The Briefly for May 17, 2019 – The “The Mayor is Bored of New York and Hates Being Mayor” Edition

Broad coverage of our mayor’s inadvisable run for president, the best beach day trips, Corey Johnson’s criminal justice reforms, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subways don’t look any worse than normal, with some diversions for the Brooklyn Marathon on Saturday. The 1, 3, J, and A trains all terminate early (no trains to Rockaway Beach, only buses and ferries). (Subway changes)

The best beach day trips from NYC. (6sqft)

“A former top aide for De Blasio told me this is exactly right: He is utterly bored and hates being mayor. He doesn’t expect to win but he just wants to get out of NYC.” (@eisingerj)

Ugh, he’s running for president. (NY Times)

The mayor’s campaign video, featuring him being chauffeured around the city in an SUV, had a theme of “working people first.” (Splinter)

The New York Times actually found someone who vocally supports the mayor’s presidential bid, which means she is one of the 25% of New Yorkers that aren’t opposed to him running. (NY Times)

The video alsofeatures the Brooklyn Promenade, the area the mayor proposed tearing down and replacing with a temporary six-lane highway. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Meet Dean Fuleihan, the city’s deputy and de facto mayor when ours decides that he’s bored fo the city and wants to leave. (NY Times)

Streetsblog has the right idea. With his presidential run, it is time for the mayor to resign. (Streetsblog)

It’s good to remember that the mayor has no control over the subways, and according to the Citizens Budget Commission if he did, it would be “too much pressure” and “miserable.” (Streetsblog)

Mayor de Blasio hasn’t even resigned out of boredom yet and Corey Johnson just earned his first endorsement for mayor. (City and State NY)

Corey Johnson announced on Thursday a package of proposals aimed at reforming New York City’s criminal justice system to be more fair and equitable, building on changes championed by progressive politicians and advocates in New York and Albany over the last several years. (Gotham Gazette)

The most splurge-worthy city restaurants, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

Forest Hills and Riverdale topped the list of the best neighborhoods for first-time buyers. (Curbed)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

Gothamist tested the lead levels in various parks around the city, and you’re not gonna be thrilled with the results. Especially if you go to the Prospect Park Bandshell. (Gothamist)

“Everything” you need to know about eating and drinking at the TWA Hotel. (Grub Street)

A look at a vintage map of the mall at the World Trade Center pre-2001. (Viewing NYC)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer is calling for free abortion care for all people who can’t afford it. He’s seeking $250,000 out of the city’s $92.5 billion proposed budget for the New York Abortion Access Fund. People with VA coverage or federal workers cannot use their medical insurance for abortion care and this would also cover visitors and tourists as well. (Gothamist)

Time to hit Tinder on W 72nd St. Seven summer date ideas on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The state’s legislature is ready to force the MTA to install elevators at any subway station undergoing a closure or renovation that would last at least six months. The bill is targeted at the MTA’s “Enhanced Station Initiative” which has been closing stations across the city for changes that are considered largely cosmetic. (amNY)

“Where can bad bitches on vacay dine ‘Sex and the City’ style?’ Blass Kayla Kumari Upadhaya, who actually answered this reader question for Eater. (Eater)

Take a look at the new renderings of Penn Station’s new main entrance. (Curbed)

I. M. Pei passed away at 102 on Thursday, but the city still bears the famed architect’s fingerprint. (Curbed)

The best happy hours in Manhattan. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 13, 2019 – The “The Thing Is, I’m Not Sorry” Edition

The mayor announces the city will work more closely with ICE, CitiBike’s electric bikes aren’t coming back until the fall, these kittens need adopting, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes hit the 4, 6, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains. (Subway Changes)

It’s been seven years since Hurricane Sandy and the city has only spent 54% of the $14.7 billion in the federal aid set aside for recovery. City Comptroller Scott Stringer blames federal bureaucracy but also puts blame on City Hall’s lack of urgency to protect itself against the next storm. (Curbed)

The Times is getting in on the de Blasio anti-endorsement train. (NY Times)

10 quiet places to escape the city’s noises. (Untapped Cities)

A look back to Bertha Heyman, a swindler of men in New York from the 1880s. Even from prison, she swindled a man out of his life’s savings. (Atlas Obscura)

