The Briefly for September 9, 2019 – The “Attacked by a Metal Banjo” Edition

New York’s new license plates have been chosen, a new tomato plant grows on the East River, the Port Authority’s new bus depot comes up short, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This week’s late-night subway service change lottery losers are the 3, 4, 6, A, F, N, and Q trains. And always the L train. (Subway Weekender)

This is our new license plate. (Patch)

For the people who loved the tomato plant discovered along the East River, here’s some good news: there is another. (NY Times)

The Charging Bull was attacked with a metal banjo. (NY Times)

It’s a nasty cycle. Bus service degrades to a point where walking will get you where you need to be faster. As a result of the poor service, ridership declines. The MTA doesn’t see the cause, just the effect, and along routes like the B38 and B54, they cut service to match the lowered demand. Now with the degraded service, the buses are still slow, still unreliable and now there are less of them. The MTA can’t fix the problems with the buses because that’s the Department of Transportation’s street designs and the NYPD’s lack of enforcement of what can make traffic flow easily and keep the streets safe for vehicles pedestrians and cyclists. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Friends (The worst show to celebrate in the age of Trump) experience pop-up on Mercer Street is all sold out, so some photos of the inside are all you’ll get unless more tickets become available. (Gothamist)

Bill de Blasio’s campaign for president hopefully ends on October 1st and someone should throw a party in celebration, especially if it means the mayor will stop doing things like show up on Tucker Carlson’s show looking for anyone who will support him. (Gothamist)

277 people leave New York for good every day, making it the #1 city people want to leave in the country. (Bloomberg)

Here comes fall, which means here comes food festivals. (6sqft)

The Apple cube is back on 5th Ave, and it’s trippy as hell. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority presented some of its ideas to replace the Port Authority Bus Terminal, and none of them accommodated services like Megabus, which use the sidewalks of midtown for their pickups and dropoffs, into their plans. There was worry that the Port Authority would eventually screw up replacing the bus terminal, and they are already meeting expectations. (Gothamist)

Digging in on bad ideas is now a hallmark of the mayor’s public statements. (Streetsblog)

Here are this week’s restaurants shut down by the Department of Health, including Tasty Popcorn Chicken in Queens with a whopping 121 violation points. (Patch)

New Yorkers already received over 1.25 billion robocalls this year. (Patch)

The 5 Boro Pizza Challenge is an attempt to eat a slice of pizza in every borough in one day, only using public transportation. Think you have what it takes? (6sqft)

Take a look inside Bette Midler’s $50 million penthouse, which is for sale. (Curbed)

New York will soon get more Detroit-style pizza when Michigan chain Jet’s Pizza sets up its first outpost on Ninth Ave between 17th and 18th St. (Eater)

Last Thursday set the record for the most Citi Bike rides in a day with 90,000. (Streetsblog)

The historic boardwalk in Coney Island is landmarked, but still bears scars from Superstorm Sandy. If you walk west on the boardwalk, past the amusement zone, you’ll encounter a section of plywood boards that freeze over in the winter. You’ll see nails sticking up, you’ll see missing boards, plants growing through, and other hazards. Residents are sick of it and are demanding change. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The governor is flirting with the idea of holding the 2020 New York presidential primaries to February, one day after the Iowa caucuses. (NY Times)

Texting while crossing the street is safe, according to a new study by the Department of Transportation. Remember this the next time some old fuddy-duddy tries to argue otherwise. (NY Times)

Joe Namath is selling his (empty) $1.19 Upper West Side duplex. (I Love the Upper West Side)

There are more hate crimes against black people in NYC this year, but there were more arrests in cases with hate crimes against white people, according to numbers released by the NYPD. (Patch)

A look at five new restaurants in the city. (amNY)

A Times Square Elmo was arrested for groping a teenage girl. (Pix 11)

The history of Central Park’s Shakespeare Garden. (Ephemeral New York)

15 places to try when the company is picking up the tab for lunch. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 30, 2019 – The “Never-Ending DA Election is Going to Court” Edition

