The Briefly for August 5, 2020 – The “Everyone is Abandoning de Blasio’s Ship” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city unveils its blended school plans, a wave of evictions looms, a Krispy Kreme opens in Harlem, new restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Yesterday we looked at the most expensive zip codes in the city (East and Greenwich Village, Tribeca), but let’s look at the six most affordable neighborhoods in Manhattan. Yes, all of them are north of 14th St. If not for Murray Hill/Kips Bay, they’d all be north of 86th. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Mayor de Blasio said the NYPD is withdrawing from the scores of streets and sidewalks around station houses that it seized during recent Black Lives Matter protests — but no one has seen evidence of this year. Once again the mayor is paying deference to the police department instead of leading the city. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

The absolute biggest story developing this week is the resignation of Dr. Oxiris Barbot. From Mayor de Blasio’s comments, it appears she was pushed out and he would not say if she was asked to leave. Firing your health commissioner in the middle of a pandemic? That screams “stable leadership.” In yesterday’s edition, I linked to a story about six staff resignations because of the mayor’s stance with the NYPD. It was Dr. Barbot’s letter notes that she leaves with “deep disappointment” that the health department’s expertise wasn’t used to the degree it could have been. It was back in March where stories broke of the mayor’s staff threatening resignations over his mishandling of Covid-19 in the early days in the city. Now, we’re here. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Photos: Jennifer Lawrence’s Upper East Side penthouse sold for a $6 million loss. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

In the face of a possible 90% of music venues being forced to permanently shut down due to the pandemic, say hello to the New York Independent Venue Association, an affiliate of the National Independent Venue Association, who have been pushing the passage of the Save Our Stages Act and the Restart Act. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Not everything is bad all the time, a new Krispy Kreme opened on W 125th St on Tuesday! (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The second wave of the pandemic in New York may not be medical in nature, but a wave of one million evictions that could be filed in the next four months, 12 times the average. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

To fight evictions, when all else has failed, some New Yorkers are turning to the Depression-era tactic to stay in their homes of community protest and public shaming of landlords. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Can the cutlet sandwich be rehabilitated? That’s the goal of Cutlets Sandwich Co. I didn’t know it needed help? Especially after the year the chicken parm had last year. (Rob Patronite for Grub Street)

You can now rent your own mini-“lawn” on the rooftop at South Street Seaport for lawn games, live DJ sets, and movies shown on the 32′ LED screen. Never underestimate the adaptability of a business that wants to make money. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Christmas Spectacular at Rockefeller Center is canceled for the first time in its 87 years. (Julia Carmel for NY Times)

There was a building collapse on Bedford Ave in Williamburg on Tuesday amid all the wind and storms, but there were no reported injuries. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

File under “Look at these assholes.” There are party promoters still throwing nightclub parties in venues across the city for wealthy idiots. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A man sitting in his car in Queens was killed by a falling tree as a result of Tropical Storm Isaias on Tuesday, which hit the city with Hurricane Sandy-level winds. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Department of Education released a partial plan for blended learning in city schools. The department says the same standards will apply to blended and remote learning. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Students who don’t comply with requirements to wear masks in schools will be sent home and barred from in-person learning according to Chancellor Richard Carranza. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

After six weeks, Ritchie Torres and Representative Carolyn B. Maloney have been declared winners in their respective Democratic congressional primaries. (Jesse McKinley, Shane Goldmacher and Matt Stevens for NY Times)

New restaurant openings for August. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 24, 2020 – The “Fight For Your Right To Party Or Not?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: New York’s rent relief program, the 2020 blue wave headed for Albany, the NYPD fight against disclosure, where to eat in LIC, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 76˚ High: 90˚

Here’s a combination of words you wouldn’t expect to describe New York City: “humid subtropical climate zone.” Welcome to the era of the sultry night in New York City. (Lisa M Collins for NY Times)

The details about applying for Covid-19 rent relief. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

With the program being called “an endless pit of despair,” the rollout of the program has been anything but smooth, with technical problems plaguing literally every step of the way. The deadline closes for applications on July 30. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Videos: Watch purple lightning hit NYC, including the Statue of Liberty. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Because life isn’t hard enough for the owners of bars right now, the State Liquor Authority is demanding that bars must provide a “sit-down experience” with enough food to be shared by a small group and food must be ordered with the first round. Listen, let me drink my beer and leave me alone with this. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Ellen’s Stardust Diner on W 51st may be shutting down due to $618,459.22 in unpaid rent. In a confusing move, the landlords have put up a notice that they will assume possession of the property by August 7, despite the eviction moratorium in place through August 20. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A federal judge temporarily blocked the de Blasio administration’s plan to disclose tens of thousands of newly available police disciplinary records. Police unions argued that the public should not see “unsubstantiated” claims, while the rest of us argue that being able to see how many claims are listed as unsubstantiated is a part of seeing how the NYPD holds itself accountable. The NYCLU has some of the records, which they obtained with a FOIL request, but have been ordered not to release them. (Christopher Robbins and George Joseph for Gothamist)

