The Briefly for September 4, 2019 – The “11-Hour Mayoral Work Month” Edition

The measles epidemic is over, the mayor’s community jails idea moves forward, the 20 best burgers, Cuomo’s license plate vote might have been rigged, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A hippo ballerina. Crawling from Greenwich Village to Union Square. The midnight moment. 20 new public art installations not to miss in September. (Untapped Cities)

From Bushwick to the Bronx. The best urban farms in NYC. (Curbed)

Mayor Bill de Blasio spent 11 hours working in City Hall in May. (MSN)

Mayor de Blasio declared the measles epidemic over. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This week, the parents of 26,000 kids in New York state face a decision: Get your kids vaccinated or get them out of school. (NY Times)

Okay, so you’ve stepped in a giant street puddle wearing flip-flops. What’s next? (Curbed)

Congrats New York, we’re the 9th worst US city to drive in. (Patch)

Was Governor Cuomo’s NY license place voting rigged in favor of the Cuomo bridge design? (NY Times)

Whoops, Cuomo’s push to ban fusion voting might violate the state’s constitution. (Gothamist)

Korey Johnson was charged with murder and manslaughter for the alleged killing of a man who attempted to break into his car. (Gothamist)

A 3-year-old boy was hit and killed by a 73-year-old driver in Far Rockaway on Monday morning. The driver of the car stayed at the scene and no arrests were made and the investigation is ongoing. (amNY)

With 1,103, Bushwick will see the most new apartments of any neighborhood in the city in 2019. Jamaica and Astoria are in 2nd and 4th with less than half of the number of Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

Of the city’s 1,840 public schools, 244 are exposed to high levels of pollutants from nearby highways. One future consideration for a school’s ranking may be the risk of long-term cardiovascular disease to the students. (Curbed)

As of 1:30 on Monday, there was a Popeye’s in Manhattan with about 10 chicken sandwiches left. Good luck. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio’s community jails idea was approved by the New York City Planning Commission, despite an entire room of protestors. The plan goes to city council next for a vote. (Patch)

A long feature on the wizard rock band Harry and the Potters concert at the Knitting Factory in Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Here’s a $27-a-night Airbnb in Brooklyn that is a literal closet under a set of stairs. Yup, the Harry Potter room. (Insider)

“The Lehman Trilogy,” a play based on the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers, is headed to Broadway for sixteen weeks in 2020. (NY Times)

The Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes is officially open. Part of their work will be to encourage New Yorkers to report hate crimes, so an increase in reports in the future won’t mean they aren’t doing their jobs. (Patch)

If you found $9,000 on the train, would you return it to its owner? (amNY)

The 20 best burgers in New York City. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Judith for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for August 27, 2019 – The “End the Gifted Programs to Desegregate the City’s Schools” Edition

This winter will be a tough one, a ghost kitchen haunts Soho, the 7 train destroys a morning commute, officials want answers about the BQE and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Why can’t New York be a modern city? The answer lies in the billion-dollar fiefdoms controlled by city and state agencies and can be illustrated by a simple dog walk. (New York Mag)

Another person was killed by a driver on Coney Island Avenue. A 40-year-old man was lying on the sidewalk near a parking garage when he was run over by someone pulling into the garage a little after midnight on Monday. This is the fourth person killed on or near Coney Island Avenue this year. (Streetsblog)

This week marks the 243rd anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn, the first battle of the Revolutionary War. Ten spots to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn. (Untapped Cities)

A panel of experts has a recommendation on how to end segregation in the city’s schools: close all the gifted programs. (NY Times)

If you’re someone who keeps a spreadsheet of the best food in Chinatown (I know more than one person who does this), strike Yee Li, formerly New Big Wang, from the list. After 33 years on the corner of Elizabeth and Bayard, the restaurant is closed but lives on in spirit at the family’s new restaurant, New Yee Li, on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Brooklyn.

