The Briefly for December 16, 2019 – The “A Bathroom Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD’s secret gang database isn’t going anywhere, the fate of electric bikes and scooters hangs in the balance, the best new restaurants of 2019, & more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 37˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

Late night disruptions are headed to the 7, A, F, J, and Q trains this week. Check the trains before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

From the inspiration wall to the sprinkle pool, a look inside the Museum of Ice Cream, which opened over the weekend. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Tenants in two Upper East Side NYCHA developments are suing to correct years of neglect and pervasive dysfunction, which were estimated to be at $100 million in 2017. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A bathroom grows in Bushwick. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The de Blasio administration has reached a deal with homeless advocates and City Council members to require certain developers receiving city funding to set aside 15 percent of their new rental units for homeless New Yorkers. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Check out the anti-slavery landmark interactive story map from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

This one’s worded a little weird. The headline is “areas that weren’t a thing 10 years ago,” and I’d argue that Gowanus or the Brooklyn Navy Yard existed, but they weren’t real estate hot spots. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The NYPD keeps a secret database of somewhere between 17,500 and 37,000 people, called the “Criminal Group Database.” There’s no evidence why you are included or how to get off it. The gang database is the target of the “Erase the Database” campaign, but the new NYPD commissioner and the mayor are both staunch supporters of it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A 13-year-old boy was arrested and charged in connection to the fatal stabbing of 18-year-old Barnard student Tessa Majors. The NYPD believes two additional people were involved in the stabbing. (Michael Gold, Jan Ransom and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The sense of safety that Morningside Park, which separates Columbia University from Harlem, has carried is recent years has changed with 20 robberies this year and punctuated with Tessa Majors’ murder. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

There’s a rumor that an abandoned train car with bullet-proof armor under the Waldorf Astoria was used by FDR to transport his limousine. While Baggage Car 002, the train car in question, wasn’t FDR’s, Track 61 has been used to move presidents and other government officials in and out of the Waldorf from the 30s through 2017. Baggage Car 002 is now at the Danbury Railway Museum. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Photos: Inside the Schitt’s Creek pop-up shop. (Jen Carlson, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist

Manhattan’s “bad cops list” has been released. DA Cyrus Vance released the list of NYPD officers with credibility problems in court thanks to a Freedom of Information request from WNYC/Gothamist. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

The Department of Transportation is turning to a new tactic with a series of Vision Zero ads targeting drivers: shame. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: More from the inside of the Museum of Ice Cream. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Jazmine Headley reached a $625,000 settlement with the city for the “formative incident of trauma” when her child was ripped from her during an arrest inside a assistance center. She was arrested for sitting on the floor and spend four nights in Rikers Island. Her arrest was caught on video and went viral. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s struggling actors have a new side hustle. Say goodbye to actor-waiters and say hello to actor-spin instructors. (Jae Thomas for Bedford + Bowery)

Governor Cuomo has a bill to legalize electric bikes and scooters, but there is no sign that he will sign it. (Zack Finn for NY1)

A look at the gossip inside the Gambino crime family, following the murder to the reputed underboss Francesco Cali in March. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Mayor Bill de Blasio say the NYPD’s arrest rate is “high” for hate crimes. The number is 42%. (Samir Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Governor Cuomo is looking to prevent people from getting a New York gun license if they have committed a serious crime in another state, including misdemeanors like forcible touching and other sex offenses. This is the first public proposal that will be outlined in his 2020 state of the state speech. (amNewYork)

The MTA rolled out its first all-electric articulated bus on Sunday, one of a new fleet that is part of the agency’s plan to shift away from diesel-powered buses in the years ahead. Articulated buses are double the length of a normal bus. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for June 12, 2019 – The “You’re A Landmark if You Like It or Not” Edition

The state’s legislature agreed to rent reforms, the best restaurants of 2019 so far, Cuomo gets serious about MTA overtime, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The state legislature agreed on a package of bills aimed at strengthening tenants rights and rent laws. The bills also would become permanent, so no more regular lobbying from the real estate industry to let the laws lapse when their expiration dates come. (NY Times)

Some of the rent reforms include ending vacancy decontrol, eliminating the ability of landlords to raise rents on vacancies, it would retain preferential rents for the life of a tenant, and dramatically limit improvement charges. (Politico)

Cool down with a look at the ice creams of Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

The Strand Bookstore is now a city landmark and as you might expect, despite a long campaign from owner Nancy Wyden against the idea. (Gothamist)

“My friend later told me that most of the businesses in this area dealt in cash only…so guns were pretty much everywhere…in every store.” New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Your regular reminder that you can check the city’s beaches for too much poop (how much poop is too much?) on the internet. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wanted to live in the Waldorf Astoria (and have more money than you know what to do with), the condos will be hitting the market this fall. (Curbed)

New York is the third most fun state in the country, behind Florida and California. The thing holding it back? It’s not the ratpocalypse or the mountains of trash on the sidewalks, it’s the high costs. (Patch)

Hundreds rallied after the death of Layleen Polanco in Rikers Island last week. She was being held and her bail was set at $500. The city is looking into the case, where she was sent into solitary confinement despite a history of seizures. (Gothamist)

Catch a sneak peek at NYC’s largest rainbow “flag”. (HuffPost)

The helicopter pilot who crashed into a building on Monday was lost in the rain and fog. Investigators are looking into how the craft ended up where it did instead of an airport in New Jersey. (NY Times)

FAA officials said that Timothy McCormack did not have the proper license to be operating the helicopter in low-visibility conditions. (HuffPost)

Congressmember Carolyn Maloney wants to ban all nonessential helicopter flights from Manhattan. The city banned rooftop helicopter landings after a 1977 crash on the roof of the MetLife building. (The Villager)

In the 1977 crash, five people were killed when an idling helicopter tipped over, four were on the roof, one was on the street below. (Gothamist)

The High Line’s final section is open. The Spur is the home of the High Line Plinth, a site dedicated to a rotating series of artists. (6sqft)

Watch the complete debate for Queens DA. (NY1)

During the debate, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz was the favored punching bag of the seven candidates. (Politico)

We could be seeing the beginning of the end of the measles epidemic in Brooklyn. Everyone celebrate by making sure you’re vaccinated. (amNY)

New York state is one of three that doesn’t allow paid surrogacy, but even with a progressive legislature, it isn’t certain to be abolished. Abolishment of the prohibition has the governor’s support and a bill passed the state senate, but it is stalled in the assembly, where it has split progressive support. (NY Times)

The “Flower Flashes” by Lewis Miller Design might be the city’s most wholesome vandalism the city has ever seen. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo plans on hiring the former federal prosecutor that convicted former Speaker of the State Assembly, Sheldon Siver, to investigate a former federal prosecutor to look into the overtime issue plaguing the MTA. (Politico)

Remember that T-Mobile/Spring merger? New York is suing to block it from happening. (Patch)

Riverside Park is getting a new skate park at 108th St. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Riverside at W 108th has a history as a skatepark. The Riverside Skate Park was the first “solid” skate park in the city, originally built by NYC skateboarding pioneer Andy Kessler. This piece in the Times from 2013 shows the history of the community’s dedication to maintaining it in honor of Kessler’s vision. (NY Times)

A guide to the pizza ovens of Brooklyn, illustrated by Koren Shadmi. (NY Times)

Jon Stewart, the conscience of New Yorkers, took to Congress on Tuesday to rightfully shame our government for not fully funding the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund. (Patch)

John Jay College is being sued by students who allege the college botched sexual misconduct allegations against four professors, called “The Swamp.” (Patch)

The best restaurants of 2019 so far, according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema. (Eater)

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