The Briefly for December 4-5, 2020 – The “Where to Cry in Public” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The vaccine arrives in NYC by December 15, Marie’s Crisis reopens, the Dyker Heights lights are back (with controversy), and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 51˚
Rain starting in the afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 32˚ High: 46˚

Get a jump on January and learn how to run in the winter. (Jen A. Miller for NY Times)

The state’s Green Light Law, which allowed undocumented immigrants to apply for driver’s licenses, survived a federal appeals court challenge. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

12 new public art installations this month. (Untapped New York)

There’s a screenshot of the best places to cry in NYC making its way around the internet but experienced public cryers will know there was an entire Tumblr account dedicated to places to cry. (NYC Crying Guide)

Gothamist wants your help to write NYC a love letter for 2020. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Video: Did you see (and hear) the terrifying sights and sounds of the Verrazzano Bridge on Monday during the storm? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Remember that guy who experienced a living nightmare of falling 12 feet through the sidewalk into a sinkhole that was full of rats where he was trapped for 30 minutes? He’s suing. It doesn’t matter what the amount is, it isn’t enough. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Meet Charles Barry, who has been scamming subway riders for nearly 40 years and has been arrested about 160 times. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Marie’s Crisis is ready to open again on December 8 at a 25% capacity, allowing only 15 patrons in at a time. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A list of NYC-themed gifts. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

“These employees allegedly worked very hard – to steal MTA time and money,” say hello to the five MTA employees accused of “brazen, repeated” overtime fraud. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The construction of the Statue of Liberty. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

It’s the future site of 1,000 below-market-rate apartments and according to the EPA, it’s also home to a ton of toxic pollution a few feet underground. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Staten Island’s Mac’s Public House declared itself an “autonomous zone” from the state’s Covid-19 laws. It’s co-owner Danny Presti was arrested. This was followed by a swam of shitheads gathering to protest. The zip code has the fourth-highest Covid-19 positivity rate in the city. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Two dozen subway cars were hit by a graffiti storm over the weekend, hitting the 1, 6, M, G, and Q lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Photos: The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is lit. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Despite what you may have read in this very newsletter, you don’t actually need a ticket to see the Christmas tree, but they are limiting the number of people who can be in the plaza at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The history of the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Looking for a less auspicious holiday light display? Check out this Google Doc with almost 30 holiday light displays across the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Speaking of holiday displays, the Dyker Heights Christmas lights are coming back this year, and people are not happy about it. 2020, amirite? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

6 department store holiday windows to check out. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

RIP Betsy Wade, the first woman to edit news copy for The New York Times. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

The city can’t move the homeless New Yorkers from the Upper West Side’s Lucerne Hotel for at least two more weeks after an Appellate Court issued a temporary stay that prevents the city from moving them. This story has been ongoing since July. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

It’s looking more and more like auditions for city schools’ performing arts programs will be moving online. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Outdoor dining is looking more and more like indoor dining. Bedford + Bowery asks and answers if it’s safe. The answer is that it is not. (Justin McGowan for Bedford + Bowery)

A new report that looks at data from 121 cities over 10 years shows that mass transit is not a significant vector for spreading viruses. That being said, wear your damn masks on the subway. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside NYC’s biggest Covid-19 lab. (Elizabeth Kim with photos by Scott Heins for Gothamist)

78% of the surveyed restaurant workers report hostile behavior from customers when staff try to enforce COVID-19 safety rules according to a new study from the One Fair Wage advocacy group. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

New York will get 170,000 doses of the Covid-19 vaccine by December 15, according to Governor Cuomo. The first phase of distribution will be focused on healthcare workers and residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Unboxing videos on YouTube hit their peak in popularity around 2014, but that didn’t stop Governor Cuomo’s live unboxing of an empty Pfizer vaccine box during a press conference this week. “What’s up, it’s ya boy Gov Cuomo and today we’re unboxing a vaccine. Remember to like, comment, and subscribe if you wanna see more content like this in the future and also to smash that bell icon to get notifications because you might miss a video if you don’t.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The CDC shortened its recommended quarantine to 10 days, but included a plea to just stop traveling. Roni Caryn Rabin for NY Times)

Dr Fauci, who will be staying on with the Biden administration, said we could get “back to normal, or at least approaching close to normal, as you get into the late summer and early fall,” if 75-85% of Americans get vaccinated. This was in response to a question about Broadway reopening, which has been closed since March 12 of this year. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The New York Blood Center fears a blood shortage. Here’s how to help. (Ron Lee for NY1)

10 holiday markets, pop-ups, and sales this weekend. (the skint)

The Briefly for July 29, 2019 – The “Are Inflatable Rats An Endangered Species?” Edition

Crown Heights looks for an upzoning compromise, how much you need to afford a two-bedroom apartment, Gil the guide dog learns the subways, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Clumsy, overcooked and pointless.” Moulin Rouge on Broadway isn’t winning over critics. (amNY)

