The Briefly for September 4, 2019 – The “11-Hour Mayoral Work Month” Edition

The measles epidemic is over, the mayor’s community jails idea moves forward, the 20 best burgers, Cuomo’s license plate vote might have been rigged, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A hippo ballerina. Crawling from Greenwich Village to Union Square. The midnight moment. 20 new public art installations not to miss in September. (Untapped Cities)

From Bushwick to the Bronx. The best urban farms in NYC. (Curbed)

Mayor Bill de Blasio spent 11 hours working in City Hall in May. (MSN)

Mayor de Blasio declared the measles epidemic over. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This week, the parents of 26,000 kids in New York state face a decision: Get your kids vaccinated or get them out of school. (NY Times)

Okay, so you’ve stepped in a giant street puddle wearing flip-flops. What’s next? (Curbed)

Congrats New York, we’re the 9th worst US city to drive in. (Patch)

Was Governor Cuomo’s NY license place voting rigged in favor of the Cuomo bridge design? (NY Times)

Whoops, Cuomo’s push to ban fusion voting might violate the state’s constitution. (Gothamist)

Korey Johnson was charged with murder and manslaughter for the alleged killing of a man who attempted to break into his car. (Gothamist)

A 3-year-old boy was hit and killed by a 73-year-old driver in Far Rockaway on Monday morning. The driver of the car stayed at the scene and no arrests were made and the investigation is ongoing. (amNY)

With 1,103, Bushwick will see the most new apartments of any neighborhood in the city in 2019. Jamaica and Astoria are in 2nd and 4th with less than half of the number of Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

Of the city’s 1,840 public schools, 244 are exposed to high levels of pollutants from nearby highways. One future consideration for a school’s ranking may be the risk of long-term cardiovascular disease to the students. (Curbed)

As of 1:30 on Monday, there was a Popeye’s in Manhattan with about 10 chicken sandwiches left. Good luck. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio’s community jails idea was approved by the New York City Planning Commission, despite an entire room of protestors. The plan goes to city council next for a vote. (Patch)

A long feature on the wizard rock band Harry and the Potters concert at the Knitting Factory in Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Here’s a $27-a-night Airbnb in Brooklyn that is a literal closet under a set of stairs. Yup, the Harry Potter room. (Insider)

“The Lehman Trilogy,” a play based on the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers, is headed to Broadway for sixteen weeks in 2020. (NY Times)

The Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes is officially open. Part of their work will be to encourage New Yorkers to report hate crimes, so an increase in reports in the future won’t mean they aren’t doing their jobs. (Patch)

If you found $9,000 on the train, would you return it to its owner? (amNY)

The 20 best burgers in New York City. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Judith for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for August 21, 2019 – The “Bragging About Being Better Than Queens” Edition

Two Proud Boys are convicted, Cuomo bans floating billboards, the city’s secret waterfalls, the Ritz-Carlton penthouse is for sale, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

What are your neighbors complaining about the most? (The Real Deal)

The latest exhibit at the Transit Museum focuses on the history of subway signs. (Untapped Cities)

Have you been indoctrinated into the cult of cauliflower gnocchi? (Grub Street)

Nothing is as Brooklyn as bragging about being better than Queens. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: The abandoned Miller Air Field in Staten Island. (Untapped Cities)

Manero’s Pizza has stepped into the city’s pizza battles with a hybrid New York/Neapolitan slice. (Grub Street)

It’s not a pre-snowstorm run on food, this disaster is the modern-day Dean & Deluca’s. (Eater)

A guide to $1 happy hour oysters, the holy grail, in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The safest neighborhoods in the city. (StreeyEasy)

Wayla vs Wayan vs Wayo. Getting the restaurant names straight in the city isn’t as always simple. (Eater)

Following the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, activists have named five additional officers who they say should be fired for their connection to the death of Eric Garner. (Politico)

New York joined the lawsuit against the federal government over the finalized changes to the “public charge” rule, which will deny citizenship, visas, and green cards to immigrants enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (amNY)

July was the tenth hottest month in NYC history. (Gothamist)

Where to find the city’s secret waterfalls. (6sqft)

Not on the list is the Marcy Houses, where tenants were battling a waterfall in their stairwell due to a burst pipe. (Patch)

The mayor has claimed victory in reforming the NYPD, but the reality isn’t as simple. (Gotham Gazette)

The AirTrain to JFK will be increasing in price from $5 to $7.75 starting November 1. (Second Ave Sagas)

The digital billboards that have been floating around Manhattan are illegal as of Monday, when Governor Cuomo signed a bill to law making them immediately illegal. The company behind the billboards has vowed to find a new loophole to continue their annoying goal of making sure New Yorkers are always looking at advertising somewhere. (NY Times)

Everyone is prone to make real estate mistakes, but not everyone writes an essay for Domino Magazine about it, but then again Lena Dunham isn’t everyone. (Domino)

Vendors could be banned from the Dyker Heights Christmas lights displays this year because of the volume of trash visitors left lying around in previous years. New Yorkers are renown for disposing of their garbage anywhere they’d like, and a neighborhood that’s residential through most of the year isn’t meant to hold the trash of 150,000 visitors. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed to address the homelessness crisis in his last mayoral campaign, but critics say his plans are falling short. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo signed the “Deed Theft Bill” into law, which provides greater protections for owners of homes that are in default or foreclosure. (Kings County Politics)

Does the opening of the Brooklyn Grange, the city’s largest rooftop farm, signal a real change for the city? (Brooklyn Based)

Maxwell Hare, 27, and John Kinsman, 39, guilty of attempted gang assault, attempted assault, and rioting as part of the Proud Boys fight on the Upper East Side in October of last year. They’ll be sentenced in October and face up to 15 years in prison. (Gothamist)

The best new restaurants on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The ultimate guide to renting in NYC. (Curbed)

If you’ve got $49 million and a burning desire to live in the Ritz-Carlton’s penthouse, I’ve got an apartment to sell you. (The Real Deal)

The PlayStation Theater in Times Square will be closing January 1. The last shows at the theater will be a four-night run by the Disco Biscuits. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Nike York City? The city agreed to license its logo and a few dozen other ephemera to Nike to print them on its merchandise. Does anyone want an NYPD Bomb Squad sneaker? (Patch)

Here are the companies in NYC with the fastest revenue growth. (Patch)

Whatever a “classic NYC experience” is, amNY has a list of restaurants where you can still experience it. (amNY)

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)