The Briefly for May 29, 2020 – The “Our ‘Let Someone Else Figure It Out’ Mayor” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of movie theaters, George Floyd demonstrations, the city’s contact tracing program is a mess, the Tompkins Square hawks grow up, and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 75˚
Possible drizzle overnight.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 79˚

The City Council is pushing a sidewalk-table bill forward that would allow restaurants to apply for permits that would expire on October 31 for outdoor dining. This isn’t a revolutionary idea, even Cincinnatti got it done already. Mayor de Blasio’s complete lack of leadership constantly leaves voids for others to fill. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

When the city starts phase one of reopening, employees of construction jobs, wholesale, manufacturing, agriculture, and retail companies (with safety procedures in place) can go back to work. This will mean somewhere between 200,000 and 400,000 New Yorkers will return to work. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Once New yorkers start to get back to work, how are they getting there? Are the city and state committed to making sure that our public transportation can get those workers to work safely? Our mayor, not known for being proactive, is leaving that decision up to workers and is expecting that the “short-term reality” is that there will be a spike in drivers. No talk about making sure the subways and buses are safe and will be ready no conversation about more opportunities for bicycles, just more cars. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

All the borough presidents have sent a letter to the mayor demanding the city set aside 40 miles of “emergency” bus lanes to get ahead of the expected car congestion. My favorite bit of reporting from this article is “In a press conference on Thursday, the mayor did not allude specifically to the letters, but told reporters that he’s thinking about what to do, but hasn’t done anything yet.” Beautiful. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

So you’ve made sourdough bread, countless cocktails, Shake Shack sauces, Junior’s cheesecakes, and pizza at home during the pandemic. What’s next? Boba Guys have a DIY bubble tea kit. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The same groups that sued the city over its stop-and-frisk policy have sued the city over the NYPD’s Covid-19 social distancing enforcement, calling it “stop and frisk 2.0.” Their original case against the city led to a ruling that declared stop and frisk unconstitutional and racially discriminatory. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

Union Square was full of protestors on Thursday night as a part of nationwide demonstrations sparked by the killing of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police. The demonstrators were met with an aggressive police presence, including an eye witness seeing an officer put a knee on someone’s neck as a part of their arrest. Another rally is planned for 4 pm in Foley Square and at night outside the Barclays Center. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: 10 weeks of a quiet Tribeca. (Tribeca Citizen)

Video: Over 100 years of bread-baking experience at Madonia Bakery in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Williamsburg has a new mural, courtesy of street artist Swoon, on S. Fifth Street. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

When we think back to what was different about the summer of 2020, the return of drive-in movies to the city should be close to the top of the list. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five tech-forward strategies restaurants are testing to ease back into dining in NYC. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Times’ review of the animated “Central Park” on Apple TV+ from the makers of Bob’s Burgers: “Delightful, not depressing.” (James Poniewozik for NY Times)

Video: The stunning sights of empty NYC landmarks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

One of the reasons that I love New York City is that a headline that reads “Gay, democratic-socialist candidate leads Clinton Hill state senate race in fundraising” is not remotely out of the ordinary. One reason Jabari Brisport is out ahead for his senate race is the support of Bernie Sanders’ Our Revolution. (Matt Tracy for Brooklyn Paper)

A feature on artist Sara Erenthal, whose work you’ve likely strewn about the city, and her latest series of work dedicated to the city under lockdown. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

How many of the city’s 1.1 million students are taking classes online? Don’t ask the Department of Education. No, seriously, don’t ask because they don’t know. (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Movie theaters are a part of phase four of New York’s reopening plan, which could be July or later. What will movie theaters look like when they reopen? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

No mask, no service. The governor signed an executive order allowing businesses to refuse service to people for not wearing masks. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Maybe it was partially inspired by this video of Staten Islanders screaming at an unmasked woman to get the hell out of a grocery store until she left. (TMZ)

How do you wear a mask to a bar or restaurant? Good question. Grub Street dives in. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Bobby Catone, known jackass and owner of a tanning salon on Staten Island, opened his tanning salon for a moment on Thursday morning when he was warned by police he could be thrown in jail and have his license revoked if he disobeys and opens his salon again. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Hillary Swank’s former townhouse in the West Village sold for $9.8 million. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