Anna Sorokin, from prison, said she’d be “lying to you and to everyone else and to myself if I said I was sorry for anything.” Maybe the next step is conning someone out of their life’s savings. (NY Times)

A walk through Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market is an exercise in bathing yourself in the chaotic glow of multiple colors and shapes of neon lights which has a distinct “city” feel. The Times looks back with photos at when neon lights shone with hope and glamour and gave New York and Times Square a visual identity. (NY Times)

Are you ready for a summer of floating LED billboards at city beaches? (Gothamist)

Some of us love birds but don’t have the patience for bird watching. Maybe that’s part of the Central Park Mandarin Duck’s appeal. If you can’t be bothered with finding the hot duck, there’s Nicolas Holiber’s Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project, which is bringing ten sculptures of native NY birds in danger of going extinct to the medians of Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA’s 7 Train work is completed, with the trains programmed for optimal cruising speed and increases the number of trains per hour during peak service from 25-27 to 29. (Sunnyside Post)

The first electric unicycle explosion happened near Union Square, which started a two-alarm fire. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including a triple-digit violation, which really takes effort. (Patch)

22 bars where you can actually find a seat. (The Infatuation)

This year’s NYC Century Bike Tour will be the last. Transportation Alternatives’ strategy has changed over the last 30 years and so has riding a bicycle in the city. With about 10% of all New Yorkers riding a bike several times a month, biking no longer needs to be established as a legitimate form of transportation. (Streetsblog)

“The vast, vast majority of undocumented people in this city know their city government is protecting them, respecting them, supporting them.” Mayor de Blasio announced the city will be working even more closely cooperate with ICE. (Patch)

A guide to all of the reasons that the mayor is running for president, like being habitually late, he gets driven to the gym on a daily basis to avoid taking the train, and… no one can make this guy look like a viable candidate. (Gothamist)

16 of the coolest hotel pools in the city, including some open to the public. (Curbed)

Imagine the terror of one million New Yorkers moving on the same day. That day used to be May 1 when almost all of the city’s leases were up. Imagine the equivalent of a million New Yorkers all moving on the same day. (CityMetric)

Where to go drinking with your dog on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

One of the most prolific members of the online white supremacist community was ID’d as 30-year-old Flushing resident Joseph Jordan, according to an investigation from the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center. (Gothamist)

The governor is calling for investigations into possible widespread fraud at the MTA over the misreporting of overtime. If you’re looking for a blow-by-blow of politicians, transit officials, and labor representatives pointing fingers and shift blame, there was an “emergency” MTA board meeting where labor representatives and Governor Cuomo’s MTA appointees pointed fingers, shifted blame, and of course, got nothing accomplished. (amNY & Second Ave Sagas)

It’s the start of kitten season in the city, which means the ASPCA is expecting 1,500 kittens from May to October. They are looking for people willing to foster kittens and offers training, food, supplies, and support. Plus “I’m fostering kittens right now” will look very good on your Tinder profile. (Gothamist)

Video: Peter Wallker dissects preconceived notions about the dangers of “cyclists.” (The Guardian)

Something must be seriously screwed up with CitiBike’s pedal-assisted bikes. They were pulled from the streets in April for a problem with the brakes and they won’t be seen again until the fall. (Streetsblog)

Meet the NYCHA plumber that earned over $200,000 in overtime last year. (The City)

The city’s top 14 burgers, from The Daily Meal’s list of the best 101 in the nation. (Patch)

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The Briefly for May 1, 2019 – The “Wouldn’t We All Love to Ban Tour Guides With Groups” Edition

ApplePay comes to the MTA this summer, Tony Award nominations are in, the Dept of Education is accused of failing to protect students from sexual assault, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The mayor’s “Turning the Tide on the Homeless” program is facing criticism in a new report from the Coalition for the Homeless. The city’s homeless population has grown by 10% for each year Mayor de Blasio has been in office. January was a record-breaking year for the number of men, women, and children spending each night in a shelter at 64,000. (Gothamist)

The list of Tony nominations are in. This year’s big winner is “Hadestown” with 14 nominations. (NY Times)

A new lawsuit filed this week accuses the NYC Department of Education of failing to protect students against sexual assaults, file official complaints, conduct proper investigations, and support survivors dealing with trauma. Legal Services NYC filed the lawsuit on behalf of four girls aged 12 to 18. (Gothamist)

