The Briefly for October 7, 2019 – The “A $41 Million Oversight in Long Island City” Edition

Late-night subway closures, safe injection sites get another boost, the woman in the Bronx Zoo lion’s enclosure wasn’t as brave/stupid as you think, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

You’re in the clear for late-night trains this week, unless you’re taking the 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, A, F, N, Q, or R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Construction meant to eventually speed up the subways is causing all sorts of problems for anyone who needs to get around at night, especially for people coming and going from work. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Columbia University is honoring Maya Angelou, Gloria E. Anzaldúa, Diana Chang, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, A. Revathi, Ntozake Shange, and Leslie Marmon Silko by hanging their names on a banner above the names of male philosophers that are engraved on the building. (Untapped Cities)

Take a look at what Brooklyn’s tallest office building will look like on the inside. (Curbed)

With $41 million spent on the Hunter’s Point library, you wouldn’t imagine they’d already be rearranging the books, but here we are. Three fiction sections will be relocated after it was pointed out that they were only accessible via the stairs and anyone unable to use stairs would be shut out of those sections. The staff says they’ll retrieve books for people who want to check them out, but maybe instead an accessible library should have been designed instead. (Gothamist)

We’re getting close to peak foliage in the city, so until we’re past it I’ll keep listing these foliage guides. The carless New Yorker’s guide to fall foliage. (Patch)

The luxury apartment development that will sit on the old 5 Pointz spot in Queens got full-throated support for a 1,100 apartment expansion from Community Board 5 after setting aside 5,000 square feet for a library, creating additional below-market-rate housing, and increasing the size of the artist studio and gallery. (Curbed)

8 notable NYC projects designed by Latino architects. (Curbed)

Dante in Greenwich Village has been named the #1 bar in the world. (Time Out)

Did your favorites make the list? Here are the restaurants ordered closed this week. (Patch)

Is Governor Cuomo scared to open safe injection sites in the city? A federal judge ruled this week that safe injection sites don’t violate federal law, so what’s he waiting for? (Gothamist)

Para Roberto is the city’s newest monument which is in tribute to Roberto Clemente, which features bronze sugar cane stalks, a chair made of baseball bats and stickball bats adorned with the Puerto Rican flag. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Okay, who’s the asshole pointing lasers at planes? (Gothamist)

Five slices in five boroughs in one weekend day. It sounds impossible, but an uphill battle never stopped a New Yorker before. Welcome to the Five Borough Pizza Challenge. (QNS)

There was a rumor that an Outback Steakhouse was moving into the old Union Square Coffee Shop location. Thankfully, that rumor isn’t true, but a Chase bank is going in alongside a Just by Chole. (Gothamist)

The borough with the most heat and hot water complaints in the city is the Bronx, with 33.1% of the city’s complaints. (Curbed)

What building has the most complaints? It’s on Elmhurst Ave in Queens<>/a>. (Jackson Heights Post)

In praise of the vegan-egg sandwich that’s almost as satisfying as its bodega cousin. (Grub Street)

After the second friendly-fire killing this year, advocates are calling for more firearms training for the NYPD. (Gothamist)

Photo galleries of coslay from New York Comic Con: Gothamist | Gizmodo | Time Out | Brooklyn Vegan

An important note about Myah Autry, the woman wanted by the NYPD for jumping into the lion and giraffe enclosures at the Bronx Zoo: While she was inside the enclosure, she was on the other side of a moat from the lions and not nearly in the danger she’d like you to think she was in. Now her real danger comes from the NYPD. (NY Times)

A 24-year-old suspect was arrested for killing four men assumed to be homeless in Chinatown and a fifth was taken to a hospital. (NY Times)

A history of Red Hook’s Barnacle Parade, the annual taunting that Hurricane Sandy may have damaged the neighborhood but it did not break its spirits. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

It took less than a day for the brand new playground at Tompkins Square Park to be vandalized. (EV Grieve)

The 24th bike rider killed by a motorist in the city in 2019 is 10-year-old Dalerjon Shahobiddinov of Brooklyn. (Streetsblog)

Brooklyn’s best dive bars. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for June 14, 2019 – The “A Plan To Save Us All From the Sea” Edition

The religious exemption for vaccines is ending, a ball-pit bar is coming to Brooklyn, the weekend subway service changes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This is the end of the religious exemption from vaccines in New York state. The legislature agreed on a bill and the governor has said he would sign it to prevent future public health crises similar to the current measles outbreak. (NY Times)

It’s the weekend, so usual “check the subways before you go anywhere” rules apply. (Subway Weekender)

