The Briefly for December 1-3, 2020 – The “New York City’s Least Wanted” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The city’s new test time wait “tool,” AOC for mayor?, the plan to reopen schools, a food gift guide, Times Square is sad, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 53˚
Possible drizzle in the morning.

The city launched a Covid-19 test wait time tool for Health + Hospitals test sites. Don’t get too excited. It’s a PDF that updates every 15 minutes, but as of writing this, it was still showing yesterday’s wait times. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

400 idiots were found in a party in Manhattan at 3 am on Saturday by the city’s Sherrif, who broke up the party. (Mihir Zaveri for NY Times)

The Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home’s funeral director’s license was revoked. This is after dozens of decomposing bodies were found in trucks outside of the funeral home at the height of the pandemic. (Kimiko de Freytas-Tamura for NY Times)

The MTA was scheduled to receive the first of its new open gangway design cars this year, which won’t be happening due to a supply-chain slowdown. The first of the new cars are expected sometime next year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Governor Cuomo laid out five strategies to prevent overwhelming the state’s hospitalization system. Hospital capacity, testing, keeping as many schools open as possible, limiting small gatherings, and getting a vaccination program ready. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

New York’s least wanted. Accent: Fake Posh. Eyes: Dead Behind. Married to Slenderman? Yes. (@TGLNYC on Instagram)

Being envious of a realistic apartment in a video game may be something that is uniquely New York. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

6sqft selects food gifts from 21 NYC restaurants and shops. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

I love the idea of secret tunnels and passageways existing throughout the city, like the abandoned passageway between the Hotel Roosevelt and Grand Central Terminal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Roberta’s Pizza is closed, as a number of workers contracted COVID-19. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

What’s one way to make viewing the Rockefeller Christmas tree worse during a global pandemic? How about a bunch of rules and needing tickets to see it? I appreciate the idea, but this underscores just how much this year is the worst. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

InThe Coney Island Polar Bear Club has canceled the January 1st swim. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

In better news, SantaCon is also canceled. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Laying out the unlikely case for AOC for mayor in 2021. (Amba Guerguerian for The Indypendent)

Andrew Yang is still considering a run at the mayorship. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Arlene’s Grocery may be forced to close on February 1. They’re looking to raise $80,000 on goFundMe to stay open. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

“They’re not going to enforce their own laws. Obviously, we’re not seeing the enforcement around precincts, especially some of mine, where police vehicles are parked everywhere, blocking crosswalks.” The City Council is fed up with the NYPD treating sidewalks like their own personal parking lot. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Middle and high school buildings across the city will not reopen for in-person learning until 2021 with no specific date announced. Elementary and younger will reopen on December 3 and the city will lose the 3% threshold that got us into this mess in the first place. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Also in the “not for a while” category is congestion pricing, which the MTA now says may not be happening until 2023. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Former UCB employees launched The Squirrel Comedy Theater with an aim towards inclusivity after UCB’s closure in April. Right now you can find them streaming on Wednesday and Thursday nights on Twitch. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The NY Times has discovered that if Times Square is empty, it’s pretty depressing. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

An ode to New York City’s elevated trains. (Joy Masoff for Untapped New York)

A look at why eviction filings are up, despite the eviction moratorium. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

The chief executive of the New York Road Runners, the nonprofit behind the NYC Marathon, will step down in the face of allegations that he fostered a toxic and racist work culture. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A manhole cover of a mysterious origin. The city’s history still has questions we can’t answer. (Ephemeral New York)

Updated: The ultimate Manhattan delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of Harlem at dawn!

The Briefly for April 22, 2020 – The “Someone Has to Be the Bad Roommate, Is It You?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo meets with Trump, City Council will force the mayor’s hand with opening up streets, the best Chinese takeout options, and more

Today – Low: 39˚ High: 50˚
Clear throughout the day.

Looking back to the first-ever subway, which went one block from Murray St to Warren St and was powered by compressed air. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Looking forward to the reopening of the city, Mayor de Blasio says temperature checks will likely be required to get things moving again. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Which roommate is the bad roommate? Check the list of dos and don’ts. Is it you? (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio gets driven from the Upper East Side to Prospect Park to take a walk every day, yet he can’t see the value of giving public space like streets to pedestrians and cyclists when car traffic has been reduced 60%. On Earth Day, the City Council is ready to introduce a bill that will force his hand and give 75 miles of streets back to the people. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The City Council will introduce a COVID-19 relief package on Wednesday that extends the eviction moratorium for those affected by the coronavirus crisis until April 2021. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sometimes you just want to read a list. 10 famous people that lived in the Bronx. (Alex Mitchell for amNewyork Metro)

Williamsburg is the home of White Fox Scooters, the city’s first docked electric scooter sharing service. It works like CitiBike, where you’ll have to return the scooters to a dock, instead of leaving them wherever. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Do you remember when grocery shopping was fun? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

When this is all over, whenever that will be, the city will hold a ticker-tape parade for our healthcare workers and first responders. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

