The Briefly for September 17, 2019 – The “Can $51 Billion Fix the Subways?” Edition

NY has subpoenaed Trump’s tax returns, the best fast-casual in Midtown, ShaneGillis was fired from SNL, the MTA’s fraudulent on-time numbers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All 1.1 million NYC students will be excused on Friday if they skip school to participate in the nationwide protests ahead of the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (NY Times)

The citywide ban on cashless businesses has stalled, with the bill’s co-sponsors optimistically calling it “not dead.” (King’s County Politics)

A dive into the freshly released $51 billion MTA Capital Plan. (Second Ave Sagas)

The MTA Capital Plan incorporates many of Andy Byford’s ideas from his Fast Forward plan. (Gothamist)

The plan will pay for signals will be installed on 11 subway lines. (Patch)

The next phase of the Second Ave Subway is included in the plan. (6sqft)

What to know about Governor Cuomo’s flavored vape ban. (amNY)

The express F train is no longer a surprise, as of this week the F train express returns for two trains in each direction during morning and afternoon commutes. (amNY)

If you want to own a piece of Anthony Boudain’s life, his possessions are going to be auctioned off online next month. The money raised will go to his family and to a scholarship to the Culinary Institute of America in his name. (Grub Street)

Remember the MTA’s announcement that their service is improving? Those numbers have been historically fraudulent. (Signal Problems)

Governor Cuomo’s attempt to handle the homeless population on the subways with finger-pointing highlights the blind eye he’s turned toward’s the state’s homeless problem. (Gothamist)

Sitting on the wall of Keens Steakhouse is a bloody and possibly cursed playbill from the Ford Theater from the night Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat omakase sushi for less than $100. (The Infatuation)

How the U.N. General Assembly will screw up traffic this month. (Curbed)

Inside the fight to rezone and revitalize Crown Heights. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

It’s no longer a question of when. State prosecutors in Manhattan have subpoenaed eight years of tax returns from President Trump from his personal and corporate accounting firm. (NY Times)

The lawsuit over 80 Flatbush Ave’s development between the 400 & 500 State Street Block Association and Alloy Development was privately settled, paving a clear road for demolition and construction to begin in the spring. (Curbed)

The worry over moving New York’s presidential primary is over. The governor signed a bill that, once again, moves the primary to April. (QNS)

Video: A look at how Fay Da Bakery became the most iconic Chinese bakery in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

SNL un-hired Shane Gillis for his past racist and homophobic comments. (Gothamist)

Want to get into the spirit of San Gennaro without, you know, actually going to San Gennaro? Here are seven alternatives, from restaurants to pastry shops. (amNY)

Yesterday’s Briefly linked to a story about how 25% of the city’s luxury apartments built since 2013 have never been sold. Consider 432 Park a monument to that stat as it becomes the tallest residential building in the world. (Gothamist)

20 outstanding fast-casual restaurants in Midtown. (Eater)

Thanks to @miner0727 for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for September 16, 2019 – The “JUUL Miss Me When I’m Gone” Edition

Late-night subway disruptions, the MTA’s ballooning budget, the weekly restaurant closures, Rudy Giuliani’s divorce gets messy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

It’s a short list of subways that will be disrupted late nights this week. Even still, if you’re on the 1, 4, A, E, or R trains, you’ll want to check before you make late-night plans. (Subway Weekender)

It’s possible that the Cuomo-Byford feud may be softening. (Politico)

The city will allow bicyclists to ride past the United Nations during the General Assembly, a departure from previous years. It still won’t be easy. Each bicyclist will have to pass a security checkpoint before proceeding. (Streetsblog)

The governor announced the state will ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes with an emergency ruling. (Politico)

The city will be showing off some early design concepts for the Sunnyside Yards. (Sunnyside Post)

The city is calling its renovation of Fort Greene “routine work” to avoid doing a full environmental review. The Sierra Club is leading a lawsuit against the city for the classification and lack of review. (Patch)

The photos of Battery Park as a wheat field are weird. In 1982 there were two acres of wheat planted as an art installation which also yielded a thousand pounds of wheat. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA was headed for a $392 million budget gap in 2020, but that was before the MTA decided to hire 500 additional police officers. (Politico)

The MTA’s on-time performance rate hit 84% last month from 68% the previous August. The future of the MTA is all in the 2020-2024 capital plan, which hasn’t been made public and will be voted on on October 1. (6sqft)

Where to have a last-minute fancy dinner. (The Infatuation)

“I’m sad to know that the hero of 9/11 has become a liar.” Is anyone surprised that Rudy Giuliani’s divorce is a huge mess? (Splinter)

Luxury apartments are changing the city’s skyline, but they aren’t selling. 25% of the luxury apartments built since 2013 have never been sold. (Gothamist)