Get to know your Queens District Attorney candidates. (Queens Crap)

Jon Stewart, New York’s collective voice, had a heck of a week. It opened with shaming Congress, which resulted in moving the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund moving forward, and ended with an extremely personal gift from some grateful firefighters. (Gothamist)

The United States Army Corps of Engineers released a series of plans to save New York from when the sea rises up to eat us. Each of the proposals will cost billions of dollars and would dramatically change the city’s coastline. A plan will be selected either later this year or early next year. The plans range from a 25-year construction that would cost over $100 billion to nine years and cost about $15 billion. (Curbed)

The park at Essex Crossing in the Lower East Side is now open. (6sqft)

A 4-alarm fire broke out in Midwood that injured twelve and spread through three houses and was caught on fire. Three firefighters were among the twelve. (Gothamist)

Sometimes justice moves slowly. Elizabeth Lederer, the lead prosecutor in the Central Park Five case, will not return as a lecturer at Columbia Law School after the release of Netflix’s “When They See Us.” (amNY)

Here are the important points of info you need to know about the new rent reform package. (Gothamist)

There’s more to Coney Island than Nathan’s and Totonno’s. 9 places to eat in Coney Island, but honestly, all you need to know is Dona Zita. (Eater)

The 11234 zip code, where you can find Bergen Beach, Mill Basin and Flatlands, has more baby boomers than any other zipcode in the United States. The city has 14 of the top 20 zip codes for boomers, with the city holding the top four spots. (Patch)

The old Coffee Shop in Union Square is going to become a Chase Bank. (Gothamist)

There’s an office tower in Manhattan unfortunately named “Penn15.” (The Real Deal)

Where to eat a last minute dinner in the East Village. (The Infatuation)

The people in the city’s homeless shelters are treated like numbers and the employees of the Department of Homeless Services appears to be abusing “emergency” transfers to move people around for seemingly no reason. (NY Times)

Is El Museo del Barrio turning its back on the local Latinx community? The Mirror Manifesto, an open letter signed by artists, was read while protestors occupied the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. (Gothamist)

Starting July 1, the NYPD will take a different tact with people who are homeless on the subway and commit minor infractions. Instead of a summons, they will be sent to a detox facility, shelter, or to get other kinds of help as needed. The purpose of the pilot program is to divert people away from the court system and to work to minimize subway disruptions, which had tripled in the last few years. (Patch)

Remember the most expensive apartment in the city? The one that came with two tickets two space, a yacht, two full-time servants, and a bevy of other amenities that seemed too good to be true? Turns out it was a fake and a marketing tactic for the building. The listing was a combination of about a dozen different apartments on the 45th floor. (Curbed)

What’s the best time of year to look for an apartment in the city? StreetEasy broke it down neighborhood by neighborhood, and we’re heading into the worst time of year for most areas. (Curbed)

It might not be surprising that the neighborhoods with the most excessive airplane noise are in Queens, with Brookville, Howard Beach, and Flushing topping the list. (Localize.Labs)

If you’ve fallen in love with the MTA’s new rainbow transit heart, you can find it on some of the city’s 1 trains and on MetroCards. Five subway trains are sporting the MTA Pride logo and you can get special edition World Pride MetroCards at a few select subway stations. (Gothamist)

The unofficial MTA Pride Train signs are back across the city. (amNY)

Turns out dads can be stay-at-home parents too! Who knew? (amNY)

There’s coffee and then there’s coffee. Sawada, a Tokyo-style cafe, is “one of the most genuinely inspired additions to the New York coffee scene in some time.” (Eater)

The Barclays Center announced a free summer concert series featuring Andy Suzuki & The Method, Nappy Nina and Dj Donwill, DJ Mick, and more. (The Brooklyn Reader)

An analysis from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs indicates that the president’s immigration policies are having a chilling effect on immigrants using SNAP benefits. The rate of non-citizens dropping out of the program is four times higher than citizens dropping out. (NY Times)

Let’s ask the scary questions. How safe is the elevator in your building? (the Real Deal)

Let’s all say farewell to the small superheroes of NYC, with the last season of Jessica Jones closing out The Defenders’ run on Netflix. Daredevil, Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher, and Jessica Jones were New York City’s heroes and the fun game of where was that filmed?” will have to be reserved for re-watches. (amNY)

They don’t make subway stations like they used to. This time it was Atlantic Terminal that saw a crumbling ceiling along the D, N, R tracks. This incident can be attributed to a non-MTA contractor puncturing the ceiling while taking a soil sample above ground, but add it to the list of inconveniences we all absorb on a daily basis. (amNY)

