The Briefly for April 2, 2019 – The “Most Expensive Toll Bridge in America is Not What You Think” Edition

Democrats are splintering over the state’s budget, the Pride March route, Harlem’s disappearing apartments, teens can’t legally vape, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Only 61.9% of New Yorkers participated in the 2010 census and to make sure more New Yorkers participate in 2020 the state cut the budget for the census in half. Oh wait, that doesn’t sound right. (Bklyner)

Nude sunrise yoga? Shockingly, we’re not talking about Bushwick. (LICTalk)

The “Clock Tower Buiding” in Tribeca needs a new name. The clock tower is being turned into a penthouse apartment. (Curbed)

The most expensive toll in America takes you to… Staten Island. (Patch)

Sorry, teens, no more vaping for you. In 120 days, the legal age to buy tobacco products, electronic cigarettes and liquid nicotine in New York will be raised from 18 to 21. (NY Post)

A disagreement over sick-leave will mean that the city’s fire engines may be left shorthanded, reducing some teams by 20%. (Patch)

The governor called the state budget the “greatest budget of the past decade,” but 17 Democrats in the state assembly voted against it because it was not progressive enough. (NY Times)

80% of the funds raised from congestion pricing will go towards MTA capital projects, with the remaining 20% being split between the LIRR and Metro North. (Curbed)

Today is one of six Equal Pay Days. (amNY)

Video: This is what the city’s war on electric bikes through the eyes of a Chinese delivery person. (Gothamist)

Rabbi Dovid Feldman is calling on City Councilmember Kalman Yeger to resign after his comment that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Brooklyn Paper)

Kalman Yeger has been removed from the City Council Committee on Immigration. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s new mansion tax will raise $365 million for the MTA. (6sqft)

No one is buying Mayor de Blasio’s claim to be reducing the city’s fleet of cars. (Streetblog)

AOC tweets, the NY Post has to write about it. (NY Post)

Congestion pricing may have passed, but the MTA is looking for technology solutions to implement it. (amNY)

David Blaine is the latest public figure to be under investigation from the NYPD for alleged sexual assault. (Gothamist)

Okay, so there was no legal weed in the state’s budget, but the governor is totally going to do it by June. (NY Post)

Watch: Can you tell the difference between New York pizza and a slice from a chain? (Viewing NYC)

Where to eat at Citi Field, where you can also find a baseball team playing sometimes. (Eater)

Harlem saw a decrease of 831 housing units despite an uptick in construction. Where are the apartments going? (Curbed)

The route for this year’s Pride March has been released, making a “U” starting at Madison Square Park heading down to the Stonewall Inn and coming back up 7th Ave to end at 23rd St. (The Villager)

If you’re on Roosevelt Island, avoid Octagon Field. Two dads and six kids were issued a summons for playing on the field. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Two former NYPD detectives who dodged rape convictions are asking a judge to ban the DNA evidence in that case from being used in the new one against them. (NY Post)

Hunts Point, the neighborhood that feeds NYC. (Streeteasy)

Michael Grimm, the current convicted felon and former member of Congress, is considering running for Congress again. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

21 ideal date-night restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 1, 2019 – The “Congestion Pricing is Not An April Fools Joke” Edition

Participatory budgeting is here, a look at the state’s budget, the MTA starts cleaning up elevated tracks, the NYC brunch directory, and more in today’s daily NY news edition.

Quick note: There are no April Fools articles listed today.

Late night subway work this week will affect the 1, 3, 6, D, F, N, R, and G trains. (Subway Changes)

The state’s $175 billion budget passed early on Sunday, including cash bail reforms, a new mansion tax, a plastic bag ban, a property tax cap, and congestion pricing. (NY Times)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban. (Grub Street)

What’s not included in the state’s budget? Mobile sports betting. (NY Post)

Seven takeaways from the state budget. (NY Times)

It’s time to vote in participatory budgeting! There is $35 million to spend in the 32 communities in the city and you have a say in how it’s spent, and you can vote online! (nyc.gov)

Once you’ve voted, you can submit your own idea for the next cycle, like this idea for new bike racks. (PBNYC)

With the Hudson Yards open, the city has turned its eyes towards the next railroad yard to develop in Sunnyside, Queens. (Sunnyside Post)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

An ode to the longtime neighborhood bar and what the loss of it means for the city. (Curbed)

Citi Bike is headed to where it’s never been before: Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Add the D train to the list of trains you want to steer clear of walking underneath. The MTA announced it will start cleaning the undersides of the D train’s elevated tracks after the 7 train started raining subway parts last month. The work is starting from the Stillwell Ave station. (Bklyner)

A history of NYC’s 13 triangle buildings. (Untapped Cities)

Summer school, but this is actually interesting. Prospect Park is looking or immigrant professors, researches, and lecturers to teach their “Open Air University,” which runs from June 11 to June 30. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Summerhill, Crown Heights’ “bullet hole” bar, has closed. (News 12)

Smorgasburg is coming back to its outdoor locations and Time Out has some suggestions about what you’re gonna want to taste. Here’s the full list of vendors/a>. (Time Out)

Former Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis has been accused of rape. Porzingis claims the encounter was consensual. (amNY)

Sink your sweet tooth into Godiva’s midtown cafe, opening on April 18. (Eater)

It’s estimated 90,000 to 230,000 birds die in the city as a result of colliding with glass buildings. A proposed bill would require 90% of glass in new and altered buildings to be treated to reduce bird fatalities. (Curbed)

Inside the battle to fight off invasive species washing down the Bronx River from Westchester. (NY Times)

6sqft is hiring!

