The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 17, 2019 – The “At This Point, Why Not Wait for Christmas?” Edition

CitiBike’s expansion, the best happy hours, the most expensive neighborhood, the government will not bring a case against Daniel Pantaleo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

New York City had a monorail, if only for a moment. Visitors to the 1964 World’s Fair were able to see the grounds in a 4000 foot looped monorail that was disassembled when the fair closed. Support pylons can still be seen in the ground in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. (Untapped Cities)

Who are Jeff Bezos’s new neighbors? Let’s find out. There’s a list at the end of the article if you want to skip down to it. (The Real Deal)

We have a winner, a Christmas tree being thrown out on July 16. (EV Grieve)

48 people were arrested while blocking traffic at 5th Ave and 42nd on Tuesday while protesting President Trump’s continued threat of ICE raids. (amNY)

Just finished anoter re-watch of Seinfeld and looking for a meal? If you want that classic diner experience, Queens is your borough. (QNS)

If you’ve wanted to take an up-close look at one of Tom Fruin’s Kolonihavehus glass mosaic water towers that are dotted around the city, one is on display inside The Shops at Hudson Yards. (Untapped Cities)

ConEd is celebrating turning the power back on in Manhattan with a victory tour of telling the public “sometimes blackouts happen in heatwaves.” Very reassuring. (6sqft)

The federal government will not bring charges for Daniel Pantaleo over the death of Eric Garner. NYPD Commissioner is the arbiter of Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial, which the police administrative judge has not yet rendered a verdict. “The D.O.J. has failed us,” -Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr (NY Times)

The Department of Transportation’s “Safer Cycling” report in 2017 identified eight priority zones with insufficient bike infrastructure and deadly crashes. Since these areas were identified, the number of injuries in the priority zones have risen by 6.5%. (Streetsblog)

The driver of a box truck hit a cyclist in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue. The cyclist was either unconscious or unresponsive before being taken to Methodist hospital. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into why drivers and pedestrians seem to hate bicyclists. (Gothamist)

CitiBike officially unveiled their plans for expansion into the Bronx Ridgewood, Upper Manhattan, and deeper into Brooklyn. It’ll be a while for some neighborhoods with the expansion scheduled through 2023. (6sqft)

We The Commuters is celebrating Bike Week with a list of biking clubs across the city where the intimidation factor is low and the “we won’t leave you behind” factor is high. (Gothamist)

The play-on-words named Dig Inn has decided to change its name to questionable and no longer punny Dig. They argue “Dig has become more than a restaurant,” to which I argue “restaurants have table service.” (@diginn on Medium)

What to do in a power outage. These are practical tips, this isn’t a guide to entertain yourself. (StreetEasy)

Levain Bakery added a “secret” ice cream sandwich menu item, so if you’re looking to impress your friends who aren’t subscribers to The Briefly, this is your moment. (Gothamist)

A list of the dates where the L train is shut down overnights at ten stations throughout Brooklyn in July, August, September, October, and January. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for six weekends of partial to non-service as switches are replaced. (Curbed)

“My mother at Lincoln Towers at 69th and West End has no power also.” The New York Times published their Slack transcripts from the night of the blackout, because why not? (NY Times)

A farewell to Dean & Deluca. (Grub Street)

Giselle Burgess, the founder of the first troop designed for homeless girls in NYC Girl Scout Troop 6000, was elected to the board of directors of The Child Center of NY. (QNS)

As expected, two real estate trade groups have brought a constitutional challenge against the state’s rent reforms. Historically the Supreme Court has uphelf rent regulations. (NY Times)

Tribeca remains #1 in the city when it comes to home prices, with the median sale price in Q2 of 2019 being $4.34 million. The only neighborhood that comes close is Hudson Yards with $3.86 million. (6sqft)

Williamsburg has the more cases of the measles than any other neighborhood, but the list is 9 neighborhoods long and the total measles count rose by 1 in July to 623. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Tips for eating out in NYC with food allergies. (amNY)

