The Briefly for June 14, 2019 – The “A Plan To Save Us All From the Sea” Edition

The religious exemption for vaccines is ending, a ball-pit bar is coming to Brooklyn, the weekend subway service changes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This is the end of the religious exemption from vaccines in New York state. The legislature agreed on a bill and the governor has said he would sign it to prevent future public health crises similar to the current measles outbreak. (NY Times)

It’s the weekend, so usual “check the subways before you go anywhere” rules apply. (Subway Weekender)

Get to know your Queens District Attorney candidates. (Queens Crap)

Jon Stewart, New York’s collective voice, had a heck of a week. It opened with shaming Congress, which resulted in moving the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund moving forward, and ended with an extremely personal gift from some grateful firefighters. (Gothamist)

The United States Army Corps of Engineers released a series of plans to save New York from when the sea rises up to eat us. Each of the proposals will cost billions of dollars and would dramatically change the city’s coastline. A plan will be selected either later this year or early next year. The plans range from a 25-year construction that would cost over $100 billion to nine years and cost about $15 billion. (Curbed)

The park at Essex Crossing in the Lower East Side is now open. (6sqft)

A 4-alarm fire broke out in Midwood that injured twelve and spread through three houses and was caught on fire. Three firefighters were among the twelve. (Gothamist)

Sometimes justice moves slowly. Elizabeth Lederer, the lead prosecutor in the Central Park Five case, will not return as a lecturer at Columbia Law School after the release of Netflix’s “When They See Us.” (amNY)

Here are the important points of info you need to know about the new rent reform package. (Gothamist)

There’s more to Coney Island than Nathan’s and Totonno’s. 9 places to eat in Coney Island, but honestly, all you need to know is Dona Zita. (Eater)

The 11234 zip code, where you can find Bergen Beach, Mill Basin and Flatlands, has more baby boomers than any other zipcode in the United States. The city has 14 of the top 20 zip codes for boomers, with the city holding the top four spots. (Patch)

The old Coffee Shop in Union Square is going to become a Chase Bank. (Gothamist)

There’s an office tower in Manhattan unfortunately named “Penn15.” (The Real Deal)

Where to eat a last minute dinner in the East Village. (The Infatuation)

The people in the city’s homeless shelters are treated like numbers and the employees of the Department of Homeless Services appears to be abusing “emergency” transfers to move people around for seemingly no reason. (NY Times)

Is El Museo del Barrio turning its back on the local Latinx community? The Mirror Manifesto, an open letter signed by artists, was read while protestors occupied the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. (Gothamist)

Starting July 1, the NYPD will take a different tact with people who are homeless on the subway and commit minor infractions. Instead of a summons, they will be sent to a detox facility, shelter, or to get other kinds of help as needed. The purpose of the pilot program is to divert people away from the court system and to work to minimize subway disruptions, which had tripled in the last few years. (Patch)

Remember the most expensive apartment in the city? The one that came with two tickets two space, a yacht, two full-time servants, and a bevy of other amenities that seemed too good to be true? Turns out it was a fake and a marketing tactic for the building. The listing was a combination of about a dozen different apartments on the 45th floor. (Curbed)

What’s the best time of year to look for an apartment in the city? StreetEasy broke it down neighborhood by neighborhood, and we’re heading into the worst time of year for most areas. (Curbed)

It might not be surprising that the neighborhoods with the most excessive airplane noise are in Queens, with Brookville, Howard Beach, and Flushing topping the list. (Localize.Labs)

If you’ve fallen in love with the MTA’s new rainbow transit heart, you can find it on some of the city’s 1 trains and on MetroCards. Five subway trains are sporting the MTA Pride logo and you can get special edition World Pride MetroCards at a few select subway stations. (Gothamist)

The unofficial MTA Pride Train signs are back across the city. (amNY)

Turns out dads can be stay-at-home parents too! Who knew? (amNY)

There’s coffee and then there’s coffee. Sawada, a Tokyo-style cafe, is “one of the most genuinely inspired additions to the New York coffee scene in some time.” (Eater)

The Barclays Center announced a free summer concert series featuring Andy Suzuki & The Method, Nappy Nina and Dj Donwill, DJ Mick, and more. (The Brooklyn Reader)

An analysis from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs indicates that the president’s immigration policies are having a chilling effect on immigrants using SNAP benefits. The rate of non-citizens dropping out of the program is four times higher than citizens dropping out. (NY Times)

Let’s ask the scary questions. How safe is the elevator in your building? (the Real Deal)

Let’s all say farewell to the small superheroes of NYC, with the last season of Jessica Jones closing out The Defenders’ run on Netflix. Daredevil, Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher, and Jessica Jones were New York City’s heroes and the fun game of where was that filmed?” will have to be reserved for re-watches. (amNY)

