The Briefly for June 5, 2020 – The “Black Lives Matter. Say Their Names.” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: An open letter from the neighborhood around the Barclays Center, the NYC memorial for George Floyd, calling for a repeal of “Walking While Trans,” and more

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 77˚
Rain throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 60˚ High: 82˚

Terrance Floyd, George Floyd’s brother, was in attendance for a memorial service for George Floyd in Cadman Plaza on Thursday afternoon. Speakers included Terrance Floyd, Cirlane McCray. Mayor de Blasio (who was showered with boos and calls for his resignation), Attorney General Letitia James, members of New York’s congressional delegation, and Reverend Kevin McCall. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Photos: Workers from Bellevue Hospital demonstrated and knelt for eight minutes and 46 seconds to honor George Floyd on Thursday, the length of time a Minneapolis police officer knelt on Floyd’s neck to kill him. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Breonna Taylor was killed by a police officer in Louisville, Kentucky in her own home. A Wednesday night protest through Brooklyn was in her name to ensure she is not forgotten in the national Black Lives Matter conversation and her family can achieve the justice they deserve. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

“The incidents that took place over the last several days in the neighborhoods surrounding the Barclays Center in Brooklyn where members of the NYPD showed that they are not capable of de-escalating protest activity without an egregious use of force are inexcusable. As organizations who have committed to ensuring that our neighborhoods remain places where commerce, retail, livability and safety are actualized, we will not settle for harsh policing as the answer — not now, not in our neighborhoods, and not in our City.”
-Hundreds of residents, politicians, and civic organizations that border the Barclays Center, Brooklyn’s central hub for protests, Community Letter to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

There was an 1845 New York law that said it was illegal for two or more people wearing masks or any face covering from congregating in a public place. It was repealed by the state’s legislature. Maybe next time I try to wear my horse mask to watch the Thanksgiving Day parade, I can do so in peace. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The city is allocating $500,000 in grants for Bronx businesses that were recently vandalized and looted, up to $10,000 for each business. The city worked with SOMOS Community Care to help secure funding. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Jamel Floyd, an inmate at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park, died on Wednesday after corrections officers pepper-sprayed him in the face for being disruptive. (Aidan Graham for Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD’s poor handling of protesters doesn’t stop after their done beating them on the streets. Once inside One Police Plaza, arrestees denied due process, held for over 24 hours, and are subjected to increase risks of Covid-19, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Manhattan’s DA Cy Vance wants to hold looting suspects without bail, looking to Governor Cuomo to bypass state laws and calling for more “judicial discretion.” (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The Civilian Complaint Review Board, an independent agency that investigates reports of police misconduct, has logged more than 500 complaints related to the George Floyd protests during six days. (Rose Adams and Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

You can file a complaint of police misconduct to the CCRB online.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has outlined three specificities to accompany his demand that the NYPD’s budget is reduced by $1.1 billion. A hiring freeze and a reduction of police officers to pre-de Blasio numbers (35,000), a 5% cut in overtime, and better disciplining of officers to reduce brutality settlements. When it comes to the settlements, I would assume that the city’s comptroller knows this, but police brutality settlements come from a separate budget than the NYPD’s budget. In 2018 the city paid $237.4 million to settle lawsuits, but that was in addition to the NYPD’s budget. Every settlement that the city has to make with victims of the NYPD’s disgusting acts of violence is additional money they are taking from the city’s budget. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has begun taking bikes from protesters. There have been multiple reports of bikes being confiscated with no paperwork on retrieving them once they are seized. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

“What pressing responsibilities have so occupied these two officials that they do not have the time to make sure the safety of New Yorkers is protected and the rights of New Yorkers are respected? How is it possible that after so many reports of police misconduct, they still can’t be bothered to supervise the police?”
-The New York Times Editorial Board, Mayor de Blasio, Open Your Eyes. The Police Are Out of Control

New York’s Street Vendor Project released a statement in “unconditional solidarity” with the Movement for Black Lives. This may seem like a quizzical statement to report on, but silence in compliance. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Donald Trump Jr has decided that his new target for trolling is City Councilmember Justin Brannan. Good thing he doesn’t have anything better to do. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan for the MTA to reopen on Monday would serve about 8% of riders as 200,000-400,000 will return to work next week. The MTA has installed hand sanitizer dispensers at some stations and is looking to distribute two million face masks to those who need them. The subway will continue to cease overnight operations from 1-5 am. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

How will people stay safe on the subways when returning to work? “I really want to push back on the notion we can solve everything all the time.” -Mayor de Blasio (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Train operators and conductors have recorded the highest number of COVID-19 infections among subway workers, according to internal documents. the MTA had a ban on face masks that was lifted only days before the state went on pause. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Governor Cuomo is urging that between protests, New Yorkers find time for a Covid-19 test. Free Covid-19 tests have been expanded to all New Yorkers. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Dentists offices will reopen for business on Monday. (Robert Pozarycki for Bronx Times)

NYC is on track to start phase one of reopening on Monday. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi endorsed Congressmember Eliot Engel in his primary against Jamaal Bowman, despite Engel being caught on a live mic saying “If I didn’t have a primary, I wouldn’t care,” when asked about vandalism in the Bronx. I would imagine that Pelosi feels a pressure to endorse established Democrats against challengers, but this feels egregious. (Heather Caygle and Sarah Ferris for Politico)

Request an absentee ballot to vote in the June 23 primary before June 16.

