The Briefly for May 21, 2020 – The “Is This Guy A Complete Idiot?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city struggles to keep yeshivas closed, 19 organizations helping essential workers, 10 lesser-known picnic spots, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.

More and more, people are waking up to the realization that whatever the city looks like after this is all over, it doesn’t have to be what it was before this started. Manhattan President Gale Brewer wants an expanded Street Seats program and less parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

“Do you have reservations? No? Please leave.” Is reservations only the future of restaurants? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Is Dr. Mitchell Katz, the head of the city’s public hospital system and also the city’s tracing system for Covid-19, a delusional idiot? He made mention that everyone should do what he did to help his ailing parents and just find an apartment in your building to put her in instead of a nursing home. Everyone has the ability to do that, right? Just pay for another apartment and also maybe hire a caretaker. What do you mean he’s making $700,000 and you’re not? Just get a $700,000 a year job and then you’re all set. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It looks like Michael Cohen may serve the rest of his prison sentence at home thanks to an early release over Covid-19 concerns. (Benjamin Weiser, Katie Benner and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is planning a mid-August reopening “or perhaps a few weeks later,” which is a lot of wiggle room. Whenever they reopen, the rest of the year will have additional social distancing requirements with the hope that things can be relaxed sometime in 2021, when the Met Gala might also return. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The city’s politicians and advocacy groups are beginning to share one message to the mayor, and that is when we open up, we have to stop using streets for cars and let businesses and people take over the streets. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

19 organizations helping essential workers in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The NYPD dispursed three yeshivas that had illegally opened up for classes and gatherings on Wednesday and were issued “polite warnings.” The mayor was pushed about this on Inside City Hall with Errol Louis, who asked him if he had “some kind of political understanding with the leaders of the Orthodox community that there would basically be no enforcement around this?” The mayor insisted they are receiving no special treatment, despite multiple pieces of evidence that gatherings are happening regularly. Let’s not forget that the mayor’s wife has aspirations of running for Brooklyn borough president. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Child vaccination rates plummeted 63% as Covid-19 spread across New York City. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City landmarks will be lit up green tonight in honor of the parks workers. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The 10 best lesser-known spots for a lovely NYC picnic. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Monty for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 17, 2020 – The “Every Hour is Happy Hour When Time is Meaningless” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city’s budget goes wartime, the best brunch options for delivery, high end stores are boarding up their windows, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 51˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 41˚ High: 63˚

4K VIdeo: Walking through Times Square. (ActionKid)

In honor of his late grandmother, Michael Che will be paying May’s rent for the 160 apartments in the NYCHA building where she lived. (Ron Dicker for HuffPost)

Rent in the city dropped 6% since the start since March 22. (Localize.City)

Tenant groups are set for a rent strike on May 1. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Sick of sourdough? Here are seven bread options for you to try. (Sam O’Brien for Atlas Obscura)

The allure and anxiety of drinking along in quarantine. (Alice Feriring for Grub Street)

What time is it okay to start drinking alcohol? It’s hard to tell because time has no meaning anymore. (Shayla Love for VICE)

Slowly, the city’s government is finding a way to move forward. The City Council and the Landmarks Preservation Commission will start meeting digitally next week. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Taxi drivers were struggling before the pandemic. With COVID-19, they face even more difficulties. (Estefania Hernandez for NY1)

Are you willing to go to a live sport without a vaccine? 61% of sports fans and 71% of people overall are unwilling to go until there’s a vaccine. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Keith McNally’s Lucky Strike on Grand Street is closed for good. Is it the first domino to fall when it comes to independent restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

From former Roberta’s and Speedy Romeo chef Robert Guimond comes Public Display of Affection, a wood-fired pizza spot in Park Slope on Union Street. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio released a revised “wartime” budget on Thursday, with a $6 billion reduction. “A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor when speaking about his budget. Last year he said, “Placard abuse erodes faith in government and has no place in our city.” This year he’s eliminating the Placard Abuse Enforcement Team. Activist Charles Komanoff has a different idea: Disband the Collision Investigation Squad instead. (Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog)

Workers at two luxury Manhattan residential buildings, The Chamberlain and 432 West 52nd Street, walked out on the job, claiming poor work conditions and harassment. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

It’s easy to think that artists should use this time to create something new, but the reality of the moment can be much heavier than imaginable. This is Rori Nogee’s story of going from having six jobs and a show ready to open on Restaurant Row to a 100% loss of income and opportunities. (Rori Nogee for New York Cliche)

A look at what might be New York City’s last open bookstore. (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

