The Briefly for September 4, 2019 – The “11-Hour Mayoral Work Month” Edition

The measles epidemic is over, the mayor’s community jails idea moves forward, the 20 best burgers, Cuomo’s license plate vote might have been rigged, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A hippo ballerina. Crawling from Greenwich Village to Union Square. The midnight moment. 20 new public art installations not to miss in September. (Untapped Cities)

From Bushwick to the Bronx. The best urban farms in NYC. (Curbed)

Mayor Bill de Blasio spent 11 hours working in City Hall in May. (MSN)

Mayor de Blasio declared the measles epidemic over. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This week, the parents of 26,000 kids in New York state face a decision: Get your kids vaccinated or get them out of school. (NY Times)

Okay, so you’ve stepped in a giant street puddle wearing flip-flops. What’s next? (Curbed)

Congrats New York, we’re the 9th worst US city to drive in. (Patch)

Was Governor Cuomo’s NY license place voting rigged in favor of the Cuomo bridge design? (NY Times)

Whoops, Cuomo’s push to ban fusion voting might violate the state’s constitution. (Gothamist)

Korey Johnson was charged with murder and manslaughter for the alleged killing of a man who attempted to break into his car. (Gothamist)

A 3-year-old boy was hit and killed by a 73-year-old driver in Far Rockaway on Monday morning. The driver of the car stayed at the scene and no arrests were made and the investigation is ongoing. (amNY)

With 1,103, Bushwick will see the most new apartments of any neighborhood in the city in 2019. Jamaica and Astoria are in 2nd and 4th with less than half of the number of Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

Of the city’s 1,840 public schools, 244 are exposed to high levels of pollutants from nearby highways. One future consideration for a school’s ranking may be the risk of long-term cardiovascular disease to the students. (Curbed)

As of 1:30 on Monday, there was a Popeye’s in Manhattan with about 10 chicken sandwiches left. Good luck. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio’s community jails idea was approved by the New York City Planning Commission, despite an entire room of protestors. The plan goes to city council next for a vote. (Patch)

A long feature on the wizard rock band Harry and the Potters concert at the Knitting Factory in Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Here’s a $27-a-night Airbnb in Brooklyn that is a literal closet under a set of stairs. Yup, the Harry Potter room. (Insider)

“The Lehman Trilogy,” a play based on the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers, is headed to Broadway for sixteen weeks in 2020. (NY Times)

The Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes is officially open. Part of their work will be to encourage New Yorkers to report hate crimes, so an increase in reports in the future won’t mean they aren’t doing their jobs. (Patch)

If you found $9,000 on the train, would you return it to its owner? (amNY)

The 20 best burgers in New York City. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Judith for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for August 26, 2019 – The “This Comes With A $10k Toilet” Edition

The US Open owes $300,000 in rent, Corey johnson writes for food access, New York’s red flag gun law goes into place, new restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Monday means another week of late-night subway changes and disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Public Library’s Hunters Point branch is opening on September 24, after 4 years of construction. (Curbed)

All the big tech companies in the city, mapped. (The Real Deal)

Would you expect anything less than a $10,000 toilet in a $29 million home? (Architectural Digest)

The U.S. Open generates more than $750 million per year in “direct economic impact” to New York City and employs over 7,000 people each, but it also owes the city $300,000 in rent. (amNY)

Welcome to the weirdest office in the city. (Untapped Cities)

New York’s “red flag” gun bill went into effect over the weekend, which allows removal of their guns if a family member, law enforcement officer or educator successfully petitions the court. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Pacific Park, which was previously named Atlantic Yards, is the epicenter of the latest city vs state battle. The state gave approval for a massive underground gym to be added to the development and local officials are outraged that no concessions were made, especially since the developers are already behind in their commitment to creating affordable housing. (Brooklyn Paper)

Via for Schools will give parents and students the ability to track their bus’ locations in realtime. Last year thousands of kids experiencing multi-hour bus rides home from school. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court upheld a rule that bans for-hire vehicles like Uber and Lyfts from having ads inside and on top of the vehicle.

New York’s license plates are changing, but the way they’re made will not be. License plates are made by prisoners earning $0.65/hour at the Auburn Correctional Facility. (Gothamist)

There have been no new measles cases reported in August and with the number stopped at 654, this may signal the end fo the measles outbreak that started in September 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Department of Corrections at Rikers Island cannot legally put an 18 – 21-year-old in solitary confinement, but that doesn’t mean they haven’t found a new form of extreme isolation, this one without any restrictions. (Gothamist)

The Spotted Pig has been in trouble since owner Ken Friedman was accused of groping his female staffers and other sexual misconduct. Foot traffic is down because a declining number of people want to support a business owned by that kind of monster. Now, with foot traffic and revenue down, Ken Friedman sees the writing on the wall and is open to selling. (Eater)

Here are the buildings in the city with the most elevator complaints. (Curbed)

She’s been making breakfast on the city’s streets for over 35 years. Meet the woman behind Mama Jo’s Breakfast Cart and self-proclaimed oldest street vendor in New York City, Mama Jo. (Viewing NYC)

