The Briefly for July 18, 2019 – The “Act Like a Summer Goth to Stay Cool” Edition

There have been two additional ConEd blackouts this week, will electric scooters raise real estate prices, hidden bookstores, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the landlords challenging the new rent reforms. (The Real Deal)

Did you know you can see pieces of the Berlin Wall in the city? There’s a piece in an office building, another in Ripley’s Believe It Or Not, another on the Intrepid, but three sections stand together in the United Nations’ garden. (Untapped Cities)

The mayor is “jaded” over ConEd. This follows the Staten Island outage, the Upper West Side outage and a third reported outage in Coney Island all in the same week. He urged New Yorkers to set air conditioners at 78 to help lighten the load for everyone. (amNY)

We have entered the stages of a heat emergency across the city. The official advice is that if you don’t have to be outside or in the sun, pretend you’re a goth teen and stay indoors. If you don’t have air conditioning, the city has 500 cooling centers you have access to. (Curbed)

El Chapo was sentenced to life in prison, putting his career in crime and also the woes caused by his constant crossing of the Brooklyn Bridge to travel between prison and the courthouse under police escort, to an end. (NY Times)

Here’s a map of the city’s cooling centers. (6sqft)

The night that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldren stepped foot on the moon, there was a viewing party in Central Park. The “Moon-In” showed just how moon-crazy the city had gotten. (6sqft)

Nothing quite like a rush-hour breakdown of MetroCard machines to really instill confidence that the MTA will get the OMNY contactless payment right. The MetroCard systems stopped accepting credit cards and the MTA’s Twitter account announced the issue five minutes after it was fixed. Great job all around. (Patch)

When the plastic bag ban takes hold, it only pertains to grocery and big-box stores. Some advocates say it doesn’t go far enough, but the city will feel the collective pain together in March. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The story of BK Yoga Club, an inclusive, body-positive yoga studio in Dumbo, run by Alicia Ferguson and Paris Alexandra. (Bushwick Daily)

The city firefighter that was arrested last month for being caught on video seemingly trying to run over a cyclist is back on the job following his one-month suspension. Further disciplinary action may follow. (Streetsblog)

The top ten hidden bookstores in the city. (Untapped Cities)

This seems like a great weekend to have brunch reservations in order to minimize the amount of time spent waiting for a table outside. 30 great brunch spots that take reservations. (The Infatuation)

Take a look inside Pomander Walk with this house for same, the exclusive 1920s Tudor-style gated community on the Upper West Side. For a bit over $2 million, it can be yours. (6sqft)

The chief business officer at the electric scooter company Lime was boasting that access to electric scooters means more access to bikes and scooters would mean the city would become more accessible, which raise real estate prices. Is that an argument for or against scooters? (The Real Deal)

Seen a bunch of Waldos around the city today? There’s a reason for that. (amNY)

The Time Out Market food hall had its doors shut by the Department of Health after it failed a restaurant inspection and hasn’t re-opened since. They are working to address the issues pointed out by their 102 point violation before they can reopen. (Brooklyn Paper)

At this point, nothing the mayor says or does should be able to disappoint us, but he keeps finding new ways to do instill a feeling of malaise to anyone who hears him speaking. The latest eye-roll comes from calls to have Officer Daniel Pantaleo fired for his role in Eric Garner’s death. (NY Times)

Gossip Girl is already being rebooted. (Huff Post)

There have been at least eight ICE raids across the city in the last five days. Do not open your doors for law enforcement if they do not have the proper paperwork to compel you. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

20 standout restaurants and bars in Prospect Heights. (Eater)

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The Briefly for July 17, 2019 – The “At This Point, Why Not Wait for Christmas?” Edition

CitiBike’s expansion, the best happy hours, the most expensive neighborhood, the government will not bring a case against Daniel Pantaleo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

New York City had a monorail, if only for a moment. Visitors to the 1964 World’s Fair were able to see the grounds in a 4000 foot looped monorail that was disassembled when the fair closed. Support pylons can still be seen in the ground in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. (Untapped Cities)

Who are Jeff Bezos’s new neighbors? Let’s find out. There’s a list at the end of the article if you want to skip down to it. (The Real Deal)

We have a winner, a Christmas tree being thrown out on July 16. (EV Grieve)

48 people were arrested while blocking traffic at 5th Ave and 42nd on Tuesday while protesting President Trump’s continued threat of ICE raids. (amNY)

Just finished anoter re-watch of Seinfeld and looking for a meal? If you want that classic diner experience, Queens is your borough. (QNS)

If you’ve wanted to take an up-close look at one of Tom Fruin’s Kolonihavehus glass mosaic water towers that are dotted around the city, one is on display inside The Shops at Hudson Yards. (Untapped Cities)

ConEd is celebrating turning the power back on in Manhattan with a victory tour of telling the public “sometimes blackouts happen in heatwaves.” Very reassuring. (6sqft)

The federal government will not bring charges for Daniel Pantaleo over the death of Eric Garner. NYPD Commissioner is the arbiter of Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial, which the police administrative judge has not yet rendered a verdict. “The D.O.J. has failed us,” -Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr (NY Times)

The Department of Transportation’s “Safer Cycling” report in 2017 identified eight priority zones with insufficient bike infrastructure and deadly crashes. Since these areas were identified, the number of injuries in the priority zones have risen by 6.5%. (Streetsblog)

The driver of a box truck hit a cyclist in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue. The cyclist was either unconscious or unresponsive before being taken to Methodist hospital. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into why drivers and pedestrians seem to hate bicyclists. (Gothamist)

CitiBike officially unveiled their plans for expansion into the Bronx Ridgewood, Upper Manhattan, and deeper into Brooklyn. It’ll be a while for some neighborhoods with the expansion scheduled through 2023. (6sqft)

