The Briefly for February 12, 2019 – The “Sometimes You Need To Look at Photos of Dogs” Edition

Congestion pricing and legal recreational marijuana get real, the mayor won’t act on parking placard abuse, but the City Council will, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you haven’t gone outside yet, today’s weather is going to be miserable. (Patch)

Take a look inside Seth Meyers’ apartment. (Curbed)

The story behind the Harriet Tubman Memorial “Swing Low” on 122nd Street. (6sqft)

Photos from The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. You know you can’t resist. (Gothamist)

It’s 0.0000797113 of an acre on the corner of Seventh Ave and Christopher Street and if you don’t look down at the right moment you’ll miss a significant piece of defiant private property that defines the spirit of the Village. (NY Times)

There is a 2017 city law that dictates that all entrances used by pedestrians must have visible numbers. Over 53% of buildings on 42nd Street are missing numbers. City Councilmember Jumaane Williams introduced the law and is tired of selective enforcement. (amNY)

The five oldest buildings in Manhattan. (Untapped Cities)

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s public school report that addresses segregation in education is released. Now that his crutch of talking about how the report is coming has been removed, the mayor has to actually do something, which is not his strong suit. (NY Times)

New York will likely lose a seat in the House of Representatives in 2020, and New York Democrats could redraw Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ district to remove her from Congress. If AOC is asked to leave with such a large national profile, she could target Chuck Schumer’s senate seat in 2022. (The Intercept)

Getting a tattoo in a subway car? Unless you love staph infections, it’s not a great idea. Maybe that’s why TuffCity Tattoo created a replica car. (Untapped Cities)

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the New York Public Library has released an interactive map of fictional love in the city. (6sqft)

CatVideoFest is shockingly not happening in Williamsburg or Bushwick. (Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo’s transportation deputy unveiled their latest proposal for congestion pricing. Implementation would go into effect in 2021 and any vehicle going into the “central business district” in Manhattan would be charged roughly $11.52, no matter where you enter. There will be no business exemption and the funds will be put into a “lockbox” for the MTA. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

McNally Jackson is staying in SoHo. They’re not moving, but they’re opening two new stores in City Point in Brooklyn and the South Street Seaport. (The Real Deal)

Upstate says they’ll take Amazon HQ2 if we don’t want it. Maybe the Syracuse-Rochester corridor forgets that Amazon has to want to be there. (NY Post)

“We have reminded the folks there that we are still here” New Jersey also would take HQ2, but Governor Phil Murphy said it in the saddest way possible. (NY Post)

Ruben Diaz Sr, noted homophobe and city council member, says that he is the victim in this story. (Patch)

Curbed is hiring a full-time, junior-level reporter. (Curbed)

Kings Plaza Shopping Center, the site of the large fire that injured over 20 people in September of last year, continues to receive fines for illegally storing cars. Their latest fine could be $25,000, their second in the last six months. (Brooklyn Paper)

You haven’t missed the news. The jury in the El Chapo trial are still deliberating. (NY Post)

Here are the city’s 20 most dangerous one-lane intersections for pedestrians and cyclists. (Localize.city)

The L train mystery odor is one week old and it has two new siblings. Joining the party is a thick fog and the smell of rubbing alcohol. The smell appears to be permeating the subways into nearby apartments. (Gothamist)

The City Council unveiled multiple bills that would mandate proactive enforcement and increase oversight of parking placard abuse. One bill would ban city vehicles from blocking crosswalks, fire hydrants, sidewalks, bike lanes and bus lanes unless there is an emergency. It’s maddening that this is currently legal. (Patch)

According to the state budget: Recreational marijuana will come with three taxes. $1 per dry weight gram of flower and $0.25 per gram of trim, 20% sales tax and a 2% local sales tax. You would be able to grow and process up to six plants on private property, using it would be illegal except for private property and can’t take it across state lines. (amNY)

A gym teacher in Brooklyn was fired for playing Fortnite with his students. (NY Post)

HUD administrator Lynne Patton’s stunt of living in different NYCHA buildings for the next four weeks has already been proven to be a farce. (NY Post)

The mayor is so sure that he’s such done a great job that he’s headed to New Hampshire to continue flirting with running for president. (NY Post)

Where to eat near Grand Central.

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The Briefly for January 31, 2019 – The “Amazon Threatens to Walk” Edition

Mayor de Blasio won’t stop talking about his fired staffer, the Winterfest saga continues, the unwilling public advocate candidate and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Winterfest organizer Lena Romanova used a pseudonym to harass vendors and the press. Complaints against Winterfest are being reviewed by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Brooklyn Assemblywoman Latrice Walker is a candidate for Public Advocate, even if she doesn’t want to be. (Gothamist)

Amazon plans to sponsor computer science classes in more than 130 of the city’s high schools. (TechCrunch)

Amazon executives have expressed frustration in private at their treatment in New York and made veiled threats of walking from their Long Island City plans during a three hour city council meeting. Maybe some computer classes weren’t enough to win over the long list of groups who are against HQ2. (NY Times)