They don’t make subway stations like they used to. This time it was Atlantic Terminal that saw a crumbling ceiling along the D, N, R tracks. This incident can be attributed to a non-MTA contractor puncturing the ceiling while taking a soil sample above ground, but add it to the list of inconveniences we all absorb on a daily basis. (amNY)

A ball-pit bar is coming to… no not Bushwick, but very close to it. (Gothamist)

Inside the NYPL’s Stonewall exhibition. (Gothamist)

This week in NIMBY news: The homeless shelter on Billionaire’s Row has cleared a legal hurdle but the neighborhood continues to fight against it. (Curbed)

In more NIMBY news, Community Board 2 has overwhelmingly voted against the mayor’s Rikers Island neighborhood replacement. (Brooklyn Paper)

The Grub Street guide to the summer’s “Can’t-Miss” food festivals. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 6, 2019 – The “Oh No, He’s Actually Going to Run for President, Isn’t He” Edition

The mayor’s Vision Zero program is beginning to fail, the best tacos, Jagged Little Pill plans to bring people to theaters, teens attacked by acid, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes and diversions are minimally awful. (Subway Changes)

A review of Decade of Fire, playing at the Metrograph, which tackles the topic of the burning of the Bronx in the 70s and the organizations that rallied to rebuild when no one else would. (Curbed)

Oh god. He’s actually going to run for President, isn’t he? (Splinter)

How to spend 12 hours on Governors Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jagged Little Pill, which may actually be a bad album, is coming to Broadway on November 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The 10 oldest libraries in the city and their secret histories. (Untapped Cities)

Some teens threw a raucous party in the basement of an NYCHA development. The party ended when someone poured an acid-like liquid onto them from above. (NY Times)

Some people are happy with laundry machines in their building. Others get a million dollar yacht, who Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini, a Hamptons house rental for a summer, and courtside Nets season tickets. Yes, all of those amenities are for one apartment. Welcome to the wildest luxuries for city homes. (Patch)

RIP Lew Fidler. Fidler was a Brooklyn politician, who was a champion for homeless youth in the city council, the environment, and LGBTQ youth. (Politico)

The top twelve brunch spots in the city. Let this serve as a reminder if you want to go anywhere for brunch this weekend. Mother’s Day approaches. (Patch)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants and bars. (amNY)

Scenes from the Union Square cannabis parade and rally from Saturday. (EV Grieve)

It took six years, but the Office of Emergency Management has unveiled lower Manhattan’s solution against a Hurricane Sandy-like storm has arrived. They’ll use… sandbags. Really big sandbags. This took six years. (NY Times)

Margaritaville is a state of mind, but it’s also going to be a resort on the corner of 40th and Seventh Ave. (New York YIMBY)

Katz’s has survived New York since 1888 and New Yorkers have survived Katz’s enormous sandwiches for just as long. I’ll have what she’s having. (Food Insider)

Mark your calendars, November 9 will be Wu-Tang Clan Day, and to celebrate you’ll be able to go to the corner of Targee Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in Staten Island, which is the Wu-Tang Clan District as of this weekend. (The Root)

RIP Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died over the weekend due to Parkinson’s disease complications. Brown was the Queens District Attorney for nearly thirty years and had been on the judiciary since 1973, who had been on a leave of absence from the job since March. (QNS)

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, whose decisions are helping destroy the Amazon and whose racism, homophobia and bigotry tops any racist uncle you’ve got on Facebook, will skip the NYC gala in his honor after it had become clear that New Yorkers will tolerate a lot of punishment, but hosting him is a step too far. (NY Times)

Breathe easy, literally, if you take the L train, the first dust report is in and the concentration of silica dust is well below the benchmarks for dangerous exposure. (NY Times)

BreakfastClub founder and author of BREAKFAST: The Cookbook shares her favorite breakfasts in the city. (Time Out)

Where to have a graduation lunch or dinner. (The Infatuation)

It seems that Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero program has begun to fail. (amNY)

Youfeng Xu was killed crossing Seventh Avenue with the light in Sunset Park, the person behind the wheel of the truck was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian and failure to exercise due care. (Streetsblog)

A three-year-old boy was killed while in a crosswalk in front of a stop sign by a van in Bath Beach last week on a street that the city has known to be dangerous for at least five years. The driver blamed the child’s death on his mother. (Gothamist)

Candy. Where do you get it? Anywhere? Wrong. You get it at Economy Candy. (ABC 7 NY)

Senior citizens outnumber millennials when it comes to renting apartments. (NY Times)

An ice cream parlor for humans and dogs. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Here’s how New York’s proposed voter affiliation deadline change could help Bernie Sanders in the 2020 presidential election. (Gothamist)

35 outstanding tacos in NYC. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 26, 2019 – The “We Never Thought It Happen, But Here We Are” Edition

This weekend begins the L train apocalypse-lite, the Flower District is endangered, a bottle of seltzer stopped the F train cold, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