10 of the most luxurious bathrooms for sale right now. The rest of the apartments are for sale too. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The city’s Hasidic communities are some of the hardest hit by COVID-19, for a series of reasons that made it the perfect place for the virus to spread, including a high poverty rate, religious leaders who were slow to act, a distrust of authority, and a refusal to shut down and socially distance like the rest of the city. (Liam Stack for NY Times)

The non-profit Spaceworks in Gowanus will be shutting down in mid-June, forcing 28 artists to vacate their spaces mid-outbreak. Gowanus has been losing art spaces as a high rate as the neighborhood slowly turns over to more and more residential buildings. The artists are protected under Governor Cuomo’s ban on evictions, but that is set to run out on June 20, unless renewed. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The UCB Theatre in Hell’s Kitchen and UCB Training Center on 8th Avenue will both permanently close. UCB will push forward once the city reopens with shows and classes in different venues throughout the city. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The lawn at Bryant Park has been mowed in the shape of a heart in tribute to the city’s first responders and essential workers. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Can you move during the COVID-19 epidemic? Yes, here’s how. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

A 420 part on 4/20 busted by the NYPD at 4:20. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The de Blasio administration has missed its own deadline for transferring roughly 2,500 homeless people to hotel rooms to help limit the spread of COVID-19. Good to know that as everything seems to be changing around us, we can rely on the de Blasio administration to fall short of their own self-imposed deadlines. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Tuesday’s meeting between Governor Cuomo and President Trump was described as civil and productive, as the Governor said the city no longer needs the USNS Comfort but does need tens of thousands of COVID-19 tests. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where to order take out and delivery in Sunset Park. (Ellie Plass for BKLYNER)

The best NYC street art inspired by our surreal times. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

For Wonderville, a bar in Bushwick displaying and celebrating locally-made arcade games, moving events into the world of Minecraft makes perfect sense. (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

24 of the top Chinese restaurants still open. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Elizabeth for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 11, 2019 – The “Long On Promises, Short On Details” Edition

A closer look at the State of the City, “Rhode Island-style” pizza, election reform, UCB East is closing, a “bike mayor” for the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s scheduled subway service changes: The 5 is gonna be super slow, the 7, J and M trains are out between Queens and Manhattan, and that’s just the start of it. (6sqft)


Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019 State of the City address highlights:

Watch the 2019 State of the City address given by Mayor Bill de Blasio

Five takeaways from the State of the City. (NY Times)

“Plenty of money in the city. It’s just in the wrong hands!” The mayor preached distribution of wealth, came up short on the details. (NY Times)

The speech was focused on equality, workers and tenants’ rights, and income inequality, to go “bigger, bolder, and aim higher.” (Politico)

The city’s free 3-K program will expand to districts 6, 8, 9, 19 and 32. (Bklyner)

Bus speeds should increase 25% by the end of 2020 from 7.44 to 9.03 mph. Some tactics will be adding between 10 and 15 miles of dedicated lanes, revamp five miles, and installing barriers to protect bus lanes from drivers. The NYPD will also add a team of tow truck drivers dedicated to clearing bus lanes. (amNY)

New and modified ferry routes: Staten Island will be connected to Battery Park and W 39th Street and a new Coney Island line will stop at Bay Ridge on its way to Wall Street. The Soundview, South Brooklyn and Astoria routes will be expanded. (Curbed)

The mayor created the Office of Tenant Protection, whose details were long on promises and short on details. The office will seize the buildings of the city’s “worst landlords,” which is an interesting phrase considering the worst landlord in the city was recently declared to be… the city. (The Real Deal & Curbed)

Free eyeglasses will be provided to kindergarteners or first graders need them starting next school year in a partnership with Warby Parker. (Chalkbeat)

While the mayor touted successes on old pledges like the styrofoam ban and a plan to divest the city’s pensions from fossil fuels, there was no plans for new green initiatives. (Politico)

Also missing? The NYCHA crisis. (Gotham Gazette)


Albany is looking to make some sense out of our state’s elections, limiting donations from LLCs, create early voting, combining election days, voting by affidavit, and pre-registering to vote at the age of 16. (Politico)

The modernist treasures of Queens. (Curbed)

A Bike Mayor? Transportation Alternatives has a petition looking to add the position to champion cycling across city agencies. Is it any more odd than a “Night Mayor?” (Streetsblog)

The average jail population in the city is at its lowest since 1980. (Daily News)

UCB will close their East Village theater on February 9 amid financial problems. Some shows will be moved to SubCulture. (Vulture)

LIRR will begin service to Grand Central Terminal by the end of 2022. (6sqft)

The secrets of the St. Marks historic district. (6sqft)

The most dangerous neighborhood to walk in Queens? Flushing. (Streetsblog)

Okay, what the hell is “Rhode Island-style” pizza? (Bedford + Bowery)

A teacher who was fired for allegedly forcing black students to lie on the floor while she stepped on their backs is planning on suing the city for one billion dollars. (NY Post)

The 15 most anticipated restaurant openings this winter. (Eater)

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