Reminder: Google is building a $1 billion campus with no bargained tax breaks from the city or state. (NY Mag)

A ranked list of the city’s best matzoh ball soups. (Grub Street)

Watch a snowstorm kick the city’s ass for 30 minutes in this 29 second time-lapse. (@mattmfm)

The MoMA PS1 Skyspace is closed while the 5 Pointz construction obstructs a view of the sky that’s supposed to be completely unimpeded. (Curbed)

Take a look at the photo of the guy reviewing the place and ask yourself “Does this man look like he would enjoy himself a Taco Bell that serves booze?” (NY Post’s uptight Steve Cuozzo)

The city released a draft of Gowanus’ rezoning. Just try not to think about the decades old toilet that’s currently running through the neighborhood. (6sqft)

Watch the Queens president Melinda Katz’ State of the Borough 2019 address. (Melinda Katz)

A very small number of the 30,000 New Yorkers eligible for half priced MetroCards have signed up for the Fair Fares program. (Gothamist)

The city’s high school dropout rate hit a record low in 2018. (Chalkbeat)

How to watch next week’s the public advocate debate. (amNY)

“We’re not happy with the service. And we do owe the public an apology” MTA president Pat Foye. Pat Foye wins this week’s “no shit” award. (NY Post)

Mayor de Blasio can’t stop digging himself deeper when it come to his former aide fired after sexual harassment accusations. Now he’s blaming the governor of Montana. (NY Post)

16 date night restaurants in the East Village. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 18, 2019 – The “L Train Shutdown is Officially 100% Dead” Edition

This weekend’s threatening weather, the scheduled weekend subway changes and cancellations, Westsider Books might not be closing, the NYPD spied on Black Lives Matter, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A holiday weekend plus a winter storm? What could go wrong with the subways? Here are the subway closures and changes of service scheduled for this weekend. (6sqft)

THE L TRAIN SHUTDOWN IS OFFICIALLY DEAD! (amNY)

Here’s what’s next for the L train non-shutdown. (NY Times)

Here are the street closure’s for Saturday’s Women’s Marches. (6sqft)

Time to watch The Empire Strikes Back, because all your Hoth jokes are going to be relevant this weekend. (Gothamist)

The weather this week may be unbearable outside, but a NYCHA housing development in East Williamsburg is one of many developments without heat or hot water this week. (Bushwick Daily)

Chain store volume saw the first ever year-over-year decline since the number has been tracked. No wonder the Upper West Side was rallying to save a Starbucks. (GVSHP)

Case in point: the Kohl’s in Rego Park will close due to real estate and operational cost. (TimesLedger)

The Right to Disconnect bill, which would have made it illegal to be punished for not responding to after-hours communications, is being blocked by Mayor de Blasio. (NY Post)

Take a peek at the private pool, gym, and views from the first residential tower of the Hudson Yards megaproject. (Curbed)

James Turrell’s “Meeting” at MoMA PS1 is supposed to give an unimpeded view of the sky, something extremely rare in the city. How rare is it? New developments are now impeding the skyspace piece. (Gothamist)

Made in New York allegedly swiped the recipe for Prince Street Pizza’s famous spicy pepperoni slice, but it does not hold up against the original. (Eater)

While rare, the leucistic grackle that has been seen in Central Park isn’t going to be stealing the social media attention away from the Mandarin Duck. Why? Because leucistic grackle sounds like some kind of throat disease. (Gothamist)

Are we the bedbug capital of America? Hardly. New York lands at #6 behind Baltimore, DC, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Columbus. (Gothamist)

The Gowanus Canal EPA cleanup hit a wall and can’t move forward until the federal shutdown comes to a close. (Brooklyn Paper)

New Yorkers stand to lose $500 million a month in benefits if the federal shutdown continues into February, which will turn into a real humanitarian crisis. (Curbed)

Black Lives Matter activists were spied on by the police, who called protestors “idiots” while bragging about all the overtime they were receiving, according to newly released emails from the NYPD. (NY Post)

Westsider Books might not be closing after all. A Go Fund Me sprung up to save the bookstore and owner Dorian Thornley stated if he could raise $50,000 he would consider staying open. After one day, the campaign is close to $37,000. (6sqft)

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez made her first floor speech on Thursday. (Welcome2TheBronx)

A bit more about the super blood wolf moon lunar eclipse, or “goth moon,” this weekend. (Time Out)

Hussain Jawad of Queens was charged with murder, assault and criminal possession of a weapon after allegedly stabbing his wife to death and slashing his teenage daughter. His motive is unknown and his daughter is in stable condition. (NY Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s 34,160 affordable homes built or preserved in 2018 is an impressive number, but not to the Coalition for the Homeless. Only 16% of those apartments were designated for the homeless and those making under 30% of median income, $21k. (Gothamist)

Five ways to your hot chocolate on. (amNY)

15 proposals not in Governor Cuomo’s State of the State speech. (Gotham Gazette)

East River Park will be buried… so it can be saved. (NY Times)

The best spots for ramen in the city. (Thrillist)

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