The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for October 17, 2019 – The “Did 14th St Cause the Apocalypse?” Edition

A Halloween guide for dog lovers, New York can get around presidential pardons, 100 community gardens may close, the best Harlem restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

If you want to see dogs in Halloween costumes, this is your guide. (Gothamist)

There are more two-bedroom apartments available in Brooklyn than Manhattan. (StreetEasy)

Whoever is setting the Lower East Side Park port-a-potties on fire, stop it. (Patch)

The data is in and the 14th St busway did not cause the apocalypse. There was barely any change to the traffic on the surrounding streets. The study was conducted by the same people that found that the new Kosciuszko Bridge actually made traffic worse than before it was replaced. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD’s Hyun Kim, 25, was charged Saturday with two counts of menacing after pointing his gun at waitresses at a bar in Queens. (Gothamist)

A look inside the new TWA Hotel. (Forgotten New York)

Finally, a reason to go to Times Square! Check out the They Live-inspired billboard from Mitch “The World’s Best Artist” O’Connell at 7th Ave and 48th St. (Boing Boing)

With Mother Cabrini in the news so much, take a tour down Cabrini Blvd in Washington Heights. It’s not arbitrarily named, it’s where she was interred for many years. (Forgotten New York)

If you’re into meta museum exhibits, the Museum of the City of New York’s Cultivating Culture is for you, focusing on 34 museums. Here are ten treasures from the exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

It didn’t take long, but the mystery of how a man ended up dead under a manhole seems to have been solved. On September 30, the man walked through multiple safety barriers and fell in and workers closed it up two hours later, not knowing he was down there. (Gothamist)

The former Caffe Cino location is now NYC’s newest landmark. It’s considered to be the home of Off Off Broadway. It’s currently home to the bar The Drunken Monkey. It was one of the six LGBTQ landmarks considered this week from the NYC Landmarks Commission. (Untapped Cities)

Apple and Facebook are in a new competition, but this time it’s over office space in the post office building on 8th Ave. (The Real Deal)

Lose a chainsaw? They’ve got it for you at the Penn Station lost and found. (Gothamist)

Opinion: In support of ranked-choice voting. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (The Infatuation)

Video: See the newest residents of the Bronx Zoo, a trio of dholes, which are adorable and endangered wild dogs named Roan, Apollo, and Kito. (Viewing NYC)

Audio: A real look at gentrification, using Bed-Stuy’s recent neighborhood changes as a backdrop. (Brooklyn Based)

NYPD sergeant Linhong Li is the 10th member of the NYPD to commit suicide in 2019. He died of a gunshot to the head in his home in Fresh Meadows. Four members died by suicide in 2018. (Gothamist)

The land use committee approved the Rikers replacement jails, clearing the way for a full City Council vote today. (Politico)

Does NYC’s affordable housing program go far enough? (Curbed)

Representatives Eliot Engel, Jerry Nadler, Carolyn Maloney, and Yvette Clarke are all subject of AOC-style challenges for their seats in 2020. (Politico)

There are 100 community gardens that are in danger of closing because of the Parks Department’s new GreenThumb policies that it is mandating gardens sign in order to remain open. Volunteer organizations that run the refusing gardens say the rules are onerous and make it unviable to run the spaces. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A new law in New York will allow the state to bring charges against anyone who receives a presidential pardon for related crimes, citing the Supreme Court’s decision that double jeopardy does not apply to the states’ ability to bring charges that were also tried federally. (Politico)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Village Halloween Parade. (curbed)

27 hit Harlem restaurants to try. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 16, 2019 – The “JUUL Miss Me When I’m Gone” Edition

Late-night subway disruptions, the MTA’s ballooning budget, the weekly restaurant closures, Rudy Giuliani’s divorce gets messy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

It’s a short list of subways that will be disrupted late nights this week. Even still, if you’re on the 1, 4, A, E, or R trains, you’ll want to check before you make late-night plans. (Subway Weekender)

It’s possible that the Cuomo-Byford feud may be softening. (Politico)

The city will allow bicyclists to ride past the United Nations during the General Assembly, a departure from previous years. It still won’t be easy. Each bicyclist will have to pass a security checkpoint before proceeding. (Streetsblog)

The governor announced the state will ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes with an emergency ruling. (Politico)

The city will be showing off some early design concepts for the Sunnyside Yards. (Sunnyside Post)

The city is calling its renovation of Fort Greene “routine work” to avoid doing a full environmental review. The Sierra Club is leading a lawsuit against the city for the classification and lack of review. (Patch)

The photos of Battery Park as a wheat field are weird. In 1982 there were two acres of wheat planted as an art installation which also yielded a thousand pounds of wheat. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA was headed for a $392 million budget gap in 2020, but that was before the MTA decided to hire 500 additional police officers. (Politico)

The MTA’s on-time performance rate hit 84% last month from 68% the previous August. The future of the MTA is all in the 2020-2024 capital plan, which hasn’t been made public and will be voted on on October 1. (6sqft)

Where to have a last-minute fancy dinner. (The Infatuation)

“I’m sad to know that the hero of 9/11 has become a liar.” Is anyone surprised that Rudy Giuliani’s divorce is a huge mess? (Splinter)

Luxury apartments are changing the city’s skyline, but they aren’t selling. 25% of the luxury apartments built since 2013 have never been sold. (Gothamist)

Speaking of luxury apartments, there will be 700 new luxury apartments will be built in Dumbo as part of a development on a three-acre parking lot. (NY Times)

A class-action lawsuit over a lack of wine coolers in luxury apartments in Hudson Square. (Patch)

Here are this week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. No one hit over 100 points, but the Eataly kiosks in Flatiron had the highest violation score. (Patch)

The mayor is fighting back against allegations that his sudden embrace of restricting hotel development in the city has something to do with a presidential endorsement from the Hotel Trades Council union. (Politico)

Would you love to brunch at the new TWA Hotel but don’t want to travel like a peasant to get there? Well, now you can take a private helicopter to brunch from lower Manhattan. (Time Out)

After a few weeks of confusion, the state has clarified that landlords and brokers are both going to be held to the new $20 application fee limit. Before the ruling, agents were charging high fees because a landlord wasn’t allowed to. (Gothamist)

A man with a sword was arrested at the observation deck of the Empire State Building. (amNY)

It’s the kind of trash talk you need to see to believe. (@edenbrower)

Whoops, an NYPD school safety officer was arrested for possession of three pounds of marijuana. (SI Live)

Are you the person who bought a $10 million lotto ticket in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Sometimes trash is old food and mile-long CVS receipts. Sometimes it’s 20,000 slides of fashion shows from the 1980s. (Jezebel)

22 places for a stellar meal in Soho. (Eater)