The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “A Love Letter to the Salt Bagel” Weekend Edition

Fighting this weekend’s planned ICE raids, more people are staying put in Brooklyn and Queens, the city’s speed camera program starts to expand and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The president’s ICE raids scheduled to take place this weekend have included New York as a target. The governor announced anyone in need of assistance may contact the Liberty Defense Project via the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 or liberty@dos.ny.gov.

What should you do if ICE is at your door or the door of someone you know? Here are the ACLU’s guidelines and outlines of your rights. (ACLU)

The Amazon Web Services Summit at the Javitz Center drew crowds protesting Amazon’s involvement with ICE with their Rekognition Video system. (amNY)

Riding the subway still sucks, but it sucks the least its sucked since 2013, with an on-time performance over 80%. (Curbed)

Check the trains before you venture out this weekend. This is the last weekend of reduced L train service before the multi-week night and weekend partial shutdown starts and remains through January. (Subway Weekender)

R. Kelly was arrested by the NYPD and Homeland Security in Chicago on federal sex trafficking charges and is expected to be brought to New York to face those charges. (NBC New York)

A love letter to the salt bagel. (Eater)

The NYPD claims to have figured out the reason for an uptick of shootings in northern Brooklyn: District Attorney Eric Gonzalez. The NYPD is blaming a program where weapons-possession offenders can plead guilty and take part in an educational program instead of being jailed. Putting the blame on this program has two flaws. The program is a decade old, the uptick in shootings are only in one portion of the borough while the program is borough-wide, and it does not apply to anyone who has used a gun, only those possessing them. (Brooklyn Paper)

Have mannequin, will carpool. A hero from New Jersey was pulled over on the Verrazzano Bridge for trying to using his “friend” as a reason to use the HOV lane. (Gothamist)

The photos your friends post to Instagram from Storm King are nice and all, but have you thought about who’s job it is to mow the grass? Meet Mike Seaman, who leads a seven-person crew. (NY Times)

Much like Williamsburg, the neighborhood it calls home, the Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel and San Paolino di Nola is changing with the times. For the first time organizers opened up the carrying of the giglio, a four-ton and 72-foot-tall spire, and a life-size sculpture of a boat, to outsiders. This Sunday is giglio Sunday. (NY Times)

Irving Plaza is closed for eight months to be renovated. (EV Grieve)

The city provides about 146 square feet of green space per resident, which is smaller than a 12 foot by 12-foot room. Of the fifteen major cities in the story, New York was dead last. (Patch)

Speaking of green space, Shirley Chisholm State Park can lay claim to the title of “the city’s nicest park built on top of a toxic dump.” (Curbed)

In reflection of its 20th year, Untapped Cities sat down with Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond to discuss his favorite places in the city, future public projects, the Spur, and more. (Untapped Cities)

The latest step in a neighbor-feud in Kew Gardens is a bloody splattered mannequin who seems to be daring neighbors to call 311 against it. A truly amazing amount of pettiness. (Gothamist)

The expansion of the city’s speed camera program kicked off this week. The city will add 40-60 cameras a month until the number reaches 750 from the current 140. (Curbed)

“Slave Play,” a look at race relations through the prism of the sexual hangups of three interracial couples, is coming to Broadway this spring and will run for 17 weeks. (NY Times)

The reunited The Misfits announced their first-ever show at Madison Square Garden, tickets are on sale next week. (BrooklynVegan)

How Darren Walker, a gay black man who grew up poor in Texas, came to be one of the best-connected people in New York City. And what that means for the future of philanthropy. (NY Times)

A photo gallery of Coney Island through the years. (amNY)

The Parks Department publicly apologized to the family of Robert Sommer, who was one of the fifteen cyclists killed by drivers this year, for removing his memorial ghost bike in Marine Park without notifying his family first. (Brooklyn Paper)

Would you pay $275 to be a guest on a podcast? Say what you want, but it’s working for Uluç Ülgen, the host of mürmur, a podcast that is “part performance art, part social documentary, part mystical, and part comedy.” If you don’t want to pay the fee to appear, you can always subscribe on iTunes. (Bedford + Bowery)

A taxi jumped the curb and crashed into a Westville in Hell’s Kitchen on Ninth Avenue Westville. Five people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and three declined medical attention. No reason was released for the driver’s actions. (Gothamist)

The Washington Square Park “Die-In” to bring attention to the crisis created by the failures of the mayor’s Vision Zero program has worked. Nearly every media outlet in the city has written about it, and it has now received the New York Times treatment. (NY Times)

More and more people in Brooklyn and Queens are choosing to renew their leases instead of moving to new apartments. Rants in both boroughs are up, but rents in Queens are down 4.2% since May. (The Real Deal)