Inside the Department of Sanitation’s Certified Organic Recycling (CORe), which probably smells just lovely, where they are turning the city’s food scraps into methane that will be used to heat homes and run in natural gas lines. (Bushwick Daily)

A fifth NYPD officer since June has committed suicide. Commissioner James O’Neill declared a mental health crisis in June in an attempt to fight the stigma of seeking help. (NY Times)

Don’t leave your unwanted pets in the city’s parks, they don’t have the survival instincts necessary to stay alive. A rabbit was rescued from Prospect Park. Larry the bunny is in a foster home in Bergen Beach. (Patch)

Is the inflatable protest rat an endangered species? (Gothamist)

Amazon continues to make headlines whenever the company looks at office space. After abandoning the Long Island City HQ2 idea and One Court Square’s million feet of office space, they’ve continually looked for a smaller space for their current NYC employees. The latest location is the old Lord & Taylor building on Fifth Ave, which is currently owned by WeWork. (Curbed)

Has street flooding during rainstorms always been this bad? The city’s construction boom is contributing to the floods. (Gothamist)

An attempt to answer the question “why is the city so loud?” (Viewing NYC)

How much should you be earning to afford a two-bedroom apartment in the city? According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, it’s $162,857, but when was the last time you knew anyone to only spend 30% of their income on rent? (6sqft)

Advocates in Gowanus are proposing the idea of an Environmental Special District to prevent any new construction due to a possible rezoning to prevent adding more wastewater that would end up in the canal, potentially spoiling the ongoing Superfund work. (Curbed)

The latest location for a flower flash was one of the city’s last phone booths on the Upper West Side, which was the subject of the children’s book The Lonely Phone Booth. Blink and you’ll miss it because flower flashes sometimes last only a few hours. (Gothamist)

Another week, another entry into the 100+ point health inspection violation club. Among the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is Jorge’s in Ridgewood with 124 points. (Patch)

Find every Privately Owned Public Space in the city with this map. (Viewing NYC)

After 20 years, Park Slope rents will finally drive gay bar Excelsior out of business for good. (Bklyner)

The city is suing American Airlines for violating its paid sick leave laws, passed in 2014. (Gothamist)

Come for the photos of Gil, an eight-month-old Labrador retriever, stay for the story of a guide dog learning how to navigate the subways. (amNY)

City Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer and Daniel Dromm celebrated the New York Public Library’s new $564 million budget with Drag Queen Story Hour, which will receive $25,000. (Jackson Heights Post)

A dispensary grows in Brooklyn. (6sqft)

Crown Heights is experiencing something rarely seen in the city: an attempt at a compromise between two competing plans when it comes to the future upzoning of the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Which is worse: Rodents or roaches? (Splinter)

A shooting during a Saturday night block party in Brownsville resulted in 11 wounded and one dead. (Huff Post)

A body was discovered in the waters under the Verrazzano Bridge on Sunday afternoon. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Rising rents may be an issue, but the next retail crisis will come from rising property taxes, which are up 71.6% since 2009. (Patch)

Raising a child in NYC costs more than sending that same child to a four-year state college. (Patch)

The millions of dollars the city has wasted on paying for roof work which should have been free in NYCHA buildings would have been better spending lit on fire to replace the failed heating systems. The spending on roofs still under their warrantees was discovered by City Comptroller Scott Stringer. (NY Times)

Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney is requesting the mayor have a Canyon of Heroes parade for the survivors and first responders of 9/11. The mayor called it a “great idea.” (Patch)

Sometimes you just want to look at photos of baby animals, and that’s okay. Here are some newborn owls and ospreys born in the city. (Gothamist)

In response to the backlash over some police officers having water thrown on them, the political right (and the president) are demanding respect for the NYPD. Josmar Trujillo asks “Have they earned it?” (Gothamist)

The five best ice cream sandwiches in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “A Love Letter to the Salt Bagel” Weekend Edition

Fighting this weekend’s planned ICE raids, more people are staying put in Brooklyn and Queens, the city’s speed camera program starts to expand and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The president’s ICE raids scheduled to take place this weekend have included New York as a target. The governor announced anyone in need of assistance may contact the Liberty Defense Project via the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 or liberty@dos.ny.gov.

What should you do if ICE is at your door or the door of someone you know? Here are the ACLU’s guidelines and outlines of your rights. (ACLU)

The Amazon Web Services Summit at the Javitz Center drew crowds protesting Amazon’s involvement with ICE with their Rekognition Video system. (amNY)

Riding the subway still sucks, but it sucks the least its sucked since 2013, with an on-time performance over 80%. (Curbed)

Check the trains before you venture out this weekend. This is the last weekend of reduced L train service before the multi-week night and weekend partial shutdown starts and remains through January. (Subway Weekender)

R. Kelly was arrested by the NYPD and Homeland Security in Chicago on federal sex trafficking charges and is expected to be brought to New York to face those charges. (NBC New York)

A love letter to the salt bagel. (Eater)