A look at Francesca “Sol” Chaney’s Black Supper, a free food program only for Black people who might be protesting nearby or simply need a pick-me-up. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Republican City Councilmember Eric Ulrich (whose website appears to be a dead Squarespace site) is making some big talking about calling for the City Council a vote of no confidence in Mayor de Blasio. In the last few months, he’s also demanded the firing of Commissioner of Health of the City of New York Dr. Oxiris Barbot. He will hit his term limit on the City Council in 2021 and has made multiple failed attempts to be elected to a higher office since his 2009 election. (1010 WINS)

A look at new outdoor art exhibitions coming this summer. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The MTA is calling for 60 miles of bus lanes in all five boroughs for the city’s phase one reopening to ensure that it can get New Yorkers to work. The mayor, a noted coward when it comes to leading, was noncommittal. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

A map of all the subway stations equipped with OMNY readers. (MTAPhotos)

More than 90 organizations signed onto a letter addressed to Governor Andrew Cuomo and other top lawmakers in the state urging them to ensure forthcoming criminal justice packages include repeal of a discriminatory loitering law frequently used by law enforcement to stop, profile, and arrest innocent transgender women of color. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Our libraries are returning, here are their reopening plans. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

An interactive NYC map that shows the closest bit of nature to your home. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

13 NYC restaurants supporting the Black community. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Mike for today’s featured photo of the Geoge Floyd Memorial in Brooklyn!

The Briefly for September 3, 2019 – The “Paying to Sleep in a Van in the East Village” Edition

Cuomo calls for a National Grid alternative, a giraffe corpse found in the water, the Boerum Hill chicken massacre mystery, fall foliage, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Brooklyn Detention Complex will close by the end of the year and its inmates will be transferred to Rikers Island. This is the jail that had a fire in the winter that robbed it of heat for days on end and struggled with the heat during the hottest days of summer. Mayor de Blasio’s community jail plan is set for a vote in city council this month. (The City)

Three illegal Airbnb landlords agreed to a $1 million settlement after making $21.4 million from illegal rentals. Seems like a good deal to me. (Patch)

$85 a night on Airbnb to sleep in a van in the East Village. (Airbnb)

Everyone’s talking about the end of summer, and even though it doesn’t end for three more weeks, here’s a map of when to see peak fall foliage in the city. (Patch)

Meet the Houdini Museum of New York’s 23-year-old director. (amNY)

The top 10 secrets of Madison Square Garden, although “they dress up the backstage area for artists” doesn’t seem like much of a secret. (Untapped Cities)

The restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including 3 restaurants ordered closed after 100+ point violations. (Patch)

The boiler room of the Chelsea Market is now an art space, with ARTECHOUSE taking over the space. The first show is Machine Hallucinations from digital artist Refik Anadol. (Untapped Cities)

The state finished the Kosciuszko Bridge early and the city’s Department of Transportation was caught with their pants down and the bike paths to the bridge weren’t ready. (Curbed)

Did you see the mystery Boerum Hill chicken massacre aftermath video? (Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill has no plans to step down in light of the Police Benevolent Association’s vote of no confidence. (amNY)

If you’re thinking about a new look for the fall, you’re in luck because Cheetos and Forever21 are giving out free Flamin’ Haute Cheeto makeovers on Friday and Saturday. (Time Out)

NYC Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes will open next week. (amNY)

Just in time, they can investigate who vandalized the Silver Gull in Queens with anti-semitic, pro-Nazi, and racist graffiti. (NY Times)

National Grid has been refusing to serve new businesses as a tactic to get their gas pipeline approved by the state and the governor isn’t having it, making public statements that the Department of Public Service should consider alternative franchisees. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD’s leadership is very white. (The City)

This weekend was a particularly violent one when it came to shootings. The NYPD shot and killed a man in Jamaica, Queens who was the suspect in a bodega shooting. (Gothamist)

A shootout with the NYPD in Brownsville, Brooklyn has left a man dead. (amNY)

A shooting in Richmond Hill, Queens left one dead and two seriously injured. (QNS)

Smithsonian Museum Day is coming up on September 21, which means free admission to 30 of the city’s museums if you register in advance. (Time Out)

The Paris Theater, the city’s last single-screen movie theater, is closed. As John Waters comments in this Times piece Where will old art movie fans go to see rarified foreign films in the safety of a rich neighborhood?” (NY Times)

Cars were removed from Central Park last June but traffic signals and lines painted on the streets haven’t been changed, causing chaos and creating a wild atmosphere for pedestrians and cyclists alike. (Streetsblog)

Photos from the Electric Zoo on Randall’s Island. (Gothamist)

How the global diamond trade helped shape the city’s skyline. (The Real Deal)