The National Park Service took an action on Liberty Island that most of us wish we could take anywhere we need to go: banned tour guides. (NY Times)

The Essex Market opened in 1940 at the behest of Mayor Fiorello Laguardia. This May the market’s original location closes to move across the street. (Untapped Cities)

“The one that I almost leapt over the counter to get was a quesadilla panino.” Eater’s weekly sandwich column from Robert Sietsema got a bit intense. (Eater)

Coney Island is getting another music venue, located in the center of the Coney Island Art Walls. “Amuse” will have a capacity of 4,000 and have programming between Memorial and Labor Day. (Gothamist)

If you’re looking to make an appreciable change in the city, the charter review process is your opportunity. (Curbed)

Was the body found under the Verrazzano Bridge an NYC Marathon runner? The body under the Verrazzano was one of two bodies found in the city’s waters last weekend. (Gothamist)

An Absolut Ban. An executive order from the mayor put the kibosh on newsstands, bus shelters, and LinkNYC alcohol ads, sponsorship or branding. The city doesn’t expect to lose any revenue as a result of the ban. (Patch)

What’s going on with the hundreds of “unfounded” rape cases in Queens? The 14.2% of reported rapes in Queens being unfounded is significantly higher than the city’s other boroughs. (QNS)

The problem with the city’s plan to divert L train riders to the J and M trains is that the J and M trains are just as reliable as they’ve ever been. Overnight Monday a switch problem brought both train lines to a halt, effectively turning the L train slowdown into a full-on East River shutdown. (Gothamist)

Today is the anniversary of the Empire State Building’s opening in 1931. A piece of trivia to unlease on unsuspecting people in your life. (GVSHP)

Speaking of trivia… tonight’s the night for JOHN TRVIALTA at Parklife:

Amazon is still coming to Queens but in the form of a new distribution center in Woodside. (The City)

Bronx Councilmember Andy King was accused of sexual harassment for the second time in two years. King is refusing to cooperate with the City Council. (Patch)

Billionaires’ Row is missing something significant. Billionaires. Nearly half of the apartments are unsold, including some buildings seven years old that remain half empty. (Curbed)

Take a look, because there are new renderings of Brooklyn’s Wegmans. (6sqft)

The Queens Library got a six-month extension on their Court Square lease to remain in the building through March 31, 2020. (LIC Post)

The NYPD found a new way to make biking or walking over the Brooklyn Bridge a nightmare. (Streetsblog)

What’s that tree outside your building? There’s a map for that. The New York City Street Tree Map is the world’s most accurate and detailed map of a city’s street trees. (Viewing NYC)

The art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

Nomiki Konst is under fire for questionable practices and payments during her Public Advocate campaign and is accused of being a “plan from the right.” You’d be forgiven if you couldn’t remember her or her campaign, she only garnered 2% of the vote. Konst’s campaign manager came forward about questionable donations, which were publicly matched, and even more questionable invoices. Konst has attempted to distance herself from the potential scandal, but she served as her own treasurer, which makes her legally responsible for her campaign’s financial system. (Politico)

Soon your apartment may be powered by poop! No, we’re not talking about your roommate. (Gothamist)

An appellate court upheld the city’s measles vaccination mandate on Monday, denying a request for a temporary restraining order by a group of anti-vaxxer parents as the number of confirmed cases in New York City rose to 423. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With all the measles talk going around, you’re not alone if you’re wondering if you should get yourself a booster shot as an adult. (NY Times)

Story update. Remember how the Board of Elections put all the city’s voter rolls online for anyone to look at? Well, that’s over. The BOE realized that maybe posting all of our names, addresses and party affiliations online wasn’t the best idea. (NY Times)

The MTA will begin support for ApplePay in the “early summer,” as the OMNY system is scheduled to go live on some 4, 5, and 6 train stops on May 31. (Engadget)

The latest city landmark debate is over Tin Pan Alley, the birthplace of popular music. The conversation made a surprising turn towards some of the racism expressed in songs created there. (Curbed)

The “NOT GONNA SUCK YOUR DICK” graffiti tag is getting attention. (Bowery Boogie)

Featured walk: The essential Upper West Side. (GoRoam)

Where to go if you want to eat a burger at the bar by yourself. (The Infatuation)

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