Surprise! A broken rail on the 7 train ruined Monday morning’s commute on the 7, E, M, F and R trains. (Gothamist)

Photos and more photos from Afropunk (Gothamist and Brooklyn Vegan)

If you’re wondering what’s going on with the replacement of the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade, you’re not alone. Multiple city and federal officials signed onto a letter looking for answers from the Department of Transportation. (Curbed)

A ghost kitchen is coming to Soho. Zuul, literally named after Zuul the Gatekeeper of Gozer from Ghostbusters, will house multiple restaurants who will only offer delivery. Sweetgreen, Junzi, Sarge’s, Naya, Stone Bridge Pizza & Salad, and POsitive Foods have already signed on. There is no restaurant, only Zuul. (Eater)

The Farmers’ Almanac has made their predictions for winter 2020 and you’re really gonna hate this. “With colder-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast and above-normal precipitation expected, our outlook forewarns of not only a good amount of snow, but also a wintry mix of rain and sleet—especially along the coast.” They are also predicting an extended winter and a slow start to spring. (Patch)

Today is PSL day in Starbucks across the country, but get ready for the Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew, the latest abomination destined for success. (Grub Street)

The Kosciuszko Bridge will open on Thursday, four years ahead of schedule, and bring with it pedestrian and bike lanes. (Curbed)

A state Supreme Court Judge upheld the state’s ban on religious exemptions to vaccinations for all children in public or private schools, put in place after the measles outbreak this year. The plaintiffs plan to appeal the decision. (Gothamist)

Arthur Schwartz, the lawyer leading the legal arguments against the 14th St busway who likened people protesting him to “white hooded zealots,” has compared Jane Jacobs’ fight in the ’60s against Robert Moses to his fight against “our millennial version of Robert Moses” Polly Trottenberg. Trottenberg, who graduated from Barnard College in 1986 and is not a millennial. (The Villager)

Statues for Equality by Gillie and Marc bring statues of ten women to Sixth Avenue on the anniversary of women getting the right to vote. (Untapped Cities)

Despite the president’s tweet that the federal government is working to extend the Q train to 125th St, nothing has been done by the Trump administration to prove his words remotely true. (6sqft)

Why do some buildings allow roof access and some do not? (Street Easy)

The overall number of overdose deaths in the city is down, but the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan all saw increases. Rates are down among black and white New Yorkers but are up among Latinos. (amNY)

Taylor Swift’s “Cornelia Street” on her new album mentions the townhouse she rented in Greenwich Village. Take a look inside. (Curbed)

Would you believe that the NYPD Detective Darryl Schwartz, who is being sued for allegedly making bogus DWI arrests in order to earn extra overtime, has a history of misconduct? (Gothamist)

Anyerson Delacruz-Rosario was arrested in the Dominican Republic for his part in trafficking hundreds of thousands of packets of heroin and fentanyl to New York City. (Patch)

The lawsuit against the Central Park West bike lane appears to be in jeopardy as the building who filed the suit is facing internal challenges against it and possibly violated state law with the filing. (Streetsblog)

A tribute to the 99 cent pizza slice in the form of a new mural by City Kitty. (EV Grieve)

The best lunch spots in Midtown. (Thrillist)

Thanks to Baily Crawford (@blycrawford) for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 14, 2019 – The “A Plan To Save Us All From the Sea” Edition

The religious exemption for vaccines is ending, a ball-pit bar is coming to Brooklyn, the weekend subway service changes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This is the end of the religious exemption from vaccines in New York state. The legislature agreed on a bill and the governor has said he would sign it to prevent future public health crises similar to the current measles outbreak. (NY Times)

It’s the weekend, so usual “check the subways before you go anywhere” rules apply. (Subway Weekender)

Get to know your Queens District Attorney candidates. (Queens Crap)

Jon Stewart, New York’s collective voice, had a heck of a week. It opened with shaming Congress, which resulted in moving the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund moving forward, and ended with an extremely personal gift from some grateful firefighters. (Gothamist)

The United States Army Corps of Engineers released a series of plans to save New York from when the sea rises up to eat us. Each of the proposals will cost billions of dollars and would dramatically change the city’s coastline. A plan will be selected either later this year or early next year. The plans range from a 25-year construction that would cost over $100 billion to nine years and cost about $15 billion. (Curbed)

The park at Essex Crossing in the Lower East Side is now open. (6sqft)

A 4-alarm fire broke out in Midwood that injured twelve and spread through three houses and was caught on fire. Three firefighters were among the twelve. (Gothamist)