Speaking of luxury apartments, there will be 700 new luxury apartments will be built in Dumbo as part of a development on a three-acre parking lot. (NY Times)

A class-action lawsuit over a lack of wine coolers in luxury apartments in Hudson Square. (Patch)

Here are this week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. No one hit over 100 points, but the Eataly kiosks in Flatiron had the highest violation score. (Patch)

The mayor is fighting back against allegations that his sudden embrace of restricting hotel development in the city has something to do with a presidential endorsement from the Hotel Trades Council union. (Politico)

Would you love to brunch at the new TWA Hotel but don’t want to travel like a peasant to get there? Well, now you can take a private helicopter to brunch from lower Manhattan. (Time Out)

After a few weeks of confusion, the state has clarified that landlords and brokers are both going to be held to the new $20 application fee limit. Before the ruling, agents were charging high fees because a landlord wasn’t allowed to. (Gothamist)

A man with a sword was arrested at the observation deck of the Empire State Building. (amNY)

It’s the kind of trash talk you need to see to believe. (@edenbrower)

Whoops, an NYPD school safety officer was arrested for possession of three pounds of marijuana. (SI Live)

Are you the person who bought a $10 million lotto ticket in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Sometimes trash is old food and mile-long CVS receipts. Sometimes it’s 20,000 slides of fashion shows from the 1980s. (Jezebel)

22 places for a stellar meal in Soho. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 29, 2019 – The “Fried Chicken Sandwich Ridiculousness Ends This Week” Edition

The police union calls for de Blasio and O’Neill’s removal, 15 trendy restaurants you can get into, security measures for the West Indian Day Parade, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A ban on foie gras is working its way through the city council and could come up for a vote in the fall. More than half of the council has so-sponsored the bill and it has support from the mayor, but there are questions about the ability to enforce the bill. (NY Times)

Despite the ever-changing nature of the city, Gem Spa is swimming upstream on the corner of St. Marks and 2nd Ave in a struggle to survive. (NY Times)

New construction can’t stop the rats. (Bowery Boogie)

This week ends the Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich frenzy that took over August, as all locations will be completely sold out of the sandwich. (Grub Street)

Google Pigeon is turning to crowdsourcing to solve real-time public transit information, kinda like Waze for the buses and trains. It might be hard to log a delay between stations without a connection to the internet. (Streetsblog)

Photos: Inside Borough Park’s Torah Animal World, which is full of taxidermied animals mentioned in the Torah. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be distracted, the classics are still the only real way to enjoy a meal at Katz’s Deli. (Eater)

The Department of Buildings blames construction materials stored on the roof for the building collapse on Tuesday in the Bronx, calling it a “preventable tragedy.” (Gothamist)

Here’s what eliminating the city’s schools’ gifted programs would look like and what would take their place. (Chalk Beat)

The 21 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall. (Time Out)

The United States could lose its measles elimination status by October if more cases of the disease are discovered in NYC or NY state. (Huff Post)

Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate activist, arrived via a solar-powered boat on Wednesday after a 15-day trip across the Atlantic to attend the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (NY Times)

It’s rare, but every now and then you come across a subway busker actually worth listening to, like these two guys nailing Prince’s “Kiss.” (Gothamist)

How “public” is New York City’s public transportation? If it doesn’t serve all, who is it meant to serve? (The Indypendent)

No one wants to hear it (except the Halloween-obsessed spooks), but summer is coming to an end. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

How to spend a day eating, drinking, and enjoying Snug Harbor in Staten Island. (NY Times)

The police union passed a vote of no confidence Wednesday in Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill, calling for O’Neill to resign and for Governor Cuomo to remove Mayor de Blasio from office. This is in protest over the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold on Eric Garner lead to his death. (Politico)

The history of the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (6sqft)

The NYPD announced safety measures for the West Indian Day Parade, summarizing their approach with “There will literally be a cop everywhere.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What happened to the city’s safe injection sites? The mayor announced them in May of 2018, but none have opened. Activists that gathered outside Cuomo’s Manhattan offices are blaming the governor for intentionally delaying the state’s mandated review of the program. (Gothamist)

Did you talk shit about Amazon after they announced their Long Island City HQ2 plans? If you did, you’re probably in a secret “NY Negative Statements” dossier the company kept. (Gothamist)

The Notorious B.I.G., but in Funko Pop form. (Brooklyn Vegan)

What the Dodgers meant to Brooklyn. (Brooklyn this Week)

The New York Fire Department forced a Muslim firefighter to shave his beard in violation of his religious beliefs, according to a new lawsuit. (Patch)

15 trendy restaurants you can get into. (The Infatuation)