The Briefly for September 15-17, 2020 – The “Flesh Eating Bacteria? Who Cares, It’s 2020” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning, the number of Covid-19 positive tests in schools increases, where to eat outside in Park Slope, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 68˚
Clear throughout the day.

This isn’t NYC specific, but Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren fired Police Chief La’Ron Singletary, demonstrating that some mayors know how and when to yield their powers. (Michael Wilson and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

Photos: Behind the scenes in Chinatown. (Molly Tavoletti for RESY)

New York City’s highways, reimagined in a subway map. (Zirocket on r/NYC)

We’re inching closer to normal because the F train is closing on nights and weekends for construction. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

It’s not all bad news for the subway, there’s a new escalator in Union Square on the L platform. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Five Connecticut residents were hospitalized with a flesh eating bacteria after going in the water in the Long Island Sound this summer” barely even was a blip on the radar. What a year. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Can you help identify this woman, who had a shitfit in a Verizon store when told to wear a mask, throwing around the N-word as she left the store? In a city with so many assholes, she still managed to be the asshole of the week and it’s only Tuesday. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Want to ride the subway or bus without a mask? Get ready for a $50 fine. Next question: Will they fine the NYPD when they ride without masks? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

NYU’s dorm Rubin Hall is on lockdown after 4 students tested positive for Covid-19. (Matthew Fischetti and Trace Miller for Washington Square News)

Photos: The “new” Chelsea Flea opened over the weekend. (Scott LYnch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn Public Libraries in Midwood, Kensington, Mill Basin, Walt Whitman, Washington Irving, and the Annex in Dumbo are open for grab-and-go lending. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The City Council will vote on the Industry City rezoning today. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, whose district contains Industry City, has come out against the rezoning. The City Council usually defers to the local councilmember for these decisions, but multiple members have come out against his stance. (Greg David for The City)

What’s happening to us? New York City’s zip codes don’t even touch the ten most expensive zip codes in the country. (Tim Moran for Patch)

Photos: Baby lynx cubs in the Queens Zoo! (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Cloister Cafe was shut down by the SLA in August du to social distancing violations by its patrons but reopened this week thanks to a temporary restraining order against the suspension by a judge. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of how the police unions, full of white Republicans who live in the suburbs, betrayed the city they are supposed to serve by endorsing President Trump. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

The year in (sad) photos. (Tribeca Citizen)

The NYPD takes a full minute longer to respond to shootings and other crisis incidents than they did a year ago. Ambulances are arriving faster than ever before. (Suhali Bhat for The City)

A new vegetarian burger spot, Pop’s Eat-Rite, is opening up a block from Superiority Burger. I, for one, look forward to this burgeoning vegetarian burger district. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to Coyote Ugly, whose original location is officially gone, but it sounds like a new location is coming. (EV Grieve)

Photos: I’ll never not link to photos of goats mowing the grass. (Forrest Michael Bomann for Untapped New York)

The MTA is betting big on the federal government bailing them out to the tune of $12 billion. The rest of us live here on earth. (Jose Martinez for The City)

The Thanksgiving Day Parade isn’t happening. Let’s just go take a nap until it’s 2021. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Want to ask the 2021 mayoral candidates a question? Here’s your chance. (The City)

This isn’t new, but sometimes I think about how Governor Cuomo said he changed his mind about the L train because someone yelled at him on the street. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist in 2019)

Satire: Help! I’m Being Priced out of the Neighborhood I Gentrified. (Graham Isador The Hard Times)

“Teaching has a powerful way of consuming your time that is antipode to the stay-at-home summer of 2020. I’m optimistic that the new school year will sweep away my grief — grief for the hardship and loss my students experienced these past few months, for not being there to offer hugs and high fives, for missing yearbook signing and graduation photo swapping, and for a lackluster farewell. I trust that the new school year will bring with it acceptance, even as I hold on to the wonderful young learners who have filled this classroom with laughter and wonder before.”
Krisy Lawlor, a teacher in the Bronx, My classroom is a time capsule , for Chalkbeat

Last week the number was 19, this week 55 school employees tested positive for Covid-19. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state threatened to cut 9,000 jobs from NYC school less than one month ago. (Reema Amin for Patch)

Monday, the mayor announced the city will hire 2,000 additional teachers to meet the demands of blended learning. 2,000 is extremely short of the 10,000 teachers the principal’s union called for to make blended learning possible. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

School nurses are reporting that they’ve yet to receive any PPE for the school year. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

42% of NYC students opted for remote learning, up from 26% a few weeks ago. (Lauren Cook for PIX11)

A look at the next Bowery Mural from Mojo, in progress. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Turns out New York’s most famous guitar teacher Dan Smith will still teach you guitar. A story of how Smith is teaching former Governor David Patterson to play guitar. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Expect a marketing campaign to persuade you to vote for Joe Biden under the Working Families Party, as without either 130,000 votes or 2% of the total vote, the Working Families Party will lose ballot access. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Park Slope. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helene for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 1, 2020 – The “A $3.75 Reduced-Service Subway Ride” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest with school openings, the mayor wants a vaccine before indoor dining returns, where to eat outside in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 78˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