The NYPD claims to have figured out the reason for an uptick of shootings in northern Brooklyn: District Attorney Eric Gonzalez. The NYPD is blaming a program where weapons-possession offenders can plead guilty and take part in an educational program instead of being jailed. Putting the blame on this program has two flaws. The program is a decade old, the uptick in shootings are only in one portion of the borough while the program is borough-wide, and it does not apply to anyone who has used a gun, only those possessing them. (Brooklyn Paper)

Have mannequin, will carpool. A hero from New Jersey was pulled over on the Verrazzano Bridge for trying to using his “friend” as a reason to use the HOV lane. (Gothamist)

The photos your friends post to Instagram from Storm King are nice and all, but have you thought about who’s job it is to mow the grass? Meet Mike Seaman, who leads a seven-person crew. (NY Times)

Much like Williamsburg, the neighborhood it calls home, the Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel and San Paolino di Nola is changing with the times. For the first time organizers opened up the carrying of the giglio, a four-ton and 72-foot-tall spire, and a life-size sculpture of a boat, to outsiders. This Sunday is giglio Sunday. (NY Times)

Irving Plaza is closed for eight months to be renovated. (EV Grieve)

The city provides about 146 square feet of green space per resident, which is smaller than a 12 foot by 12-foot room. Of the fifteen major cities in the story, New York was dead last. (Patch)

Speaking of green space, Shirley Chisholm State Park can lay claim to the title of “the city’s nicest park built on top of a toxic dump.” (Curbed)

In reflection of its 20th year, Untapped Cities sat down with Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond to discuss his favorite places in the city, future public projects, the Spur, and more. (Untapped Cities)

The latest step in a neighbor-feud in Kew Gardens is a bloody splattered mannequin who seems to be daring neighbors to call 311 against it. A truly amazing amount of pettiness. (Gothamist)

The expansion of the city’s speed camera program kicked off this week. The city will add 40-60 cameras a month until the number reaches 750 from the current 140. (Curbed)

“Slave Play,” a look at race relations through the prism of the sexual hangups of three interracial couples, is coming to Broadway this spring and will run for 17 weeks. (NY Times)

The reunited The Misfits announced their first-ever show at Madison Square Garden, tickets are on sale next week. (BrooklynVegan)

How Darren Walker, a gay black man who grew up poor in Texas, came to be one of the best-connected people in New York City. And what that means for the future of philanthropy. (NY Times)

A photo gallery of Coney Island through the years. (amNY)

The Parks Department publicly apologized to the family of Robert Sommer, who was one of the fifteen cyclists killed by drivers this year, for removing his memorial ghost bike in Marine Park without notifying his family first. (Brooklyn Paper)

Would you pay $275 to be a guest on a podcast? Say what you want, but it’s working for Uluç Ülgen, the host of mürmur, a podcast that is “part performance art, part social documentary, part mystical, and part comedy.” If you don’t want to pay the fee to appear, you can always subscribe on iTunes. (Bedford + Bowery)

A taxi jumped the curb and crashed into a Westville in Hell’s Kitchen on Ninth Avenue Westville. Five people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and three declined medical attention. No reason was released for the driver’s actions. (Gothamist)

The Washington Square Park “Die-In” to bring attention to the crisis created by the failures of the mayor’s Vision Zero program has worked. Nearly every media outlet in the city has written about it, and it has now received the New York Times treatment. (NY Times)

More and more people in Brooklyn and Queens are choosing to renew their leases instead of moving to new apartments. Rants in both boroughs are up, but rents in Queens are down 4.2% since May. (The Real Deal)

Mia Simmons, the 20-year-old woman charged with manslaughter for the stabbing death of 30-year-old Latanya Watson, was defending herself according to her lawyer. Video footage shows the pair fighting on the platform and Simmons’s lawyer claims Watson was the aggressor. (Gothamist)

An Ed Sheeran pop-up shop will be open on Wooster Street today from 3:06 through 9:06. Now you know where to go or where to avoid, depending who you are. (amNY)

Say hello to the Carrot Dog, the humane twist on the New York staple, which are now available ay by CHLOE. Delightful, disgusting, or both? (Gothamist)

Whoops, the Time Out Market in Dumbo was shut down by the Department of Health. The food hall is expected to be reopened shortly. (Eater)

The MTA’s rules restrict the kinds of secondary jobs its workers can hold, which three dozen violated by moonlighting as Lyft /Uber drivers without agency permission. Five were fired. (Patch)

The governor won’t sign a bill that would loosen restrictions on affidavit ballots that would also retroactively decide the contested Queens DA race. (Jackson Heights Post)

After the arrest of Tyresse Singleton for the alleged burning of rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge in Harlem, a new set of flags are proudly waving. (amNY)

A look inside the bribery and corruption of two men who are partially responsible for the current taxi medallion financial crisis. (NY Times)

Everyone has a friend who always chooses the most expensive restaurant possible and the bill for the eight of you looks like someone’s rent instead of a bill for the meal. That’s the inspiration behind the list of the best restaurants for affordable group dinners. (The Infatuation)

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