A ball-pit bar is coming to… no not Bushwick, but very close to it. (Gothamist)

Inside the NYPL’s Stonewall exhibition. (Gothamist)

This week in NIMBY news: The homeless shelter on Billionaire’s Row has cleared a legal hurdle but the neighborhood continues to fight against it. (Curbed)

In more NIMBY news, Community Board 2 has overwhelmingly voted against the mayor’s Rikers Island neighborhood replacement. (Brooklyn Paper)

The Grub Street guide to the summer’s “Can’t-Miss” food festivals. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 6, 2019 – The “Oh No, He’s Actually Going to Run for President, Isn’t He” Edition

The mayor’s Vision Zero program is beginning to fail, the best tacos, Jagged Little Pill plans to bring people to theaters, teens attacked by acid, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes and diversions are minimally awful. (Subway Changes)

A review of Decade of Fire, playing at the Metrograph, which tackles the topic of the burning of the Bronx in the 70s and the organizations that rallied to rebuild when no one else would. (Curbed)

Oh god. He’s actually going to run for President, isn’t he? (Splinter)

How to spend 12 hours on Governors Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jagged Little Pill, which may actually be a bad album, is coming to Broadway on November 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The 10 oldest libraries in the city and their secret histories. (Untapped Cities)

Some teens threw a raucous party in the basement of an NYCHA development. The party ended when someone poured an acid-like liquid onto them from above. (NY Times)

Some people are happy with laundry machines in their building. Others get a million dollar yacht, who Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini, a Hamptons house rental for a summer, and courtside Nets season tickets. Yes, all of those amenities are for one apartment. Welcome to the wildest luxuries for city homes. (Patch)

RIP Lew Fidler. Fidler was a Brooklyn politician, who was a champion for homeless youth in the city council, the environment, and LGBTQ youth. (Politico)

The top twelve brunch spots in the city. Let this serve as a reminder if you want to go anywhere for brunch this weekend. Mother’s Day approaches. (Patch)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants and bars. (amNY)

Scenes from the Union Square cannabis parade and rally from Saturday. (EV Grieve)

It took six years, but the Office of Emergency Management has unveiled lower Manhattan’s solution against a Hurricane Sandy-like storm has arrived. They’ll use… sandbags. Really big sandbags. This took six years. (NY Times)

Margaritaville is a state of mind, but it’s also going to be a resort on the corner of 40th and Seventh Ave. (New York YIMBY)

Katz’s has survived New York since 1888 and New Yorkers have survived Katz’s enormous sandwiches for just as long. I’ll have what she’s having. (Food Insider)

Mark your calendars, November 9 will be Wu-Tang Clan Day, and to celebrate you’ll be able to go to the corner of Targee Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in Staten Island, which is the Wu-Tang Clan District as of this weekend. (The Root)

RIP Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died over the weekend due to Parkinson’s disease complications. Brown was the Queens District Attorney for nearly thirty years and had been on the judiciary since 1973, who had been on a leave of absence from the job since March. (QNS)

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, whose decisions are helping destroy the Amazon and whose racism, homophobia and bigotry tops any racist uncle you’ve got on Facebook, will skip the NYC gala in his honor after it had become clear that New Yorkers will tolerate a lot of punishment, but hosting him is a step too far. (NY Times)

Breathe easy, literally, if you take the L train, the first dust report is in and the concentration of silica dust is well below the benchmarks for dangerous exposure. (NY Times)

BreakfastClub founder and author of BREAKFAST: The Cookbook shares her favorite breakfasts in the city. (Time Out)

Where to have a graduation lunch or dinner. (The Infatuation)

It seems that Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero program has begun to fail. (amNY)

Youfeng Xu was killed crossing Seventh Avenue with the light in Sunset Park, the person behind the wheel of the truck was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian and failure to exercise due care. (Streetsblog)

A three-year-old boy was killed while in a crosswalk in front of a stop sign by a van in Bath Beach last week on a street that the city has known to be dangerous for at least five years. The driver blamed the child’s death on his mother. (Gothamist)

Candy. Where do you get it? Anywhere? Wrong. You get it at Economy Candy. (ABC 7 NY)

Senior citizens outnumber millennials when it comes to renting apartments. (NY Times)

An ice cream parlor for humans and dogs. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Here’s how New York’s proposed voter affiliation deadline change could help Bernie Sanders in the 2020 presidential election. (Gothamist)

35 outstanding tacos in NYC. (Eater)

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