More than 190,000 New Yorkers applied for unemployment last week as national joblessness rates reached 41 million. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city supposedly hired over 1,700 contract tracers, but the reality of the situation is uncertain and the blame is being put on Mayor de Blasio for making NYC Health & Hospitals in charge of the effort instead of the Department of Health. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Museum will become a temporary food pantry starting in June. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

It’s art you’ll need a drone to appreciate. Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada is painting a 20,000 square-foot mural in Flushing Meadows/Corona Park. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Photos: The Tompkins Square hawks are growing up right before our eyes. (Lauge Goggin Photography)

The mayor is flirting with a financial tactic with the intention of digging the city out of its current financial hole that brought the city to the brink of bankruptcy in the 1970s. The idea is to borrow up to $7 billion from the state, which would put the city on the hook for $500 million payments for the next twenty years. The idea was called “fiscally questionable” by the governor. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní, Jeffery C. Mays and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 19, 2020 – The “These Are the Groceries We Refuse to Buy” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The first positive case of COVID-19 is not negative, how to help the elderly, a walk through the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, and more

Today – Low: 49˚ High: 53˚
Rain in the morning and overnight.

The first New York City dweller to test positive for novel coronavirus, the teacher who returned from Italy, no longer has the disease and is expected to make a complete recovery. With a negative test, it may mean that she’s immune to the disease going forward. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

NYC United Against Coronavirus is a resource Google Doc that breaks out neighborhoods, and multiple ways to send and receive help. (NYC United Against Coronavirus)

The Gowanus Dredgers, the people who canoe in the Gowanus Canal, have put together a Google Doc of Gowanus businesses with verified information bout what’s open and what is not along with if a business has a fund for the staff. It’s a very good model for other neighborhoods. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

Four ways to help the city’s elderly people. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Cheddar cheese ramen noodles? A look at the groceries we refuse to buy, even in a crisis. (Claire Leaden for SecretNYC)

Looking at a map that visualizes ridership drops per subway station, you can get a clear picture of who has to go to work in a crisis and who has the luxury to stay home. (Ben Wellington for I Quant NY)

The MTA sustained $87 million in weekly revenue losses, which might not be great news for an agency that was already projecting being half a billion in the hole in a few years. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’re still taking the subway, Riders Alliance has a survey for you to take.

12 things to livestream or virtually explore. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Despite the environment of fear, the empty streets, riderless transit, and patronless bars and restaurants, private construction continues undeterred across the city. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The city is working on drive-thru clinics for coronavirus testing, but there are no concrete plans for people without cars. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

If hospital capacity is not vastly increased, Manhattan’s hospitals would be overwhelmed with coronavirus patients even in the most conservative of possible scenarios. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The USNS Comfort has been dispatched to the New York harbor. The hospital ship contains 1,000 hospital beds, which New York City is in desperate need of right now. (Curtis Brodner for BKLYNER)

Union Square Hospitality Group is laying off about 2,000 employees. Danny Meyer announced that he was forgoing all of his compensation and donating it to a relief fund for all USHG employees. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The volume of the unemployed has saturated the New York Department of Labor’s phone lines and crashed their website multiple times. This is the new system and it’s absolutely real. People whose last name begins with A through F should file on Monday; G through N on Tuesday; and O through Z on Wednesday. If you missed your day, you can file on Thursday or Friday. (Mary Frost for Brookly Eagle)

A live music critic opines about having no live music without self-pity. (Jon Pareles for NY Times)

Amazon has temporarily paused ordering CDs, vinyl, and all other items other than “household staples, medical supplies, or other high demand products” amid the coronavirus pandemic. Once the warehouses have no more, they won’t be restocked until at least April 5. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklyVegan)

As the slow-rolling disaster of the COVID-19 pandemic trickles down, the trash hauling industry is bracing for impact without commercial business, there’s less commercial trash to haul. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Only 50 percent of a business’s workforce can report to work outside their homes for the duration of the coronavirus outbreak, as mandated by Governor Cuomo. Businesses that provide food, medicine, and shipping supplies are exempt. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Central Park remains Manhattan’s oasis during a crisis. (Roger Clark for NY1)