Mia Simmons, the 20-year-old woman charged with manslaughter for the stabbing death of 30-year-old Latanya Watson, was defending herself according to her lawyer. Video footage shows the pair fighting on the platform and Simmons’s lawyer claims Watson was the aggressor. (Gothamist)

An Ed Sheeran pop-up shop will be open on Wooster Street today from 3:06 through 9:06. Now you know where to go or where to avoid, depending who you are. (amNY)

Say hello to the Carrot Dog, the humane twist on the New York staple, which are now available ay by CHLOE. Delightful, disgusting, or both? (Gothamist)

Whoops, the Time Out Market in Dumbo was shut down by the Department of Health. The food hall is expected to be reopened shortly. (Eater)

The MTA’s rules restrict the kinds of secondary jobs its workers can hold, which three dozen violated by moonlighting as Lyft /Uber drivers without agency permission. Five were fired. (Patch)

The governor won’t sign a bill that would loosen restrictions on affidavit ballots that would also retroactively decide the contested Queens DA race. (Jackson Heights Post)

After the arrest of Tyresse Singleton for the alleged burning of rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge in Harlem, a new set of flags are proudly waving. (amNY)

A look inside the bribery and corruption of two men who are partially responsible for the current taxi medallion financial crisis. (NY Times)

Everyone has a friend who always chooses the most expensive restaurant possible and the bill for the eight of you looks like someone’s rent instead of a bill for the meal. That’s the inspiration behind the list of the best restaurants for affordable group dinners. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 16, 2019 – The “Birds Are Cool and Trash Pandas are Getting Vaccinated” Edition

The city’s fight again measles continues with a preschool shutdown, a pipeline threatens Rockaway Beach, New York pizza in the Virgin Islands, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

CompStat, the focus of a recent ReplyAll episode, is being blamed in a $70 million lawsuit by a Brooklyn family against the NYPD for harassment and a false arrest. (Daily News)

The MTA can tout percentages of trains that have had improving performance, but the truth of the matter is that Monday morning’s commute was a nightmare for the A, C, E, F, M, J, and G trains. (Gothamist)

Now that birds are as cool as a street corner shaved ice, here are sixteen of the best bird-watching spots in the city. (Curbed)

Webster Hall is reopening this month and the first show was announced: Jay-Z. (BrooklynVegan)

This makes no small claim, but Eater has a profile of the women who make New York’s “most perfect tortillas.” (Eater)

107 years (and a day) after the Titanic sunk and 21 years after Kate Winslet let Leonardo DiCaprio die, here are ten city sites that connect New York to the sunken ship. (6sqft)

Ten places to visit in the city for a “small town” feel. (Untapped Cities)

President Trump’s executive order expediting gas pipelines is hitting close to home, with the Williams Northeast Supply Enhancement, which is proposed to run from Pennsylvania and terminate close to Rockaway Beach. Opponents say the project will threaten the harbor and marine life in the area. (QNS)

New York may have been able to fight off Amazon, but Jeff Bezos is still eyeing property. Rumor is he’s looking to spend $60 million on a new apartment, which would be a few blocks from other apartments he owns. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The death of Nipsey Hussle inspired a march for peace over with hundreds of current and former gang members in the South Bronx. (Gothamist)

The second-tallest building in the Western Hemisphere is moving forward. The building will require special permits, but if it’s allowed it will be 1,556 feet tall and the 18th “supertall” tower to be constructed in the last dozen years. (6qsft)

What is the cost of a measles outbreak? A single outbreak can cost an individual nearly $10,000 and more than $5 million for a community. (The Indicator from Planet Money)

The city shut down a preschool program at a Brooklyn yeshiva for violating the Health Department order that requires them to have a corrective action plan for measles. (NY Times)

A lawsuit claims that the measles outbreak in the city isn’t an emergency and demanding a restraining order on the mayor’s mandatory vaccination rule that went into effect last Tuesday. There have been 285 confirmed measles cases in Williamsburg since October. (Gothamist)

If your day has been stressful, take a moment to watch Maxine the Fluffy Corgi fight to stay awake while riding the subway. (Viewing NYC)

While new explicitly New York, it is New York pizza related. The best restaurant in the U.S. Virgin Islands is a New York pizza food truck boat in Christmas Cove. (Atlas Obscura)

All seven BQE rehab plans, explained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

City Winery, which will lose its current location when Disney’s offices eat the West Village, will have a new home in early 2020 at Hudson River Park’s Pier 57. (Eater)

Brooklyn Bride Park’s spring and summer lineup was announced, including a kite festival, the MET Opera, stargazing, a more. (Bklyner)

The Met Museum’s new rooftop installation “Parapivot” touches on the interstellar, Manhattan’s grid, and is meant to invoke a connection to “the multiverse above and around us, too.” (amNY)

