The Briefly for June 22, 2020 – The “An Answer to Our Collective Fireworks Question” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC starts reopening phase two, Tuesday is primary day, the only true New Yorker, an NYPD cop uses an illegal chokehold, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

A boy caught a 20-pound catfish in Central Park using a bagel as bait. When we have conversations about who is a “real” New Yorker, this catfish deserves to be a part of the conversation. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Tuesday is a 2020 primary in New York for much more than the Democratic presidential nominee. Here’s your guide to the local races. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you applied for an absentee ballot and it hasn’t arrived, here’s what to do. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

This weekend was the breaking point based on everyone in the city going to Twitter to complain about fireworks. Firework complaints are up 230x in June. What the hell is going on? (Sydney Pereira, Beth Fertig, David Cruz, Jake Dobkin, and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there’s a real answer to what the hell is going on. According to Dave Hill, all of the fireworks shows in the Northeast have been canceled and fireworks vendors are up to their ears in pro-grade fireworks. Thanks to supply and demand, dealers have turned to the black market and are trying to unload their fireworks for any price. (@DaveHill77)

“Everywhere I go it smells the same, and it smells like my breath.” Let’s check-in with David Sedaris. (Sarah Lyall for NY Times)

A guide to phase two’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Phase two means something big: Offices are open once more. If companies decide to reopen their offices? That’s a different story. (Michael Gold and Troy Closson for NY Times)

A 1.9-acre waterfront park and small beach is coming to the Bushwick Inlet Park, which was approved by the Parks and Waterfront Committee of Brooklyn’s Community Board 1. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a piece of history off the beaten path? Check out Jackie Robinson’s house on Tilden Ave. (Untapped New York for Michelle Young)

After 96 days, Governor Cuomo’s daily press conferences have come to an end. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Half of New York’s working-class immigrants have lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study by the Center for Urban Future. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

How many days has it been since the passing of the Eric Garner Chokehold Ban? An NYPD officer was suspended without pay after being caught on video using an illegal chokehold on an unarmed Black man in Queens. (Mark Hallum and Zach Gewelb for amNewYork Metro)

86.4% of tickets for biking on the sidewalk in 2018 and 2019 went to Black and Hispanic New Yorkers, even though they comprise only 49 percent of cyclists. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Dominique Alexander was found hanging from a tree last week in Fort Tryon Park in Manhattan, his death was ruled a suicide. Alexander’s death is one of many deaths of Black men that have been ruled a suicide after being found hanging from trees. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There were reports of three nooses being hung in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx on Juneteenth. The NYPD declined to open an investigation, claiming the ropes were nothing more than harmless string. This is the second investigation into a noose left in a city park that the NYPD has refused or closed without a thorough investigation. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Vincent D’Andraia, the cop that was suspended for showing a protester to the ground and was charged with misdemeanor assault has a history of 11 allegations of misconduct since 2015. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Students at predominantly Black New York City schools are significantly less likely to have a positive view of school police or to believe school discipline is applied fairly. If that’s your assumption, there’s a new study that confirms your assumption. (Jessica Gould, Alex Zimmerman, and Gabrielle LaMarr LeMee and Gothamist)

New York City’s education oversight board is calling for public schools, not the police, to manage the officers stationed on city campuses. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

“The Case for Self-Enforcing Streets” from Transportation Alternatives argues that the NYPD should be removed from traffic enforcement, calling for an expansion in enforcement technology, changing how crash investigations work, and more. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Hundreds of protesters marched on Astoria Blvd in Queens demanding the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The American Museum of Natural History expressed plans to have the statue of Theodore Roosevelt removed from its entrance on Central Park West for its racist depictions of Native American and African figures. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

While we’re talking about statues, let’s encourage the Long Island town of Babylon to tear down their statue of Robert Moses. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

“Mayor de Blasio could have acted all along. He could have called for the NYPD to make officers’ disciplinary records public. He could have fired Officer Pantaleo immediately after he murdered Eric Garner. Mayor de Blasio knows how this all works, but benefits from the opaqueness that characterizes the political system in this city and state. He has amplified the problem with the system.”
-New Kings Democrats, Mayor de Blasio is neither progressive nor effective. He needs to resign