A list of independent bookstores that are delivering cookbooks if you’re looking for recipe inspiration. They’re delivering normal books too. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Department of Justice announced late Tuesday night that it was closing many of the nation’s immigration courts through early April. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

There are two specific populations where a COVID-19 outbreak would become a disaster. The first population is the people in the city’s homeless shelters. A woman was identified as carrying COVID-19 within a shelter and has been hospitalized and the 8 people who shared a room with are all in quarantine. How do you enforce social distancing when you put between 8 and 20 beds in a room? (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The second population is inmates.. An inmate and a Department of Correction officer who works at gate security on Rikers Island have both tested positive for COVID-19. The Board of Correction is recommending finding low-risk inmates to release in order to allow more social distancing to prevent the virus from spreading further (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Liquor deliveries by apps like Drizly or Minibar have skyrocketed since bars closed on Monday. Every day is like New Year’s Eve. (David Gauvey Herbert for Grub Street)

Photos: Personal goodbyes from bars and restaurants across the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden, on its last day being open to the public. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

City Health Department officials have warned Hasidic medical professionals in Crown Heights that as much as 80 percent of the neighborhood may have already been exposed to COVID-19. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Met is projecting a $100 million loss in revenues in the coming months, as well as the likelihood of layoffs. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Following yesterday’s story about the Lyft and Uber Pool, the MTA has finally moved to limit Access-a-Ride vehicles to one passenger. (Michelle Bocanegra for Politico)

Mayor de Blasio tried to walk back his shelter-in-place comments, but the damage has been done and almost everyone remembers the de Blasio from two weeks ago that everyone hates. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

The Times profiles Brian Lehrer, the voice of NYC on the radio. (Jazmine Hughes for NY Times)

Takeout and delivery options for every situation. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 10, 2019 – The “MTA Gets A Taste Of Their Own Medication” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC will pause sending its homeless to the slums on Newark, de Blasio’s paid vacation bill is stalled in the City Council, the best dishes, and more

Beetlejuice needs a new home on Broadway. It’s being evicted from the Winter Garden Theater on June 6 to make way for “The Music Man” starring Hugh Jackman. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Holiday windows you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Con Ed, who had a banner summer in New York, is raising its rates in 2020, 2021, and 2022. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The MTA spent $600 million on 300 subway cars and only 18 arrived on time. These are the same trains that are less reliable than ones 30 years old. So not only are they providing poor service, but they’re also regularly late. Who does that sound like? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re the kind of person who goes out of your way to avoid hearing anyone singing Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas is You,” you you’ll want to avoid the Mariah Carey Christmas pop-up shop this weekend. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The city will suspend its program sending homeless New Yorkers to slums and condemned apartment buildings in Newark after the city of Newark filed a lawsuit in an attempt to stop the practice. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Fire up your Instagram account, the Museum of Ice Cream is back. (Lorence Fabricant for NY Times)

Imagine the kind of SantaCon-inspired event that even the SantaCon NYC organizers feel the need to distance themselves from. Welcome to SantaCon Hoboken. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York’s most iconic Art Deco buildings, mapped. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

The mayor has tried to push his paid vacation legislation through the City Council, but despite his announcement that the city would pass it this year, it appears to be stuck in limbo with opposition from small businesses and Speaker Corey Johnson. Maybe if he spent more time being the mayor and less cosplaying as a presidential candidate there would have been a chance. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The man who ate the $120,000 banana at Art Basel Miami Beach is Brooklyn artist David Datuna. He was not arrested for eating the banana. (Maya Kaufman and Staff for Patch)

If you’re craving more banana and duct tape art, street artist Joseph Grazi spent his weekend “creating” new works near the Essex Street Market. (Bowery Boogie)

Photos: Inside the former Coffee Shop in Union Square-turned-Chase bank. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Nightmare: Two women fell between subway cars and the train started moving at Broadway Junction shortly after midnight on Sunday. One woman died and the other is in stable position. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

7 enormous unfinished NYC infrastructure projects poised to change the city in the 2020s. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Mapping the tech takeover of New York City. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Working in an Amazon warehouse is more dangerous than working in a coal mine, and 42 members of the City Council, State Senate and Assembly are demanding safety improvements in the Staten Island warehouse. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Infatuation’s favorite new dishes of 2019. (The Infatuation)