The City, Gothamist/WNYC, ProPublica, and The Marshall Project want to hear about your experiences with the NYPD to help hold the NYPD accountable. (Terry Parris Jr for The City)

20 restaurants with takeout windows and seat-yourself tables. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The story of U Thant Island, the city’s smallest island. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Councilman Ritchie Torres declared himself the winner in the NY-15 Democratic Congressional primary. The results aren’t official, but it doesn’t look likely he’ll lose. If elected, he’ll be one of the first two Black openly LGBTQ members of Congress, along with Mondaire Jones from NY-17. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Jabari Brisport declared victory in Brooklyn’s 25th Senate District Democratic primary over Assemblywoman Tremaine Wright. If elected (and there’s a pretty darn good chance of that in the general election), Brisport will become the first openly gay person of color in the State Senate. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

How Brooklyn Assembly insurgents rode absentee ballots to upset incumbents in this year’s even more blue wave. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Results for Covid-19 test conducted by the city have been dramatically cut down to two days and the city’s “Test + Trace” program found and isolated 2,000 people with coronavirus symptoms. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The driver of a pickup truck drove into an outdoor dining area in Sunset Park, sending three people to the hospital with minor injuries. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Robert Sietsema’s 10 favorite pandemic takeout dishes. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

In a message to the youths, Governor Cuomo said that while he respects your right to party, “ThIs Is NoT tHe TiMe To FiGhT FoR YoUr RiGhT tO pArTy” (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“The severe hailstorm was well-forecasted. Policing systems have forever been weaponized against minority groups to galvanize white supremacist agendas. To attack systemic racism is to acknowledge history and our own ignorance of it: Black lives have suffered injustice since the inception of our country. The change we bled for yesterday is the change we die for today.”
-Michela Wang, a student at Newark Academy, “This Is Not New”: Thoughts On Protests From NYC Teens for Gothamist

If you’ve got $88 million to spare, you can buy Jeffrey Epstein’s Upper East Side mansion. If you’ve got an additional $2 million, you should invest in enough bleach to clean the house. (6sqft)

What’s a carriage house? An explanation on the short, but wide homes with large interior spaces you may see dotted around the city. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Attention America: Costco still does not trust you with sheet cakes. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Congrats to Brett Gardener for becoming the 18th player in history to appear in 1,500 career games with the Yankees. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

“The gathering there got smaller and smaller, was less and less about protests. More and more, it became an area where homeless folks are gathering,” said the mayor, defending the dismantling of Abolition Park while simultaneously erasing the city’s homeless population’s participation in protests. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Citing an “alarming lack of direction” in the city’s plans for reopening school buildings, a Sept. 10 start date seems increasingly difficult to achieve, according to a letter sent by the head of the union that represents school administrators this week. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The State Senate passed a bill that would mandate the 24/7 operation of the city’s subways unless a state of emergency is in effect, finally giving us an answer if 24/7 would ever come back. Next stop: The Assembly. (Devin Gannon for 6qft)

The pandemic has hit the city’s arts organizations to the tune of $550 million, according to NYC’s Department of Cultural Affairs, SMU DataArts, and Americans for Arts. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

More than a dozen New York City Councilmembers are already asking for Albany’s support in canceling state math and reading tests for third-to-eighth graders this upcoming school year. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The federal government will allow New Yorkers back into trusted traveler programs after federal lawyers admitted that Homeland Security officials made false statements in a bid to justify expelling New York residents from programs that let United States travelers speed through borders and airport lines. Another lie from the Trump administration. (Ed Shanahan with Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

MLB is expanding its postseason to 16 teams, giving four third-place teams a spot in the playoffs. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Tenement Museum laid off 76 part-time workers. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

A look at the Billion Oyster Project’s latest effort, shipping containers turned oyster farms using discarded shells from restaurants, to restore 100 million oysters into the New York Harbor a year. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

How will baseball games deal with rain delays in a shortened season? If it starts raining, the game’s over. The Yankees won a five-inning game last night to kick off their 2020 season. (NY1)

City Council Member Brad Lander is calling on the city to close streets to use them for outdoor instruction for the city’s schools. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

The Times used the right word when describing the exodus of tourists from the city: “flushed.” Will they come back? (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Long Island City. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Stacy for today’s featured photo from the Elizabeth Street Garden.

The Briefly for July 22, 2020 – The “$400 Million Extra in Overtime” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A guide to Governors Island, the state’s legislature sets an agenda for its summer session, where to heat outside in the East Village, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 88˚
Possible rain in the evening.