An SUV driver hit and killed a man he suspected broke into his car on Monday, marking the 21st cyclist to be killed by a driver in the city this year. (Gothamist)

How did a giraffe corpse end up at the bottom of the Lower New York Bay? How about a piano in the Bronx River? These are the mysteries of Underwater New York. (Patch)

Photos from J’Ouvert 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want dinner to feel like going out. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 5, 2019 – The “We’re Headed for a Cabán/Katz Recount” Weekend Edition

The MTA’s weekend subway plans, congrats to Joey Chestnut, our absentee mayor continues to be absentee, Cash Cab is back, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

I hope everyone had a great 4th of July, regardless if you celebrated or not. July 4th was a cause for celebration for The Briefly as well. It’s the one year anniversary of the first email sent by The Briefly. Thank you for being a reader.

You might think of it as a holiday weekend, but the MTA has other plans. 12 subway lines have planned disruptions this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Tiffany Cabán was 1,100 votes ahead of Melinda Katz on election night. As of July 4, she was 20 votes behind. Queens is headed for a manual recount. (NY Times)

More than 2,500 affidavit ballots were rejected and the Cabán campaign will be fighting to have them counted. This is the 2000 presidential election all over again. (Politico)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut on winning his 12th hot dog eating championship, with 71 hot dogs in 10 minutes. In Times Square, that would cost roughly $1,500. (amNY)

Despite what you experienced on July 4th, fireworks and sparklers continue to be illegal in New York. (amNY)

After multiple years and nearly a half billion dollars in renovations, full service on the N train has been restored in Brooklyn. (The City)

The panel of experts overseeing the rehab of the BQE hasn’t made any decisions, but have intimated that the plans the city has put forward, which include replacing the Brooklyn Promenade with a temporary highway, have little chance of being approved. (Brooklyn Paper)

Our mayor, who spent July 4th in Iowa, said “I’m a half-glass-full kind of guy” when it comes to his polling numbers, which are in the toilet. His office in New York, which is been full empty, as he pretends he’s not wasting time and money in Iowa. He missed the funeral for 9/11 responder and NYPD detective Lou Alvarez and failed to preside over the weigh-in for Nathan’s hot dog eating competition, something Mayor Bloomberg did 11 of the 12 years he was mayor. (Gothamist)

26 (kind of obvious, but still a solid list) things to do in the city this summer. (Curbed)

The Central Park bomber has been at-large for three years. (Gothamist)

There are 25 horses in the Prospect Park Stable, and each “manufacture” 75 pounds of poop daily, bringing the total to nearly a daily ton of horseshit. The owner of the stable has begun turning the manure into compost and gifting it to the nonprofit Red Hook Farms. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Got a hankering for strawberries? Here’s a list of where to get yourself a strawberry dessert. (Grub Street)

Bushwick’s The Notorious B.I.G. and Alfred Hitchcock mural was vandalized. A video was taken of the vandal, but they haven’t been found (Bushwick Daily)

Community Board 7 voted to approve a bike lane for Central Park West. The neighborhood will lose 400 parking spots in the process, but the board weighed those parking spots vs the life of Madison Lyden, who died after she was forced from the current bike lane by a parked cab and hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

Eliot Engel, who represents parts of the Bronx, Westchester, and Yonkers in the House of Representatives, is the next New York Democrat to be primaried from the left. His challengers cite is conservative views on Israel, the Middle East, and education among some of the reasons they feel he needs to be challenged. (Politico)

The city’s sheriff arrested Anthony Medina, a debt collector who allegedly scammed on cab drivers by pretending to be a city marshall to harass drivers into giving up their medallions and cabs and occasionally shook them down for cash. (Gothamist)

The East Village’s Mikey Likes It is closed after a tax-related seizure last week. (EV Grieve)

Cash Cab is back and will be filming in NYC this summer. (amNY)

The removal of the citizenship question from the 2020 census is a win for New York, as state Attorney General Letitia James’s office helped lead the charge against it. (Patch)

Four neighborhoods, Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, East New York, and Brownsville account for 23% of the city’s shootings this year. Despite a trend towards less violent crime in the city, shootings and reported rapes citywide have increased this year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Where to eat and what to do at the South Street Seaport. (amNY)

The principal of LaGuardia High School, Dr. Lisa Mars, has stepped down following a sit-in by the students and years of protests by students, teachers, and faculty. A divergence from the school’s mission is what drive the protests and the vote of “no confidence” in May. (Gothamist)

Serial subway groper Giovanni Verdelli has been arrested 70 times and the NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill is calling for his permanent banning from the subways. (Downtown Express)

The ultimate guide to Penn Station. (Curbed)

The man who tossed piss onto two transit workers in April, Brandon Jobson, was arrested and charged with two counts of assault. You’re in trouble, Brandon. (Gothamist)

The entire Brooklyn Congressional delegation called for the firing of Customer and Border Protection officers after posts in a private Facebook group with 9,000 members surfaces with threats to Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and insensitive comments about the ongoing crisis at the United States’ southern border. (Kings County Politics)

Spots for a big group hang outside. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.