Sometimes justice moves slowly. Elizabeth Lederer, the lead prosecutor in the Central Park Five case, will not return as a lecturer at Columbia Law School after the release of Netflix’s “When They See Us.” (amNY)

Here are the important points of info you need to know about the new rent reform package. (Gothamist)

There’s more to Coney Island than Nathan’s and Totonno’s. 9 places to eat in Coney Island, but honestly, all you need to know is Dona Zita. (Eater)

The 11234 zip code, where you can find Bergen Beach, Mill Basin and Flatlands, has more baby boomers than any other zipcode in the United States. The city has 14 of the top 20 zip codes for boomers, with the city holding the top four spots. (Patch)

The old Coffee Shop in Union Square is going to become a Chase Bank. (Gothamist)

There’s an office tower in Manhattan unfortunately named “Penn15.” (The Real Deal)

Where to eat a last minute dinner in the East Village. (The Infatuation)

The people in the city’s homeless shelters are treated like numbers and the employees of the Department of Homeless Services appears to be abusing “emergency” transfers to move people around for seemingly no reason. (NY Times)

Is El Museo del Barrio turning its back on the local Latinx community? The Mirror Manifesto, an open letter signed by artists, was read while protestors occupied the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. (Gothamist)

Starting July 1, the NYPD will take a different tact with people who are homeless on the subway and commit minor infractions. Instead of a summons, they will be sent to a detox facility, shelter, or to get other kinds of help as needed. The purpose of the pilot program is to divert people away from the court system and to work to minimize subway disruptions, which had tripled in the last few years. (Patch)

Remember the most expensive apartment in the city? The one that came with two tickets two space, a yacht, two full-time servants, and a bevy of other amenities that seemed too good to be true? Turns out it was a fake and a marketing tactic for the building. The listing was a combination of about a dozen different apartments on the 45th floor. (Curbed)

What’s the best time of year to look for an apartment in the city? StreetEasy broke it down neighborhood by neighborhood, and we’re heading into the worst time of year for most areas. (Curbed)

It might not be surprising that the neighborhoods with the most excessive airplane noise are in Queens, with Brookville, Howard Beach, and Flushing topping the list. (Localize.Labs)

If you’ve fallen in love with the MTA’s new rainbow transit heart, you can find it on some of the city’s 1 trains and on MetroCards. Five subway trains are sporting the MTA Pride logo and you can get special edition World Pride MetroCards at a few select subway stations. (Gothamist)

The unofficial MTA Pride Train signs are back across the city. (amNY)

Turns out dads can be stay-at-home parents too! Who knew? (amNY)

There’s coffee and then there’s coffee. Sawada, a Tokyo-style cafe, is “one of the most genuinely inspired additions to the New York coffee scene in some time.” (Eater)

The Barclays Center announced a free summer concert series featuring Andy Suzuki & The Method, Nappy Nina and Dj Donwill, DJ Mick, and more. (The Brooklyn Reader)

An analysis from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs indicates that the president’s immigration policies are having a chilling effect on immigrants using SNAP benefits. The rate of non-citizens dropping out of the program is four times higher than citizens dropping out. (NY Times)

Let’s ask the scary questions. How safe is the elevator in your building? (the Real Deal)

Let’s all say farewell to the small superheroes of NYC, with the last season of Jessica Jones closing out The Defenders’ run on Netflix. Daredevil, Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher, and Jessica Jones were New York City’s heroes and the fun game of where was that filmed?” will have to be reserved for re-watches. (amNY)

They don’t make subway stations like they used to. This time it was Atlantic Terminal that saw a crumbling ceiling along the D, N, R tracks. This incident can be attributed to a non-MTA contractor puncturing the ceiling while taking a soil sample above ground, but add it to the list of inconveniences we all absorb on a daily basis. (amNY)

A ball-pit bar is coming to… no not Bushwick, but very close to it. (Gothamist)

Inside the NYPL’s Stonewall exhibition. (Gothamist)

This week in NIMBY news: The homeless shelter on Billionaire’s Row has cleared a legal hurdle but the neighborhood continues to fight against it. (Curbed)

In more NIMBY news, Community Board 2 has overwhelmingly voted against the mayor’s Rikers Island neighborhood replacement. (Brooklyn Paper)

The Grub Street guide to the summer’s “Can’t-Miss” food festivals. (Grub Street)

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