No one wants to pay full price, and that includes State Senator Andrew Gounardes. Gounardes is arguing that Brooklyn residents who frequent the Verrazzano bridge should receive a discount. The discount for Staten Island residents was put in place because it seemed unfair to charge full price for every single way to get in or out of the borough. There are many roads in and out of Brooklyn. (Bklyner)

Here’s a stunning time-lapse of the Manhattan skies after a snowstorm. (Scott Segler)

The NYCHA’s inspection of 135,000 apartments for lead hazards begun this week. At the current rate, the inspections are scheduled to end before 2020. The mayor has not appointed a new NYCHA chair since the deadline passed on April 1. (amNY)

Portions of the city’s trash panda population will be vaccinated for rabies. No lawsuits are expected as a result of the vaccine implementation. (Gothamist)

The American Museum of Natural History canceled the gala that would have honored Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s asshole president. Sorry Brazil, we can only deal with one asshole president at a time. (Gothamist)

Lyft plans on integrating Citi Bikes into the main Lyft app starting in May, which will allow you to pay for your bike and ride in one app. It’s also a good way to educate New Yorkers that Lyft owns Motivate, Citi Bike’s parent company. (Patch)

It was the parents and not City Hall that successfully desegregated schools in District 3 and 15 when the city seemed to be incapable of doing so while the rest of the city’s education system remains one of the most segregated in the nation. (NY Times)

After three deaths on construction sites this week the City Council is pushing for the implementation of a construction safety training law passed in 2017. (Queens Crap)

The best Omakase sushi in the city, ranked by price. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for April 2, 2019 – The “Most Expensive Toll Bridge in America is Not What You Think” Edition

Democrats are splintering over the state’s budget, the Pride March route, Harlem’s disappearing apartments, teens can’t legally vape, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Only 61.9% of New Yorkers participated in the 2010 census and to make sure more New Yorkers participate in 2020 the state cut the budget for the census in half. Oh wait, that doesn’t sound right. (Bklyner)

Nude sunrise yoga? Shockingly, we’re not talking about Bushwick. (LICTalk)

The “Clock Tower Buiding” in Tribeca needs a new name. The clock tower is being turned into a penthouse apartment. (Curbed)

The most expensive toll in America takes you to… Staten Island. (Patch)

Sorry, teens, no more vaping for you. In 120 days, the legal age to buy tobacco products, electronic cigarettes and liquid nicotine in New York will be raised from 18 to 21. (NY Post)

A disagreement over sick-leave will mean that the city’s fire engines may be left shorthanded, reducing some teams by 20%. (Patch)

The governor called the state budget the “greatest budget of the past decade,” but 17 Democrats in the state assembly voted against it because it was not progressive enough. (NY Times)

80% of the funds raised from congestion pricing will go towards MTA capital projects, with the remaining 20% being split between the LIRR and Metro North. (Curbed)

Today is one of six Equal Pay Days. (amNY)

Video: This is what the city’s war on electric bikes through the eyes of a Chinese delivery person. (Gothamist)

Rabbi Dovid Feldman is calling on City Councilmember Kalman Yeger to resign after his comment that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Brooklyn Paper)

Kalman Yeger has been removed from the City Council Committee on Immigration. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s new mansion tax will raise $365 million for the MTA. (6sqft)

No one is buying Mayor de Blasio’s claim to be reducing the city’s fleet of cars. (Streetblog)

AOC tweets, the NY Post has to write about it. (NY Post)

Congestion pricing may have passed, but the MTA is looking for technology solutions to implement it. (amNY)

David Blaine is the latest public figure to be under investigation from the NYPD for alleged sexual assault. (Gothamist)

Okay, so there was no legal weed in the state’s budget, but the governor is totally going to do it by June. (NY Post)

Watch: Can you tell the difference between New York pizza and a slice from a chain? (Viewing NYC)

Where to eat at Citi Field, where you can also find a baseball team playing sometimes. (Eater)

Harlem saw a decrease of 831 housing units despite an uptick in construction. Where are the apartments going? (Curbed)

The route for this year’s Pride March has been released, making a “U” starting at Madison Square Park heading down to the Stonewall Inn and coming back up 7th Ave to end at 23rd St. (The Villager)

If you’re on Roosevelt Island, avoid Octagon Field. Two dads and six kids were issued a summons for playing on the field. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Two former NYPD detectives who dodged rape convictions are asking a judge to ban the DNA evidence in that case from being used in the new one against them. (NY Post)

Hunts Point, the neighborhood that feeds NYC. (Streeteasy)

Michael Grimm, the current convicted felon and former member of Congress, is considering running for Congress again. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

21 ideal date-night restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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