I first saw it from a friend’s story on Instagram, the boarded-up stores in Manhattan. It’s a pandemic, not The Purge. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Pizza bagels? Pizza rolls? Please. Forget it, now pizza cupcakes are ready for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Tired of the same old views? Check out the livestreams of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“It should be stated bluntly that traveling on the New York subway system is now one of the more frightful experiences Western civilization has to offer on a regular basis. The experience is not only intolerable. It is also a daily advertisement for the brutish sensibilities and shallow brainpans of the people who now control the city.” “Why We Hate the Subways,” despite being timely, was written in 1977. (Alexander Cockburn for Village Voice)

Thank goodness for people like the non-profit Greenpoint Cats, who have been doing their best to look after bodega cats left behind or abandoned as bodegas close. (Aaron Simon for Greenpointers)

10 great sandwiches still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found floating in the East River near Roosevelt Island. (Emily Davenpont for QNS)

New York remains on PAUSE until at least May 15. (Kathleen Culliton for PAtch)

Reports of domestic violence have dropped dramatically across the city, and that’s not a good thing. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

Watch New Yorkers sing “New York, New York” out their windows after Thursday’s 7 pm clap, a project of the Peace of Heart Choir. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In what started as a cheap way to live, an $800-a-month illegal bedroom in Bushwick with no windows now sounds more like a cruel experiment. (Trey Taylor for Curbed)

Do you miss Shake Shack? Here’s the recipe for the ShackBurger and ShackSauce. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The best brunch options in NYC available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for April 19, 2019 – The “Mayor of New York City and Candyland” Edition

The city fines parents and shuts down schools for measles, quiet places to read the Mueller Report, cuffing season is over, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What fresh hell does the weekend bring us on the subways? Literally no G train, partial shutdowns or diversions on the 1, 4, F, J, N, Q, and of course more. (Subway Changes)

The Mueller Report is out, download the report and find one of 21 of the best quiet places to read in New York City. (Harpers Bazaar)

If you’ll need more than just a quiet space, here are 17 places you can take in the report and alcohol. (The Infatuation)

The mayor was directly confronted with statistics and facts showing he is wrong about electric bikes and still chooses to live in Candyland where what he thinks becomes everyone else’s reality. (Streetsblog)

The city shut down four schools (they shut down a school earlier this week) and fined three sets of parents for violating the city’s measles vaccination mandate. (amNY)

The anti-vaccination parents who sought to lift New York City’s new measles vaccination mandate via lawsuit have failed. A state judge rejected the lawsuit. (HuffPost)

From the “men will eventually ruin this” files: Brooklyn’s first female and non-binary powerlifting gym opened in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The latest explainer of congestion pricing. We’ll be seeing these until 2021 when congestion pricing takes hold. (Gothamist)

13 dishes that show it’s a boom time for ribs in NYC. (Grub Street)

It’s springtime, are you ready to step out? (NY Times)

The Times takes a look at the city’s opulent bank buildings, which have found new life in a world ruled by ATMS. (NY Times)

Looking around the Lower East Side, it’s easy to forget the 90 years that ended in 2015 when the Streitz matzo factory pumped out nearly 30,000 pounds of the unleavened bread every day leading up to Passover. (Bowery Boogie)

Three businesses built around reducing waste. Take note, because paper bags are gonna cost you a nickel in 2020. (amNY)

It’s like a piece of IKEA furniture, but instead, it’s a 360-foot-tall hotel. (The Real Deal)

A story of multiple headlines:
Did New York City’s Population Fall? Yes. And No. (NY Times)
People Are Fleeing NYC In Droves, Census Figures Show (Patch)
Oh No, NYC’s Population Has Dropped Ever So Slightly, Whatever Shall We Do With The Tiny Sliver Of Extra Space? (Gothamist)
Can you figure out which one of these headlines is clickbait?

The DOT unveiled its plan to help our slowest-in-the-nation buses improve their speeds by 25%, including protected lanes, separated lanes, and pedestrian safety improvements. Changes are scheduled to happen starting this year. (Streetsblog)

No, you can’t sue the MTA for bad service. Turns out the MTA has literally never promised good service. (Gothamist)

11 landmarks of immigration in Greenwich Village. (6sqft)

So the man arrested trying to bring canisters of gas and lighter fluid into St. Patrick’s Cathedral had a one-way ticket to Rome and had been arrested for refusing to leave a Catholic church in New Jersey last week. (CNN)

Death metal busking on the subway? * guttural approval intensifies * (Gothamist)

The mayor violated ethics rules by courting developers for donations for his now-defunct nonprofit Campaign for One New York. (Curbed)

20 standout Financial District bars and restaurants. (Eater)

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