Should you wash your hands after being on the subway? No, because except Brooklyn. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Former Assemblymember Dov Hikind is blaming a Bklyner reporter for organizing the protest against Councilmember Kalman Yeger’s comments that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Bklyner)

There’s at least one benefit of living in Staten Island: it only costs you $5.50 to cross the Verrazzano to Brooklyn. If you’re a Brooklynite (or anyone else), it’ll cost you $19. (Bklyner)

A deep dive into Industry City’s effect on Sunset Park and UPROSE, a decades-old community group whose goal was always to revitalize that area as a manufacturing hub. (The Indypendent)

If you have someone who always wants to go to brunch but never has an idea of where to go: The NYC Brunch Directory. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 25, 2019 – The “Next Neighborhood to be Gentrified” Edition

Central Park has a new hot bird, the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, the Gandalf of Greenpoint, the man caught kicking a woman in the head arrested, and more in today’s daily NYC news brief.

Bad news for you if you’re on one of the seven subway lines with late night closures and service changes this week. (Subway Changes)

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire was 108 years ago today. (The Forward)

A look at 100 years of progress for women in New York’s political positions of power. (NY Times)

Eight monuments dedicated to real women. (Untapped Cities)

Is Brownsville going to be the next target for gentrification? The National Community Reinvestment Coalition’s “Shifting Neighborhood” report says it’s already begun. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Turns out Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick aren’t great as neighbors. (NY Post)

DUMBO’s cobblestone streets are disappearing. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Forget the hot Mandarin Duck, this season’s new hot bird is the Central Park Great Blue Heron. (Gothamist)

Yeah, birds are cool but how about the rise in the population of seals? (Viewing NYC)

The Gandalf of Greenpoint is the subway wizard we need. (Bedford + Bowery)

What constitutes a museum? Does a collection of 100 mugshots displayed in a Prospect Heights apartment count? (Gothamist)

Eat in Greenpoint like you’re Polish. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Sacred Sites Open House weekend is on May 18 and 19 if you’ve been looking to get a look behind the scenes of the city’s houses of worship. (amNY)

The man who was allegedly shown kicking an elderly woman in the head on the subway was arrested. He claims the old woman threatened to stab him, his wife, and his daughter and that’s why he kicked her in the face. (NY Post)

The prosecutor supervising Michael Cohen’s case is leaving his job in April. (Politico)

Remember last week’s proposal to put a bike lane on the Verrazzano Bridge? It’s dead. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A bunch of buzzkill doctors issued a joint statement opposing marijuana legalization in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Delaware. (NY Post)

MTA Unveils New Designated Seating For Commuters Who Look Like They’re About To Snap” (The Onion)

People in East Flatbush are so comfortable with the low crime rates in their neighborhood they are leaving their cars unlocked, causing an uptick in crime. *shakes head* (Bklyner)

The house belonging to Michael Corleone in ‘The Godfather’ is for sale. Perhaps you’d like to make them an offer they can’t refure? (NY Post)

Better get your Zyrtec, Claritin, and whatever else you can think of now. This year’s allergy season is going to be hell. (Patch)

The city’s trash panda population are getting more and more brazen with every passing day. This time they claimed ownership of the A train tracks in Queens. (Patch)

Despite saying the death of the Amazon deal has been “talked to death,” the governor couldn’t help but talk about it even more, saying the opposing politicians engaged in a “form of corruption.” (28.2% of our readers said they blame Cuomo and de Blasio for the collapse of the deal) (NY Post)

The Guggenheim will no longer accept money from the Sackler family, the family who profited heavily from the opioid crisis. It follows the Tate and the British National Portrait Gallery. (NY Times)

Don’t call for robocall scams this tax season. Actually, don’t answer your phone until the fall. (Viewing NYC)

HUD Administrator Lynne Patton continued her tour of NYCHA facilities, finally hitting Staten Island, where she said the development was “inhumane” and a “humanitarian crisis.” (NY Post)

If you rent an apartment, do you have a right to a key? As keyless systems are on the rise, some tenants don’t have keys to their homes. (NY Times)

How bad is Amtrak service at Penn Station? How about a maintenance train derailed over the weekend. (NY Post)

A man wearing only a shirt (the full Donald Duck”) was shot by the NYPD in Queens after setting a car on fire outside a police precint. He was arrested and is expected to survive. (NY Times)

A goat escaped a slaughterhouse in the Bronx. Seeking asylum, the goat found sanctuary at a farm upstate, and that’s not a euphemism. (NY Post)

Say hello to four of the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

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