Today (Sept 1), the United Federation of Teachers’ executive board will meet to vote to authorize a strike at 3:30 pm. From a friend, I’ve heard the teachers will push for an October opening of school for in-person instruction. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Looking to make a temporary change in your address? The Times has some service journalism for you to make sure your mail gets delivered. (A.C. Shilton for NY Times)

Free bus rides are over. Front boarding started on Monday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A bus or subway fare could be raised a dollar, as hinted by MTA officials, paired with a 40% reduction in service, in an attempt to close the $9 billion gap in the MTA’s budget. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

Five cheap ways to improve the subway from a policy analyst from the Manhattan Institute. Not all of these ideas are good. (Connor Harris for Streetsblog)

There is no combination of state efforts that can address New York’s financial crisis. The full damage that the Covid-19 virus has laid upon New York state is $59 billion, meaning there is no possible way the state can tax its way out of this hole. Watch this argument carefully, because Governor Cuomo will use this to defend his decision to never increase taxes on the state’s super-rich. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state kicked the can down the road, but October 1 is the new date for the tidal wave of evictions when the moratorium ends. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The mayor created his own deadline of October 1 to either cut one billion from the city’s costs from labor or he would fire 22,000 municipal employees. On Monday, the day city employees were ready to hear about who was “at-risk” for being fired, the mayor announced that unions have asked for more time to resolve the issue. The sword of Damocles still hangs. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

September 1 gives us two months left of outdoor dining in NYC. As bars and restaurants look ahead, the question becomes “How do we survive this?” A spotlight on Jeremy’s Ale House, who doesn’t see past Halloween, unless people are allowed inside. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The biggest question looming over the city might not be “when will The Briefly return to five days a week?,” but “when is indoor dining coming back?” The mayor’s answer seems to change every day. In the last week, he’s said that the school openings would dictate it, that it wouldn’t return until the new year, and now until we see a vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How much is a life worth? Layleen Polanco’s family was awarded $5.9 million after her death after nine days in solitary confinement at Rikers Island while being held on $500 bail, a record for an inmate’s death. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The NYPD has issued a “discipline penalty matrix” that outlines specific punishments for instances of police misconduct. This isn’t in response to recent violence from the NYPD against the citizens it is supposed to protect, but form the recommendation of a 2018 independent panel. Despite the matrix, the NYPD Commissioner has the ability to ignore the matrix. The NYCLU says this is no reason to celebrate because it doesn’t show a culture of change in the NYPD and Commissioner Shea and Mayor de Blasio’s comments appear to be on the side of protecting police officers. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A 2017 NYPD “challenge coin” from East Flatbush is so racist you may have to see it to believe it that celebrates the “hunting of man” and features a caricature of a black man with dreadlocks with the shadow of a deer. (Jon Campbell for Gothamist)

Riis Park’s popularity in the last few years partially has Riis Park Beach Bazaar to thank. The lease for Riis Park Beach Bazaar is up and won’t be renewed. Instead, they have been invited to submit a proposal to compete with other vendors. (The Rockaway Times)

This is what life is like when you’re quarantined in an apartment with Miss Universe and Miss USA. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Gyms in the city will be virtually inspected before reopening on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Yeah, you’ve been to Governors Island, but have you been to the haunted basketball court on Governors Island? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Sutphin Blvd-Archer Ave. and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer E train stations will be closed from September 19 through November as the MTA replaces 5,500 feet of track and more than 7,800 feet of third rail. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s pronounced “How-stun.” Here’s why. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

One of the three lawsuits blocking the Two Bridges megadevelopment was reversed, but it’s still not a green light to move forward. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s land use review process comes back mid-month, which will mean Gowanus will become the epicenter of the fight over redevelopment in the city. (Amy Plitt for BKLYNER)

“The fight against Industry City has implications beyond the neighborhood. It has implications for any of us who see the city as a site of civic engagement, as a place where community thrives. It’s community, the very idea of it, that’s destroyed, as the privatization of neighborhoods grows bolder and less restrained.”
– Peter Rugh, Sunset Park is Afraid of Industry City’s Expansion, The Rest of Us Should Be Too for The Indypendent

The Mermaid Inn in the East Village is closing. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at waacking and its history from dance clubs in the city in the 70s and how it ended up as a Tik Tok sensation. (Ted Alcorn, video by Mohamed Sadek for NY Times)

Columbia University removed “pretty significant” slave owner Samuel Bard’s name from Bard Hall, with a promise to rename the building in the fall. (Amanda Rosa for NY Times)

Why was a statue of Christopher Columbus and the green space surrounding it in the Bronx’s Little Italy locked up? The Parks Department says it was a staff error. The statue has been protected by the NYPD since June. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Former Queens DA hopeful Tiffany Cabán is expected to run for City Council in Astoria when Costa Constantinides’s term limit is up in 2021. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Where to eat out on Staten Island. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 7, 2020 – The “Mess With the Bull, Get the Horns” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo gets petty, de Blasio breaks another promise, eight NYC rooftops, how to renegotiate rent, the NYPD fights the chokehold ban, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 80˚
Rain in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 71˚ High: 84˚