Juneteenth will become a city holiday in 2021. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Photos: Juneteenth celebrations across the city. (Sophia Chang, photos by Angela Chalmondeley, Khaleeq Alfred, and Gretchen Robinette for Gothamist)

NYC Parks installed “Juneteenth Grove” at Cadman Plaza Park “in celebration of Juneteenth and to celebrate the homegoing of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and countless others.” (Mary Kim for Brooklyn Heights Blog)

Downtown Brooklyn and Park Slope are getting new bike lanes this summer on Smith St, Fourth Ave, and Navy Street. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Another week and another local racist caught on camera. This time it was in Flushing Queens where a man with a face mask pulled down yelled slurs at a South Korean student inside a 7-Eleven. The NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s been 63 years since the legendary brawl at the Copacabana that involved six hall of fame Yankees and their wives while celebrating Billy Martin’s birthday. Finally, the truth has come out. (David Margolick for NY Times)

The Yankees and Mets have announced that their, uh, “spring” training will be happening in New York and not Florida. (Priscila Korb for Patch)

Is wearing a mask getting in your way of drinking? Check out Crook & Marker’s TasteMask, which includes a flap for a straw. (Bao Ong for The Out)

Thanks to reader Hannah for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 3, 2020 – The “Does Anyone Know Who is in Charge?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A focus on multiple ways that the mayor seems to have abandoned his leadership role and abdicated control of his city and more

Today – Low: 66˚ High: 81˚
Heavy rain until evening.

Request an absentee ballot before June 16
Click and sign support for the repeal of 50-a
Donate to The Equal Justice Initiative and The Bail Project

The city remains on PAUSE, with 5/7 metrics met. We are expected to start phase one on June 8.

The recording of the NYPD on their radios saying “Shoot the motherf*****rs,” talking about protestors in Brooklyn.

The 8 pm curfew is now upon us, but it’s not the first time the city has been under curfew. Here are ten times New York City was under curfew. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped Cities)

Can restaurant delivery workers deliver food after curfew? Will people stocking shelves overnight be stopped and asked for paperwork? The state’s documentation says there are “no specific requirements for ID” when it comes to essential workers. It’s almost like this wasn’t well thought out. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

“I’d rather die than live in a world where this kind of violence is normalized. I’ll jump in front of a million police cars if I have to.” -Devin Khan, who was one of the protesters holding the barricade in front of an NYPD SUV on continued marching. (Virginia Breen for The City)

Who really runs the city? Yes, Bill de Blasio is our current mayor, but in his press conference on Tuesday, Governor Cuomo commented that he would be within his power to “displace” the mayor using emergency powers. If that wasn’t already a troubling enough statement, he also mentioned that the NYPD should use all 38,000 officers. For reference, there were 8,000 officers on duty last night. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Satire (or is it?): “De Blasio: ‘It Is An Honor To Have My Daughter Doxxed By The Greatest Police Force In The World’ (The Onion)

What will Mayor de Blasio say today when it comes to violence across the city? The mayor has shifted the blame on a daily basis. First, it was “out of town” agitators, then it was anarchists, then it was gangs and career criminals. On Tuesday he asked local leaders to “stand up for peace,” after it has become clear that his current approach of “the police will figure this out” is not working out. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Speaker Corey Johnson announced that the City Council will vote to finally make the chokehold illegal in June with a veto-proof majority and the mayor’s opinion does not matter. Under the bill, any technique that restricts the flow of air” will be a misdemeanor. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

When the NYPD wanted Citi Bike and Revel to shut down, the mayor obliged and sent the order. The directive arrived at 10:30 pm on Moday, 30 minutes before the curfew. On Tuesday, Citi Bikes started shutting down before 6 pm. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

New York City legally requires people arrested see a judge within 24 hours. It’s been that way for nearly 30 years. People arrested during the weekend’s protests spent over 24 hours in Manhattan without seeing a judge. To quote the president o the New York State Court Officers’ Association, “Everything is f*****d up.” (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