You may not be invited over to Meryl Streep’s townhouse, but you can see what it looks like on the inside through this $18.25 million real estate listing. (Curbed)

It’s late August and someone on the corner of First Ave and third Street just put their Christmas tree on the curb. Amazing. (EV Grieve)

Photos from the Official Animal Rights March. (EV Grieve)

6 ways to celebrate National Dog Day in New York City. (amNY)

Be careful with your children and dogs in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Morningside Park. Deadly, toxic algae blooms have been found in all three parks. The Prospect Park Dog Beach is still safe. These blooms are likely side-effects of the recent, intense rains which have been linked to climate change. (NY Times)

A look back at Mayor David Dinkins, 30 years after his historic 1989 election to become the first black mayor of New York City. (Gotham Gazette)

Corey Johnson’s latest op-ed argues that access to adequate, nutritious food is a human right. (Chelsea Now)

7 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to Leah Bassity for today’s featured image.

The Briefly for June 20, 2019 – The “Legal Marijuana is a Dead Cause in New York State” Edition

NY1 is hit with an age and gender discrimination lawsuit, the electric scooter and ebike bill passed, most Ricky’s locations are closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Port Authority’s plan to build an AirTrain to LaGuardia has one key flaw: the MTA. Comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that states the MTA simply isn’t ready, to no one’s surprise. (amNY)

It’ll be hard to go anywhere in the city towards the end of the month without spotting a rainbow flag. NYC & Co released a list of the buildings across all boroughs that will be lit with rainbows and their schedules. Some, like City Hall, will be lit from June 10 – 30, while some like Bloomberg’s Headquarters and MSG will be lit on June 30. (Curbed)

Five anchorwomen are suing NY1 for age and gender discrimination. The lawsuit betrays the image NY1 wants the city to believe. While Pat Kiernan’s 20th anniversary with the channel was celebrated on-air, while Roma Torre’s 25th anniversary was marked by nothing. Ms. Torre’s salary also happens to be half of Mr. Kiernan’s. (NY Times)

Legal marijuana is dead for this legislative session. According to Liz Krueger, the state senator who sponsored the bill, they “ran out of time.” (Gothamist)

The reimagining of Penn Station has begun with new entrances on 7th Ave. (Untapped Cities)

Did you know that subway elevator attendants still exist? The elevator ride at the St. Nicolas Ave station rides the same 181-foot route all night, non-stop. Gothamist rode shotgun for a full overnight shift. (Gothamist)

The Culinary Institute of America is starting an Anthony Bourdain scholarship. (Grub Street)

Following up on that “beach” Battery Park photo from earlier this week, meet Brian Shea, the master planner of Battery Park City. (Untapped Cities)

Ricky’s may be closing their NYC stores with the exception of two. Even the city’s innovator when it comes to wigs, hair dye, sex toys, makeup and more isn’t immune to the Amazon effect. (Jezebel)

17 tourist trap restaurants that are actually good. (Eater)

Get out into the world. That’s the advice from Wigstock founder Lady Bunny, who worries that the LGBTQ community is abandoning their safe spaces in favor of social media. (amNY)

10 essential tools every apartment should have. Time to hit your neighborhood hardware store. (StreetEasy)

Would it surprise you to learn that a confusing bar slash “>bar slash vegetarian restaurant was also a late night dance club is in Bushwick? (Gothamist)

If you met Giblet on the street in the East Village, you’d know. Giblet is a friendly, one-year-old pig that seems to melt everyone who sees it’s heart. (Bedford + Bowery)

Jennifer Lopez an Alex Rodriguez sold the apartment where A-Rod’s viral toilet photo was taken. They have since purchased blinds. (Curbed)

There were hundreds of summonses issued during the city’s crackdown on measles, but only one fine issued and that fine was the result of someone who skipped their hearing. (Gothamist)

The next artist to head for a Broadway residency is Regina Spektor. (amNY)

An argument for why Brooklynites should be voting for surrogate judges on June 25. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to Tuesday’s Queens DA election. (Gothamist)

Does any New Yorker not have nightmares about an air conditioner falling on them in the sidewalk? Even if there’s only one record of a falling air conditioner in the last five years, you should be following directions putting that thing in your window. (Patch)

The legislature passed a bill to remove the electric scooter and bike ban, but don’t celebrate just yet. The city still has to write its own rules and regulations before they’re completely legal to ride. (Mashable)

Once the police and Walmart show up to support your cause, can you still claim to be part of the counter-culture? The Pride March is often criticized for the priority given to corporations, the party atmosphere, and police involvement. This is where the Reclaim Pride Coalition’s Queer Liberation March steps in, promising an attitude similar to the original Pride March. The Queer Liberation March happens 9am on the day of the Pride March and has banned floats, corporate involvement, and asked for minimal NYPD involvement with no barricades to allow people to join and leave the protest at will. The Pride March bans anyone from spontaneously joining. (NY Times)

Okay, so you’re in Downtown Brooklyn and, honestly, it can be difficult to know what the hell there is to do around there outside of walk around. Here’s a guide of what to do and eat. (amNY)

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