The Briefly for December 16, 2019 – The “A Bathroom Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD’s secret gang database isn’t going anywhere, the fate of electric bikes and scooters hangs in the balance, the best new restaurants of 2019, & more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 37˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

Late night disruptions are headed to the 7, A, F, J, and Q trains this week. Check the trains before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

From the inspiration wall to the sprinkle pool, a look inside the Museum of Ice Cream, which opened over the weekend. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Tenants in two Upper East Side NYCHA developments are suing to correct years of neglect and pervasive dysfunction, which were estimated to be at $100 million in 2017. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A bathroom grows in Bushwick. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The de Blasio administration has reached a deal with homeless advocates and City Council members to require certain developers receiving city funding to set aside 15 percent of their new rental units for homeless New Yorkers. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Check out the anti-slavery landmark interactive story map from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

This one’s worded a little weird. The headline is “areas that weren’t a thing 10 years ago,” and I’d argue that Gowanus or the Brooklyn Navy Yard existed, but they weren’t real estate hot spots. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The NYPD keeps a secret database of somewhere between 17,500 and 37,000 people, called the “Criminal Group Database.” There’s no evidence why you are included or how to get off it. The gang database is the target of the “Erase the Database” campaign, but the new NYPD commissioner and the mayor are both staunch supporters of it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A 13-year-old boy was arrested and charged in connection to the fatal stabbing of 18-year-old Barnard student Tessa Majors. The NYPD believes two additional people were involved in the stabbing. (Michael Gold, Jan Ransom and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The sense of safety that Morningside Park, which separates Columbia University from Harlem, has carried is recent years has changed with 20 robberies this year and punctuated with Tessa Majors’ murder. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

There’s a rumor that an abandoned train car with bullet-proof armor under the Waldorf Astoria was used by FDR to transport his limousine. While Baggage Car 002, the train car in question, wasn’t FDR’s, Track 61 has been used to move presidents and other government officials in and out of the Waldorf from the 30s through 2017. Baggage Car 002 is now at the Danbury Railway Museum. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Photos: Inside the Schitt’s Creek pop-up shop. (Jen Carlson, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist

Manhattan’s “bad cops list” has been released. DA Cyrus Vance released the list of NYPD officers with credibility problems in court thanks to a Freedom of Information request from WNYC/Gothamist. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

The Department of Transportation is turning to a new tactic with a series of Vision Zero ads targeting drivers: shame. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: More from the inside of the Museum of Ice Cream. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Jazmine Headley reached a $625,000 settlement with the city for the “formative incident of trauma” when her child was ripped from her during an arrest inside a assistance center. She was arrested for sitting on the floor and spend four nights in Rikers Island. Her arrest was caught on video and went viral. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s struggling actors have a new side hustle. Say goodbye to actor-waiters and say hello to actor-spin instructors. (Jae Thomas for Bedford + Bowery)

Governor Cuomo has a bill to legalize electric bikes and scooters, but there is no sign that he will sign it. (Zack Finn for NY1)

A look at the gossip inside the Gambino crime family, following the murder to the reputed underboss Francesco Cali in March. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Mayor Bill de Blasio say the NYPD’s arrest rate is “high” for hate crimes. The number is 42%. (Samir Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Governor Cuomo is looking to prevent people from getting a New York gun license if they have committed a serious crime in another state, including misdemeanors like forcible touching and other sex offenses. This is the first public proposal that will be outlined in his 2020 state of the state speech. (amNewYork)

The MTA rolled out its first all-electric articulated bus on Sunday, one of a new fleet that is part of the agency’s plan to shift away from diesel-powered buses in the years ahead. Articulated buses are double the length of a normal bus. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)