What to expect when you’re expecting the state legislature’s summer session to start soon. In focus will be nursing homes, automatic voter registration, redistricting, contract tracing privacy, and more. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

Following the June 23 primary and election, State Assemblymember Jeffrey Dinowitz is pushing legislation that would extend the state’s relaxed absentee voting rules until January 2022, which is the earliest the state’s constitution could be amended. (Norwood News)

What’s open, what’s closed, what to eat, and what to wear (a mask). A guide to Government Island. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A Queens man claimed NYPD officers beat him, twice Tased him, and yanked out one of his dreadlocks, according to a federal police brutality lawsuit. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD pledged to cut overtime by $335 million in an attempt to cut its budget by $1 billion. Instead, they are predicted to overspend on overtime by $400 million by the Independent Budget Office. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Our absentee voting mess is giving the White House ammo against main-in voting. Great. (Daniel Marans for HuffPost)

12 ways to picnic in Tompkins Square Park. (Rob Patronite for Grub Street)

New York Attorney General Letitia James along with 23 other Democratic attorney generals are suing the Trump administration to stop a new rule that removes non-discrimination protections against LGBTQ people when it comes to health care and health insurance, which is set to take effect in mid-August. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for QNS)

The latest Black Lives Matter / Blue Lives Matter protest clash happened in Marine Park in Brooklyn, but this time there were words exchanged without violence. (amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The new take-out only Smorgasburg. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A woman was found floating in the East River on Monday night with no signs of trauma on her body. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Jonathan Rodriguez was the second person arrested in connection with the death of Richard Hamlet, whose body was discovered wrapped in plastic atop a Bronx McDonald’s last week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If it didn’t fully set in the other day, the F train will be shutting down on nights and weekends for eight months starting in August. Ruining subway reliability? Now THAT is how we start feeling normal again. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Is it possible that the Mets’ deal with Jed Lowrie is the worst in the franchise’s history? The Mets started paying him $20 million a year last year, he’s made eight plate appearances, was injured for the rest of the season and is already on the injured list. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

In an attempt to “resolve problems outside the court system,” Mayor de Blasio announced a mediation project for the city to work with landlords and tenants. Renters will receive legal assistance and advice to negotiate with landlords. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

After 21 years, radical bookstore, cafe, and activist center Bluestockings is looking for a new home. The bookstore is being pushed from the location by their landlord’s demands for higher rent. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Interview: Storm King Art Center’s Director of Facilities Mike Seaman on what it takes to maintain Storm King year round, keeping it a beautiful place that everyone is already tired of seeing your photos of on Instagram. (Luna Shyr for Atlas Obscura)

The closing Fairway grocery stores in Red Hook and Douglaston, Queens will become Food Bazaar stores. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Rooftop Films is back to create a summer movie drive-in theater in Flushing Meadows Park. It started on Friday night with John Lewis: Good Trouble, which was a few hours before the news of Lewis’s beath became public. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

Interview: Melba’s restaurant’s Melba Wilson on the future of NYC restaurants. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

M.I.A. and Brik Bar in Astoria and Maspeth Pizza House in Maspeth have all had their liquor licenses revoked. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden will reopen on August 7. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Meet Street Riders NYC, the mobile protest movement with over 60,000 among its ranks. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Wear your damn mask on the subway. That’s the message of the MTA’s Mask Force, an arm of “Operation Respect.” (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Upper East Side for Black Lives Matter has held 50 consecutive nights of vigils in Charles Schurz Park. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Black Tap is selling its Instagram-ready milkshakes to-go for the first time. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

I don’t know a single person who would say that the COVID-19 pandemic has been easy to get through, but as a disabled New Yorker, it came with extra challenges and stressors. Politicians talked about the importance of protecting the elderly but failed to mention disabled people as if we didn’t exist. Do you know what it’s like to be erased during a pandemic?
-Michele Kaplan, disability rights advocate, Disability and dignity in the age of COVID-19 for amNewyork Metro

From Tuesday to Saturday from 12-4 pm and 5-9 pm at Lincoln Center until August 1, Lincoln Center will be playing music in the Josie Robertson Plaza, the initiative is being called Sounds of Lincoln Center. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

Riders are up on the city’s buses, but speeds are down. New York City is healing herself. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Someone is using Republican Assemblymember and congressional candidate Nicole Malliotakis’s name to talk shit about the mayor and governor on flyers in Bay Ridge. Malliotakis says someone is trying to defame her by putting up the flyers. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Councilmember Donovan Richards won the Queens borough president primary and will go on to the general election in November to likely become the first Black man elected to the office. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

Interview: Joycelyn Taylor, candidate for NYC mayor is 2021.(Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Photos: As the summer heat cooks the city, the city is no longer just living through the pandemic, we’re living with it. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Where to eat outside in the East Village. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from a recent Bowery walk!