The Briefly for May 22, 2019 – The “A Carmel Frappuccino with Two Pumps of Pesticide Please” Edition

New York state closes in on the president, Fleet Week starts, a beloved ice cream shop is getting pushed out, where to eat outside, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Every subway stop’s median rent mapped. (/r/NYC)

Beyond The Streets” is bringing the work of 150 street artists to Williamsburg this summer. (Time Out)

Turns out Starbucks might have been using an industrial pesticide in an attempt to hide its unsanitary convictions. Which Starbucks? According to a new class-action lawsuit, it’s all of them in the city. (Gothamist)

The sky is falling, but this time it’s not the ceiling on the subways. A tourist is in critical, but stable, condition after a branch from a sickly tree in Washington Square Park fell on her. (Gothamist)

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. A minority-owned, beloved and long-standing shop in a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood is being forced to close. Scoops in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens is in the process of being evicted by its landlord after being in the neighborhood since 1984. (Bklyner)

Where to eat near the Javits Center (if you must). (Eater)

Naked Shakespeare in Prospect Park, just like the Bard intended it to be performed. (Time Out)

You’d think that after paying $53,000 a year to attend NYU you’d be able to easily get tickets to graduation. You’d be wrong. Tickets are going on the secondary market for hundreds of dollars. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is giving you an opportunity to listen to plants without having to drop acid. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The absolute worst time to leave for Memorial Day weekend will be between 4:45 and 6:45pm on Thursday, but delays will start today. (Curbed)

Your 2019 guide to city beaches. (Gothamist)

The goats who will landscape Riverside Park started their summer jobs and the photos are delightful. (Untapped Cities)

Today starts Fleet Week. Here’s what you need to know. (Patch)

The Port Authority wants your input to improve the Bus Terminal. No, you can’t say “burn it down.” (Curbed)

Ska is dead. The proof. “I love ska.” -Mayor de Blasio. (BrooklynVegan)

You have a few days to say farewell to the city’s only California Pizza Kitchen before it closes on Friday. (Eater)

There are more people in Manhattan than North and South Dakota, combined! (Viewing NYC)

David Byrne is trying to rally the mayor to restore a $59 million funding cut for cultural programs in this year’s budget. (Patch)

A great white shark continues to prowl near the city’s waters, but you can safely swim in the Long Island Sound. (NY Times)

The Daniel Pantaleo trial over the death of Eric Garner continues with multiple delays. After three hours this week, the case is taking a two-week hiatus. (Gothamist)

New York state is closing in on President Trump. A new bill will allow state prosecutors to pursue anyone granted a presidential pardon and the next up is a bill that will allow the state to release the president’s state tax returns to Congress. (NY Times)

As sea levels continue to rise, the city’s largest threat is literally all around us. (New York City News Service)

Don’t pull the emergency brakes on the subway if you’re not at a station. (NY Times)

City Council Member Helen Rosenthal is planning to introduce legislation that would create an Office on Sexual Harassment Prevention inside the mayor’s office. There was a 1993 executive order from Mayor Dinkins, but it was never put into effect. (Gotham Gazette)

77 places to eat outside. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 16, 2019 – The “Maybe NYC is Better Off With An Absentee Mayor?” Edition

The TWA Hotel is open, the best tiki bars in the city, the governor blocks the Williams gas pipeline, a helicopter crashed in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A new bill is looking to ban landlords from using facial recognition technology in their buildings and would allow tenants to pursue civil lawsuits against any landlord who did. (Gothamist)

You’ve got four chances to check out Manhattanhenge this summer, starting in two weeks. (amNY)

By the time you read this, there’s a good chance that our dummy of a mayor has decided to not listen to New Yorkers, or his friends, or common sense, or the rest of the country, and launched his presidential bid on Good Morning America. Maybe the city will be better off if he’s never around? (Splinter)

The City Council wants to provide the NYPD with more funding for the understaffed Collision Investigation Squad to investigate the 2,000 – 3,000 fatal crashes annually, of which they respond to just over 5% of. James O’Neill, NYPD commissioner, isn’t interested. (Streetsblog)

A dump truck driver struck and killed a 58-year-old man while he was crossing W. 21st Street in Coney Island on Saturday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The TWA Hotel is open in all its retro glory. (Curbed)

More photos from inside the TWA Hotel. (6sqft)

Has the TWA Hotel truly opened if there was not a list of ten fun facts about it? (Untapped Cities)

New York City is nothing without its eccentricities, including Washington Square Park’s Bubble Man, Stephen Duncan. (GVSHP)

The best happy hours in Brooklyn. (The Infatuation)

There are over 1.6 million feet of sidewalk sheds in the city, and now there’s an interactive map to keep tabs on them all. (Viewing NYC)

Over 120,000 New Yorkers rely on the MTA’s Acess-A-Ride to get around the city, but just because they rely on it, it doesn’t mean it’s at all reliable. (NY Times)

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, except when it comes to the big dumb idiots at Big Seven Travel, which declared the Boston Accent “sexier” than the New York accent. (Patch)