We The Commuters is celebrating Bike Week with a list of biking clubs across the city where the intimidation factor is low and the “we won’t leave you behind” factor is high. (Gothamist)

The play-on-words named Dig Inn has decided to change its name to questionable and no longer punny Dig. They argue “Dig has become more than a restaurant,” to which I argue “restaurants have table service.” (@diginn on Medium)

What to do in a power outage. These are practical tips, this isn’t a guide to entertain yourself. (StreetEasy)

Levain Bakery added a “secret” ice cream sandwich menu item, so if you’re looking to impress your friends who aren’t subscribers to The Briefly, this is your moment. (Gothamist)

A list of the dates where the L train is shut down overnights at ten stations throughout Brooklyn in July, August, September, October, and January. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for six weekends of partial to non-service as switches are replaced. (Curbed)

“My mother at Lincoln Towers at 69th and West End has no power also.” The New York Times published their Slack transcripts from the night of the blackout, because why not? (NY Times)

A farewell to Dean & Deluca. (Grub Street)

Giselle Burgess, the founder of the first troop designed for homeless girls in NYC Girl Scout Troop 6000, was elected to the board of directors of The Child Center of NY. (QNS)

As expected, two real estate trade groups have brought a constitutional challenge against the state’s rent reforms. Historically the Supreme Court has uphelf rent regulations. (NY Times)

Tribeca remains #1 in the city when it comes to home prices, with the median sale price in Q2 of 2019 being $4.34 million. The only neighborhood that comes close is Hudson Yards with $3.86 million. (6sqft)

Williamsburg has the more cases of the measles than any other neighborhood, but the list is 9 neighborhoods long and the total measles count rose by 1 in July to 623. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Tips for eating out in NYC with food allergies. (amNY)

The city’s “Nostalgia Ride” which goes from 96th St to Coney Island along the Q line in a 1917 BMT train will happen this Saturday. Be patient, the ride takes about two hours. (amNY)

Waitress will close on Broadway in January of 2020. (NY Times)

How much trash is on our beaches? Well, Parley for Oceans, the Department of Sanitations official non-profit group, with 170 volunteers picked up 1,200 pounds of trash from Rockaway Beach in two hours. (Gothamist)

The top happy hours in 25 neighborhoods. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “Poison Ivy is Growing All Over the City” Edition

Photos and highlights from the USWNT’s ticker-tape parade, Citi Bike is failing NYers of color and the poor, WORD’s summer reading list, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Here’s an overview of where the Queens DA race is at the moment. (amNY)

The governor has a bill on his desk that can end the Cabán/Katz election lawsuit. Why hasn’t he signed it? (NY Times)

The state passed rent reform, but that’s no reason to let your guard down. Here are four new ways that landlords will try to raise your rent. (Gothamist)

The city started to make good on a promise made 15 years ago to bring a park to Downtown Brooklyn. The first portion of Willoughby Square Park is open to the public on the corner of Gold and Duffield. (Curbed)

Can you identify poison ivy? No? Here’s a primer, since apparently, it grows all over the city. (Gothamist)

The oldest 13 restaurants in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Adda, Atomix, and Kopitiam are now on Eater’s best new restaurants in America list. (Eater)

Photos from the World Cup USWNT Parade. (amNY)

Team captain Megan Rapinoe’s speech was full of hope and ended with a truism: “New York City, you’re the motherfucking best!” (Huff Post)

The glorious signs at the parade. (Huff Post)

If you’ve still got soccer fever, here’s a list of new or soon-to-be-built soccer fields across the city. (Localize Labs)

A history of ticker-tape parades. (6sqft)

RIP Michael Seidenberg, owner of Brazenhead Books, an Upper West Side speakeasy bookstore that held late-night salons. (Untapped Cities)

Congrats are in store to the first Trailblazers Awards from the Brooklyn Cannabiz Collective, honoring people of color who are pioneers in the cannabis industry. (Brooklyn Paper)

What’s on your summer reading list? Here’s an offering from WORD Bookstore. (Brooklyn Based)

The city announced a decrease in the size of the community jails planned as a replacement for Rikers Island. (amNY)

Activists disrupted the meetings to shout down Deputy Director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice Dana Kaplan’s testimony. (Patch)

MAMACHA café was known for it’s CBD infused drinks, snacks, and soft-serve ice cream. Unsurprisingly, it closed the same day the city’s CBD-food and drink ban was put into place. (Bedford + Bowery)

A new contract agreement between pre-K teachers and the city will bring them one step closer to pay parity with the rest of the city’s teachers, bumping up the salaries of some Community Based Organization (CBO) teachers by $20,000. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Dave Chappelle is Dave Chappelle, even when he’s on Broadway. Of course, he’s gonna stir up some controversy. (BrooklynVegan)

A new report shows that Citi Bike is failing to include New Yorkers of color and the poor. The median household income of people who lives close to a Citi Bike dock is $90,400, while the median household income of someone is $54,700. The report calls for Citi Bike to expand into 11 specific neighborhoods with “high social vulnerability.” (Curbed)

Camp Junior, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is open this summer after a two-year renovation. The camp is open for 9-to-13-year-olds from neighborhoods in the Bronx with a risk of gang activity. (Patch)

Dean & Deluca owes small businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars for providing the chain with cookies, bread, pastries, and etc and will be closing stores in an attempt to stay in business. (NY Times)

This year’s Summer Streets dates have been announced. Get ready to take over Park Ave on three Sundays in August. (Viewing NYC)

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s artist-in-residence program has selected this year’s artists. E, Jane, Elliot Reed, and Naudline Pierre. The group show from the previous cohort is up at MoMA PS1, which will also host next year’s edition. (NY Times)

How to spend a day in the Rockaways. (NY Times)

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