A guide to renegoiate your rent. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

An executive order will allow the courts to suspend eviction proceedings through September 4. It’s not a complete ban on eviction hearings, but it gives the courts leeway to suspend deadlines. (Sydney Pereira with Beth Fertig and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Do not buy a car,” says mayor who gets driven literally everywhere. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Lucky, the East Village bar that started a petition calling for Governor Cuomo to reverse his “substantial amounts of food” mandate with drink orders, had its liquor license suspended for not serving food with its drink orders. Classic petty Cuomo. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state attorney general’s office is suing to dissolve the NRA. AG Letitia James made the announcement on Thursday. Washington DC is also suing the NRA. 148 years ago the NRA was chartered in New York, giving the state the jurisdiction over it. (Danny Hakim for NY Times)

A look at another broken promise of Bill de Blasio: release a complete history of all complaints against every officer in the NYPD and how his corporate counsel made the decision not to release anything for the time being. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

NYPD unions brought a lawsuit seeking to stop a new city law that makes it a crime for police officers to use chokeholds or kneel on a suspect’s neck or back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are over 900 NYPD officers that have refused to participate in investigations into alleged misconduct, creating an immense backlog for the Civilian Complaint Review Board. Cowards. If a private citizen doesn’t want to participate in an investigation into alleged wrongdoings on their part, they don’t seem to have a choice. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Even as its population is shrinking, the use of force against inmates at Rikers Island is at an all-time high. (Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Have you taken to indoor gardening? You’re not the only one. You might say that the hobby is… growing on New Yorkers. (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Porn: A $3.25 million Brooklyn Heights waterfront loft. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at the opening of Rangoon, one of NYC’s strictly Burmese restaurants. (Sai Mokhtari for Gothamist)

Welcome to the neighborhood Any Thing, a new bar in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, whose bar features only distilled and/or supported spirits that are women-owned. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Something’s wrong in your rented apartment. Who should pay for repairs? (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

Dr. Oxiris Barbot is only the latest high profile woman of color to leave the de Blasio administration. She joins Deputy Mayors Lilliam Barrios Paoli and Herminia Palacio, mayoral aide Rachel Noerdlinger, his first Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett, Children’s Services Commissioner Gladys Carrion, and NYCHA Chair Shola Olatoye. Maybe it’s time to ask the question: Does the mayor have a problem with women of color? (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Black Tap is starting up CrazyShake deliveries on Monday. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Exploring NYC’s iconic works of public art. (Untapped New York)

It’s an unremarkable building in St Louis, but it once stood as one of the pavilions at the World’s Fair in 1964. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

The world’s largest bronze gorilla sculpture, titled King Nyani by Gillie and Marc Schnatter, is coming to Hudson Yards’ Bella Abzug Park. Once installed later this month, three people will be able to fit in the gorilla’s hand. The sculpture is part of an awareness campaign to raise funds for the critically endangered gorilla species. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Next week is the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower, which you’ll be able to see on a clear night. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Hulu’s High Fidelity series, which eschewed Chicago for Brooklyn, is canceled. (Bill Pearis for BrooklyVegan)

We have anything that you’d find at a New York bodega, turned vegan,” – Jeremy Dean, owner of the newly opened Vodega in DUMBO. I know where I’m going this weekend. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Remember gyms? Governor Cuomo says you won’t see a gym open in New York anytime soon. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

That won’t stop everyone, as some gyms like BYKlyn Cycle in Park Slope (of course, it’s Park Slope) opened a pop-up outdoor spinning studio. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything you need to know about the NYC quarantine checkpoints. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in Greenpoint. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

While the mayor didn’t come out and directly support a tax on the city’s mega-rich, he went as far as to say that he won’t cater the city’s policies around trying to lure them back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

List: Recent restaurants and bars that closed, including Jack the Horse Tavern in Brooklyn Heights, 88 Lan Noodle in Chinatown, Fonda in the East Village, and more. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The MTA is expanding its program of putting cameras on buses to ticket drivers parked in bus lanes. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The 8 rooftops now open with the best views of NYC. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

There has been a years-long fight to grant Ezras Nashim, an all-female Orthodox volunteer emergency medical service and focus of the documentary 93 Queen, an ambulance license. They have been using their own vehicles to respond to emergencies and were denied a license last summer due to objections from the Hatzalah emergency medical service. Within the Orthodox community, modesty is a real issue, and women can be forced to make a choice between their modesty and a real medical emergency. That is a position that no one should have to be in. Women are not allowed to join the Borough Park chapter of Hatzalah, exacerbating the issue. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Are NYC schools ready to handle students and teachers? Here’s a better question: Do their HVAC systems work at all? (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

On its 100th birthday the Wonder Wheel stands silent. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

A guide to the city’s food halls that have reopened for outdoor dining, takeout, and delivery. (Erika Adams for Eater)