A look at Cafe Phin, the city’s only authentic Vietnamese coffee roaster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will no longer accept gifts from the human monsters of the Sackler family, architects of the country’s opioid crisis. (NY Times)

The gala honoring Brazil’s president and the man who is so outwardly homophobic it wouldn’t be a shock if he was secretly gay himself Jair Bolsonaro happened without his presence, but not without interruptions and protests. (Gothamist)

How did the subway lines get their letters or numbers? Let’s take a look. (amNY)

LaGuardia and JFK are nowhere near the top-ranked airports in the world, which is no shock to anyone who has the dubious pleasure of traveling through them. (Patch)

Don’t look now, but the company responsible for Northside Festival and Brooklyn Magazine, which had held tens of thousands of dollar from former employees, seems to have ghosted. The website for the festival says the 2019 information is “coming soon.” (Gothamist)

Check out the architectural finalists for the city’s Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC competition, which challenged firms to design affordable housing on small lots across the city. (Curbed)

A “severely decomposed” body was found in the basement of a Brooklyn Heights building by maintenance workers. An NYPD investigation is ongoing. (Bklyner)

Marijuana isn’t legal for recreational use, but that hasn’t stopped the state legislature from moving on to “important” issues like trying to make texting or using or looking at any portable electronic device while crossing the road punishable by fines. (Gothamist)

A helicopter operated by “the Uber of helicopters” Blade landed in the Hudson River on Wednesday with no serious injuries or deaths, so it’s safe to watch the videos of it all going down without guilt. (Gothamist)

Non-profit internet service provider and privacy-friendly company NYC Mesh is expanding its service to Greenpoint. (Greenpointers)

Governor Cuomo’s administration blocked the Williams gas pipeline that would terminate just off the Rockaways, pointing out it would result in a failure to meet the state’s water quality standards. The company plans on reapplying, but with the governor’s focus on environmental issues, the chance of approval seems very low. (Politico)

The absolute best places for tiki drinks in the city. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for August 2, 2018 – New Ferry Routes, Turnstile Jumping Policy Change, $2,000 Pizza, and More

A new bill will try to defend the SHSAT from Mayor de Blasio, the West Village’s serial farter is back, NYPD parking in bike lanes, two new ferry routes will debut this month, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

A new bill would preserve the SHSAT, which the mayor signaled out as something he wanted to eliminate in order to boost racial diversity within the city’s eight specialized high schools.

Curbed lays out the case for congestion pricing.

The West Village’s serial farter has returned!

Robert Martinez was killed when a tire came off a private sanitation truck and hit his 2003 Chevy Tracker. The sanitation company, Century Waste Services, has a spotty safety record, cited 76 times since 2016 for a number of safety concerns including “loose and/or missing” wheel fasteners in February.

New ferry routes will launch at the end of the month. The Soundview route will launch August 15 and stop at Clason Point Park, E 90th St, # 34th St and Wall St/Pier 11. The Lower East Side Route launches August 29 and will stop at Wall St/Pier 11, Corlears Hook, Stuvesant Cove, and Long Island City.

The Bronx’s four new Metro North Stations that are coming to Co-op City, Parkchester, Morris Park, and Hunts Point have taken a step closer to becoming a reality.

10 secrets of Washington Square Park, from 6sqft.

Great Jones Cafe has no plans to reopen after owner Jim Moffett’s death last month.

This year’s ridiculously priced food item is Industry Kitchen’s $2,000 pizza. If you’re looking to eat an average month’s rent for a one-bedroom in Red Hook, this is your pizza.

The Bronx’s NYPD Capt. Emilio Melendez was caught on video destroying a sidewalk memorial. While not illegal, it certainly won’t help build bridges with the neighborhood.

Filming around town: Blue Bloods w/Donnie Wahlberg is at Dobbins and Nassau Ave, Crashing w/Pete Holmes is at W 3rd and 6th, Manifest w/Josh Dallas is at 39 Ave and 212 St in Queens, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel w/Rachel Brosnahan is at Montaque St and Hicks St in Brooklyn, Instinct w/Alan Cumming is at 70th Ave and Juno St in Forest Hills, and Law and Order: SVU is at Centre St and Chambers St.

Porch Life, a public art project from Music Box Village, is bringing a musical architecture installation to the Coney Island boardwalk this weekend.

The final season of Anthony Bourdain’s ‘Parts Unknown’ will air this fall, including an episode dedicated to the Lower East Side and the East Village.

The NYPD will no longer arrest people who jump subway turnstiles who already have an open summons as of August 1. The new policy dictates the officers will issue a second summons.

City Councilmember Ruben Diaz Sr. avoided a fine for misusing government resources by promising to stop using his work email address to send his opinionated newsletters.

What is the point of the city installing bike lanes if the NYPD not only won’t enforce cars blocking them, but regularly park there themselves?

French artist JR has a new mural at the corner of Great Jones and Bowery.

50 outdoor art installations not to miss in August, according to Untapped Cities.

“I’m not a Queens bitch, I’m a Bronx bitch.” –Malikah George, while taking a plea deal for crashing her car, fleeing the scene, and hand off her one-year-old to a stranger.


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