“Covering protests, especially chaotic ones, has always been tough. Reporters are used to getting jostled, taunted, and sometimes threatened with arrest. And while the level of aggression has been increasing in the last decade, the number of attacks of the past few days is far beyond anything we have ever seen before.”
– Judy Patrick, VP for editorial content at the New York Press Association for amNewYork Metro, Be outraged over police attacks on journalists in America

Black New Yorkers Talk About Their Fear in Public Space (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

New York Civil Rights Law section 50-A is a state law, the mayor’s support or non-support of its repeal means nothing, but that hasn’t stopped him from talking out of both sides of his mouth about it. He says he supports repeal but he is been responsible for its expansion since taking office. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A new report from the city’s Commission to Combat Police Corruption shows the NYPD’s disciplinary system regularly protects bad cops, including 11 of the 45 cases where the cops involved should have been fired. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Pride Month started with a vigil in Sheridan Square to remember LBTQ people of color lost to police violence as well as other Black Americans who died at the hands of police. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

“Opting to stay silent only suggests that [James] Dolan is compliant with the police brutality and systemic racism that has plagued the cultural landscape of this nation — a tone-deaf action considering his general manager is black and all but one of the players on the Knicks’ roster is black.”
Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro, Knicks owner James Dolan’s silence is part of the problem

There is a narrative that the looting that has accompanied protests is undermining the message, as this piece from amNewYork Metro’s Editor-In-Chief supposes. The way that looting is covered that undermines the message of the protests, not the looting. Yes, you’ll find photos of shattered windows and ransacked stores if you look for it, but you’ll also find photos of people in the streets whose hearts are broken and spirits have sustained much more damage than any building. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

There are always people looking to pervert the message of a protest. The owners of a Staten Island restaurant owners want to open early because people are violating social distancing rules at protests. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

The owner of the Nets, Joe Tsai, has agreed to extend his pledge to pay Barclays Center workers beyond its original date, paying 2,000 part-time workers. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Project)

Inside a $16,000 Covid-19 renovation of Christie & Co. Salon in Bayside. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

Apartment Porn: A $2.3 million penthouse with a roof deck with a view of Billionaire’s Row. A perfect opportunity if you’re dying to regularly moon Billionaire’s Row. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at some of the work of Shelley Seccombe, a photographer who has documented the Greenwich Village waterfront since 1970. (Louisa Winchell for GVSHP)

The free food fridge in Bed-Stuy, set up by Thadeaus Umpster, is inspiring similar acts of kindness across the city. (Angely Mercado for Brooklyn Based)

Governor Cuomo will allow day camps to open on June 29th, including camps in the city. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

RIP Patricia Reed Scott, who helped bring TV and film production back to the city in the 80s and 90s. (Sam Roberts for NY Times)

Meghan McCain says her Manhattan neighborhood was “eviscerated.” But also? She’s a liar. What a doofus. (David Moye for HuffPost)

“If I didn’t have a primary, I wouldn’t care.” Congressperson Eliot Engel, who represents portions of the Bronx and Westchester, is a dipshit and is being challenged by Jamaal Bowman in the June 23 election. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Click here to request an absentee ballot for the June 23, 2020 election and primary. Do this before June 16.

Information on the NYPD’s shooting of an armed man in response to gunfire in Crown Heights. (Edgar Sandoval and Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs for NY Times)

The Metropolitan Opera canceled the rest of their performances for 2020 through New Year’s Eve. (Michael Cooper for NY Times)

10 organizations supporting the Black Lives Matter movement in NYC. (6sqft)

Thanks to reader Mike for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 22, 2020 – The “The Beaches Will Be Open This Weekend” Memorial Day Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A new plan for Long Island City, a threat to SantaCon, Scarr’s Pizza and McSorley return, late-night fireworks, restaurant reopenings to celebrate, and more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 69˚
Possible drizzle in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 65˚

Do you have blood? Can you spare some? The city’s blood supply is running “dangerously low.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What are you doing to experience new things while staying at home? SNL’s Heidi Gardner is trying a new cereal each week. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

