Decolonize This Place wants to “f**k s**t up” on the subways, a Dolly Parton cover band reviews a Dolly Parton bar and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 44˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 45˚

Decolonize This Place plans to “fuck shit up” on the subways today. The group declared the 31st as a day of protest to send the message that New York will not tolerate the surge of police on the subways. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

100 bus stations in 18 neighborhoods across the city will sport a photo exhibition from artist Farah Al Qasimi called Back and Forth Disco, which celebrates “individuality and the aesthetic choices that make spaces and surroundings uniquely personal.” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

De Blasio’s panel focused on what to do with the crumbling BQE has a recommendation: Preserve the Brooklyn Promenade and close one lane in either direction, limiting the amount of traffic that can be on the road and encourage diversions. The recommendations are for the remaining time the BQE stands, but it will have to be replaced at some point in the future. If the city wants to break car culture, things have to get worse for drivers before it gets better for everyone. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Is Midtown ready for a three story Taco Bell Cantina? (Nicholas Rizzi for Commercial Observer)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has a plan for universal affordable housing. The mayoral hopeful’s plan would require a quarter of new apartments in any development with more than 10 apartments be set aside for tenants earning 60% of the area median income or $58,000 a year for a family of three. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

The most “affordable” neighborhood in Manhattan is Washington Heights, where you’ll only pay $652 per square foot. (emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Four Queens borough president candidates have been eliminated from the ballot, leaving Consta Constantinides, Elizabeth Crowler, Jim Quinn, and Dao Yin for March 24. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Nearly 2,000 kids might not be able to find a kindergarten to meet their needs this spring, amid a shortage of space in special education pre-K classrooms, according to a new study released Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Dermot Shea is the city’s first NYPD commissioner registered with a political party. in over 30 years. Does the Republican Shea support the president’s anti-immigration policies? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The Times Square Valentine Heart Design Competition winner was unveiled on Thursday. Heart Squared is a 125 mirror installation arranged in the shape of a heart and is in Father Duffy Square in Times Square. Check it out the next time someone tricks you into going there. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn Eagle fired four employees, their editor-in-chief Ned Berke, managing editor Sara Bosworth, reporter Meaghan McGoldrick, and growth manager Cambria Roth, in what seems to be a combination of a failed attempt to secure investment and the publisher of the company’s issues with “woke journalism.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The First National City Bank building, on the corner of Canal and Broadway, will become Mercato Fabbrica, a 35,000-square-foot Italian-style food hall, with groceries, a tea parlor, coffee house, nano-brewery, boutique, rooftop terrace, and a “culinary social club with cowering lounge”. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Using the Tessa Majors murder as a backdrop, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is calling for every school in the city to have a full-time social worker. The three suspects in the case are all teenage boys who were attending P.S. 180 in Manhattan. P.S. 180 has 500 students and until recently had only been served by a single part-time social worker. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Who better to review a Dolly Parton-themed bar than Doll Parts, a Dolly Parton cover band. (Maggie Robinson Katz and Julie Sirna-Frest for Brooklyn Paper)

In a “just when you thought it couldn’t get worse” scenario, a Brooklyn mother’s day went from “no good” to “very bad” very quickly. One of her children got sick and puked on a bus, which was taken out of service. On the street, another passenger on the bus pulled a knife and slashed her face before running off. The mother went to Brookdale Hospital for the slash. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say hello to the four new flavors at Van Leeuwen: marionberry cheesecake, Irish cream, ginger lemon poppy seed crumble, and churros & fudge. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Video: Maybe We Woke Up: The Saving of Neir’s Tavern, a six minute documentary. (Christopher Ming Ryan and Evan Fairbanks)

The NYPD is sending high ranking officers to talk to the public to scare monger against the state’s new bail reforms. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

Shakespeare in the Park announced its shows in its 2020 season: Richard II and As You Like It (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

When contemplating a cab vs a Lyft/Uber, you weight the options. The inconvenience but lower price of a cab vs the convenience and potential surge pricing of a Lyft/Uber. Throw that out the window, because a panel is set to recommend surge pricing for taxis. (NY Times)

The best meals for around $20 on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Murat for today’s featured photo!