The city’s “Nostalgia Ride” which goes from 96th St to Coney Island along the Q line in a 1917 BMT train will happen this Saturday. Be patient, the ride takes about two hours. (amNY)

Waitress will close on Broadway in January of 2020. (NY Times)

How much trash is on our beaches? Well, Parley for Oceans, the Department of Sanitations official non-profit group, with 170 volunteers picked up 1,200 pounds of trash from Rockaway Beach in two hours. (Gothamist)

The top happy hours in 25 neighborhoods. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for May 15, 2019 – The “Carlos Danger Is At Large” Edition

A Queens city councilmember admits to sexual harassment and keeps his job, answering Broadway’s mysteries, Pride by the numbers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to Trump Tower, one of NYC’s least desirable luxury buildings. (Bloomberg)

The expanded Statue of Liberty museum is opening on Thursday featuring the original torch and other artifacts and exhibits highlighting the statue, island, and history. Only 20% of the people who step foot on the island visit the current museum. (amNY)

Amnesty International U.S.A. was set to sign a new lease at 88 Pine St until the new landlord said no. That landlord? The Chinese Government. (The Real Deal)

NYC Pride by the numbers on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots. (amNY)

Carlos Danger is at large after serving 18-months in prison for sexting with a minor. (NY Times)

Uh oh. This is the start of talk of a subway strike. (NY Times)

Six historic LGBTQ sites may become NYC landmarks. (6sqft)

The trial of NYPD’s Daniel Pantaleo, accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal choke, continued with Pantaleo’s lawyer blaming Eric Garner’s death on Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

Can a chef who’s earned a two-star Michelin rating change school lunches for the better? (NY Times)

A wine and artisanal food festival at Industry City was interrupted by anti-rezoning protest, specifically aimed at the commercialization of the industrial sector. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci is bringing his masterpiece St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Time Out)

Council Member Barry Grodenchik has resigned as chair of the Committee on Parks and Recreation after admitting to paying improper attention to a Council staff member, including blowing a kiss to her across a table at a meeting. Gross. (Politico)

Don’t worry, he is “deeply sorry,” and he will not be losing his job on the City Council. (Gothamist)

There was a worry that if New Jersey passed marijuana legalization that New York would have to follow quickly. New Jersey legalized electric bikes and scooters, maybe this will be the kick in the pants that New York finally needs? (Streetsblog)

Photos from inside the Whitney’s Biennial. If you make your way to the Whitney, expect protests against board member Warren Kanders, who has ties to a manufacturer of tear gas canisters used against asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border. (Gothamist)

Rockaway Beach will be fully open this summer after a $10.7 million renovation to prevent catastrophic erosion. 348,000 cubic yards of sand were added to the beach. (Curbed)

Meet Liz Thomas, the professional long-distance hiker who is about to set out on a 175-mile, 100+ park, five borough hike across NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve seen groups of people camping near Central Park for a week, it’s not a protest or a performance art piece or anything like that. BTS is coming to Summerstage. (Gothamist)

The best parks for outdoor grilling. (amNY)

Are Summer Fridays a New York thing, or does it exist everywhere? (StreetEasy)

Today is the first hearing for the proposed fur ban, which pits activists against the fur industry. If New York enacts the ban, it would be following in the footsteps of San Francisco and Los Angeles. (amNY)

Video: A tour of the most expensive neighborhood in New York City. Take a guess on what you think it is before clicking. (Eric Conover)

Congrats! NYC is one of the worst places in the country to try and start a career. (Patch)

Congratulations to City Councilmember-elect Farah Louis on her victory in the special election to fill the vacant 45th City Council district seat. Louis received 41.81% of the vote, which was enough to win. (Kings County Politics)

Answers to the six biggest questions asked on Broadway each night. (NY Times)

The Wednesday Walk: “A Saturday afternoon circuit for some fatty food, but also when you want to seem a little cultured” (GoRoam)

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