Where rents are rising and falling, the top binge drinking neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the governor changes pot possession laws, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Members of The Proud Boys, a hate group according to the SPLC, are headed to trial for rioting for their fights with antifa protestors from an Upper East Side event in October. They’be being charged with rioting rather than assault because the antifa members who were involved are not cooperating with the NYPD. (NY Times)

Dave Chang has a new restaurant in the South Street Seaport. Is Bar Wayō enough to make you want to go to the financial district or will the neighborhood continue to be I Am Legend after 6:00? (Grub Street)

The New York City Board of Elections unanimously certified the results of the full, manual recount in the race for the Democratic nomination for Queens District Attorney. Melinda Katz won the primary. (Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán and Melinda Katz’s campaigns will head to court on Wednesday to continue the June 25 Democratic primary until the bitter end. (NY Times)

Brooklyn Heights/Fort Greene and Park Slope/Carroll Gardens are the current kings of Kings County binge drinking, which also happen to be the two wealthiest districts in the borough. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is public shaming enough to get NYC to change the name of “Negro Point,” which is a real spot on Randall’s Island? (Huff Post)

A $24 million dollar offer for his four-story building in the Upper East Side, denied. The story of one man who refuses to sell out in an attempt to preserve a neighborhood he perceives to be disappearing. (NY Times)

Hail seitan! Brooklyn is getting the first fully vegan sandwich shop in Seitan’s Helper at Precious Metal. (Bushwick Daily)

In an attempt to make the waiting experience less boring, the Empire State Building has a new gallery that is part Instagram-bait and part waiting area. (amNY)

Congressperson Yvette Clark introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology from public housing. Face, voice, fingerprint and DNA identification tech would be banned from any housing that receives federal aid. (Curbed)

What’s in a name like Stone Street, Waverly Place, or Gold St? The hidden history behind 15 street names in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The South Bronx, Concourse Village, and Brownsville are the neighborhoods with the fastest rising rents. The biggest drops were in Maspeth (post-Amazon related?) and Borough Park. (Patch)

If you don’t know the name Sam Rudy, you know his work. His 40 years as a theater publicist included recent work on shows like Hamilton and Avenue Q. The Times interviewed him as he retires to Pennsylvania. (NY Times)

The Williamsburg Bayside Oil Depot is scheduled to be demolished. What’s that? Yes, of course, there is someone arguing that they should be saved. (6sqft)

The governor signed the bill into law that changes possession of up to two ounces of pot to a violation instead of a misdemeanor, meaning you’ll be fined instead of sent to jail. It also creates a process for records of certain charges of possession to be expunged. (Patch)

When he was 26, Carmine Cataldo thought his job running the newsstand at the Brooklyn Supreme Court was temporary. 36 years later, he’s retiring. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to the Rockaways. Start planning your weekend. (6sqft)

It’s not summer until the nutcracker vendors hit the beaches. Unfortunately, the NYPD is attempting to change that in Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

People of color were significantly underrepresented in the city’s arts organizations and city government is starting to ask them to find ways to change. (NY Times)

The president signed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund into law, providing financial support through 2090 to those injured or developed diseases due to their work after the attacks. (amNY)

Unsurprisingly, Trump made the signing of the bill about himself, continuing his history lying and exploitation of the 9/11 attacksthe city’s 18th cyclist killed by a driver. Em was doored by a driver and sent into the street where she was hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

After the killing of Em Samolewicz, here is the city’s most dangerous intersections. (Curbed)

A palate cleanser. Three baby ducks were rescued from a sewer drain in Park Slope after being spooked by a dog. The ducks are recovering at the Sean Casey Animal Rescue. (Gothamist)

Emily Waters is giving away her art on Instagram. Meet the artist who is trying to assuage the constant stress of life with delight. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd “identified a flawed connection between some of the sensors and protective relays” which caused the July 13 blackout in Manhattan. (amNY)

The best museums in the city. (Thrillist)

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