It’s been three years in the making and three months in the re-making, but this weekend the L train construction finally begins. Getting around is gonna be trying, but if you take the MTA at their word, things are still gonna be terrible if you need to get anywhere along the line. (Gothamist)

Here we go. The L Train Slowdown is finally upon us. You won’t find the L train on any lists of diversions or service changes, it will be running once every 20 minutes. The damage to the subways this weekend is relatively minimal. (Subway Changes)

One thing is certain about the L train slowdown: Like any great compromise, no one is happy. (NY Times)

Pollen is high and AccuWeather suggests if you have allergies that you should stay indoors until October. (Patch)

Mayor de Blasio revealed his budget, which increased by $300 million compared to his preliminary budget and is up $3.4 billion from last year. (Gotham Gazette)

Say farewell to Show World, which survived from 1977 until 2019, the last vestige of Midtown’s porno and prostitution history. (Curbed)

Body parts were found on the F tracks in Gravesend after NYPD officials supposedly removed the victim from the scene on Monday night. The body hasn’ been identified, but the police believe he was a Marine Park resident. (Bklyner)

The 64 people killed on NYC streets in 2019 is up by 49% from last year at the same time. The total amount of crashes are down, but there are still 560 crashes every day. (Streetsblog)

Deep breaths while you hear this. It was a bottle of seltzer, not an emergency brake, that jammed up the F train on Wednesday morning. A bottle of seltzer. (Gothamist)

10 “fun” facts about Central Park. (Untapped Cities)

The Queens Public Library’s One Court Square branch has been paying an annual rent of $1 since 1989 for the first floor of the Citigroup Building in Long Island City, but without Amazon temporarily taking up residence in the building the library is facing the boot when their lease ends on August 31. (The City)

Built that wall, but instead of a megalomaniac’s useless pet-project, it’s a 4.3-mile seawall off the coast of Staten Island to protect against climate change and prevent another Sandy. (Curbed)

Bushwick is heading for a rezoning. Five years after residents complained about the development in the neighborhood the Bushwick Neighborhood Plan calls for creating and preserving affordable homes, parks, historic buildings, and small businesses. (6sqft)

“Every time you say you’re taking out a lane, you’re slowing traffic down. I don’t care what they’re saying, it slows traffic down.” -Community Board 9’s Transportation Chairperson Carolyn Thompson. There’s no arguing with someone who concedes they don’t and won’t believe facts. (Streetsblog)

The NYC version of “Millennials are killing,” is “rising rents are killing.” Their next victim could be Manhattan’s flower district. (NY Times)

Next time you find yourself between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges in Manhattan, think about how that neighborhood was once known as the “Lung Block,” a slum with whose name indicates the high rate of tuberculosis. (6sqft)

New Yorkers love some dog breeds more than others, and a king of the canines has been crowned. (Patch)

After a staff revolt at the Museum of Natural History, a gala honoring Brazilian president and a man who “would be incapable of loving a homosexual son,” Jair Bolsonaro will take place at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square. (Gothamist)

Sweetgreen, makers of salad and a once favorite of former HQ host Scott Rogowsky, has abandoned their cashless policy amid a growing backlash against cashless businesses. (NY Times)

Broadway is car-free from Union Square to Times Square to celebrate Earth Day on Saturday from 9am to 3pm. (Gothamist)

It’s National Pretzel Day, go out on the street and get yourself a classic NYC salty bread snack at the nearest cart. If you’re too good for a street pretzel, here are some snootier options. (Patch)

Is Jersey Governor Phil Murphy playing make-believe or is MTA chairperson Pat Foye out of the loop? Murphy continues to insist that he has a “conceptual understanding” with Governor Cuomo about giving Jersey drivers a congestion pricing discount and Foye says he has “no idea” about what Murphy is talking about. (Politico)

Maybe it’s time we accept that the LinkNYC kiosks are surveillance data-sponges. Police arrested 41-year-old Juan Rodriguez for smashing up dozens of the kiosks. (Gothamist)

The mayor, now known for keeping to a deadline, moved up his estimation of when Rikers Island will close from 2027 to 2026. (Patch)

The worst person in the city has been found. Dominiqua Parrish is accused of throwing a small dog down a trash chute on the seventh floor, believing she was throwing the dog into an incinerator. The dog was saved and was treated for scrapes and bruises by the ASPCA. (QNS)

Over 40 art shows to see right now. (NY Times)

Anna Delvey/Sorokin, the Soho Grifter, was found guilty of most of the charges against her. “Fake it till you make it” said her lawyer. Looks like she might make 15 years in prison. (NY Times)

Support for driver’s licenses for all is growing amongst New York voters. (Gotham Gazette)

10 neighborhoods where rents are going down. (Street Easy)

A good (and long) weekend read: “Her ‘Prince Charming’ Turned Out to Be a Crazed Hit Man on the Run” (NY Times)

Fabián von Hauske Valtierra, the winner of Eater’s best desserts award in 2018, picks his top five desserts in the city. (Eater)

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