If the ban on city dwellers continues, City Council Member Keith Powers has threatened to cancel SantaCon and ban Long Islanders from St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Please? Will you promise? (Adam Nichols for Patch)

After a week of back and forth, the city’s beaches will be open this weekend, but with no lifeguards and swimming won’t be allowed. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Nathan’s is the biggest game in Coney Island hot dogs right now, but they got there by playing dirty. Coney Island’s original hot dogger is Feltman’s. (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

McSorley’s is back after its longest closure since opening in 1854. (EV Grieve)

Scarr’s Pizza is back too. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Archdiocese of NY shared a “Faith Forward” plan, which outlines a five-step plan to reopen New York’s churches. (Ron Lee for NY1)

Religious institutions can begin holding services, assuming they limit occupancy to ten or fewer people indoors, everyone must wear a mask and follow social distancing protocols. (NY1)

Some suggested Memorial Day reading, care of the city’s independent book shops. (Danielle Valente for Time Out)

The mayor ran for office on the idea that he wanted to bridge the gap between the two New York Cities, but if you look at the neighborhoods that have received open streets and those that have not, he’s continuing in the tradition he rallied against by denying some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods by the Covid-19 virus open spaces. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

State Assemblymember Carmen Arroyo has been removed from the Democratic primary ballot after being caught altering signatures and dates on her petition to remain on the ballot. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Central Park Park Ranger Ashley Whited rescued a team of orphaned ducks after a snapping turtle attacked and killed their mother. (Anthony Pascale for NY1)

The pandemic has shown what has always been possible, including to-go drinks from bars and restaurants. State Senator Brad Hoylman introduced legislation that would allow bars and restaurants to sell to-go drinks for two years after the pandemic is over. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

This weekend kicks off the Loisaida Festival, digitally of course. (EV Grieve)

Here’s the latest plan from a giant developer for the “future” of Long Island City, leaning heavily on commercial property, with 10-to-12 million square feet of space on 28 acres of land surrounding the area that Amazon HQ2 never was. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Big companies like Facebook and Mastercard are rethinking massive leases in Manhattan after allowing employees to work remotely on an ongoing basis. Facebook is or was close to signing a lease int he Farley Post Office building next to Penn Station, so it remains to be seen if they’ll go through with the deal. I guess you could say it’s complicated 🥴. (Danielle Balbi for The Real Deal)

Video: Climbing to the top of the Woolworth Building, in what appears to be less than legal means. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The mayor says the city could be on its way to start phase one of reopening in the first half of June. This is, of course, not a guarantee, and we’ll have to see how well the city fares during this holiday weekend as temperatures are looking favorable. One spike and we ain’t opening in June. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

I don’t know if it’s welcome news, but it’s a step towards normalcy. Beginning on Monday, you can file lawsuits electronically for the first time in multiple weeks. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

A guide to New York’s contact tracing programs. (Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

With the rise of MIS-C cases in the state, Governor Cuomo hasn’t made a decision about summer camps across the state, but it’s looking less likely. (Zack Fink for NY1)

176,000 students will be attending summer school, but it won’t be in person. The governor canceled in-person summer classes. The governor went as far as to say that it’s in question if schools will reopen in the fall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved an $8 million project to install a new pedestrian plaza beneath Brooklyn Bridge Park, which will replace a fenced-in parking lot, which is there today. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What is New York without New York bars? (Megan Abbott for NY Times)

Ridership is on an uptick, so the Staten Island ferry will increase its rush-hour service. (NY1)

Fleet Week is still happening… virtually? (Ron Lee for NY1)

15 restaurants and bars that have permanently closed because of the coronavirus. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This shouldn’t be a surprise, but that all-male restaurant panel the president has convened, which called him “one of us,” ain’t gonna help. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here are the CDC’s guidance on using cloth face coverings. (Norwood News)

Is this NYC’s oldest manhole cover? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

* Seinfeld voice* What’s the deal with all these late-night fireworks? (David Cruz for Gothamist)

8 restaurant reopenings to be excited about this week. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Thank you to reader Shiloh for today’s featured photo!