The Briefly for April 16, 2019 – The “Birds Are Cool and Trash Pandas are Getting Vaccinated” Edition

The city’s fight again measles continues with a preschool shutdown, a pipeline threatens Rockaway Beach, New York pizza in the Virgin Islands, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

CompStat, the focus of a recent ReplyAll episode, is being blamed in a $70 million lawsuit by a Brooklyn family against the NYPD for harassment and a false arrest. (Daily News)

The MTA can tout percentages of trains that have had improving performance, but the truth of the matter is that Monday morning’s commute was a nightmare for the A, C, E, F, M, J, and G trains. (Gothamist)

Now that birds are as cool as a street corner shaved ice, here are sixteen of the best bird-watching spots in the city. (Curbed)

Webster Hall is reopening this month and the first show was announced: Jay-Z. (BrooklynVegan)

This makes no small claim, but Eater has a profile of the women who make New York’s “most perfect tortillas.” (Eater)

107 years (and a day) after the Titanic sunk and 21 years after Kate Winslet let Leonardo DiCaprio die, here are ten city sites that connect New York to the sunken ship. (6sqft)

Ten places to visit in the city for a “small town” feel. (Untapped Cities)

President Trump’s executive order expediting gas pipelines is hitting close to home, with the Williams Northeast Supply Enhancement, which is proposed to run from Pennsylvania and terminate close to Rockaway Beach. Opponents say the project will threaten the harbor and marine life in the area. (QNS)

New York may have been able to fight off Amazon, but Jeff Bezos is still eyeing property. Rumor is he’s looking to spend $60 million on a new apartment, which would be a few blocks from other apartments he owns. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The death of Nipsey Hussle inspired a march for peace over with hundreds of current and former gang members in the South Bronx. (Gothamist)

The second-tallest building in the Western Hemisphere is moving forward. The building will require special permits, but if it’s allowed it will be 1,556 feet tall and the 18th “supertall” tower to be constructed in the last dozen years. (6qsft)

What is the cost of a measles outbreak? A single outbreak can cost an individual nearly $10,000 and more than $5 million for a community. (The Indicator from Planet Money)

The city shut down a preschool program at a Brooklyn yeshiva for violating the Health Department order that requires them to have a corrective action plan for measles. (NY Times)

A lawsuit claims that the measles outbreak in the city isn’t an emergency and demanding a restraining order on the mayor’s mandatory vaccination rule that went into effect last Tuesday. There have been 285 confirmed measles cases in Williamsburg since October. (Gothamist)

If your day has been stressful, take a moment to watch Maxine the Fluffy Corgi fight to stay awake while riding the subway. (Viewing NYC)

While new explicitly New York, it is New York pizza related. The best restaurant in the U.S. Virgin Islands is a New York pizza food truck boat in Christmas Cove. (Atlas Obscura)

All seven BQE rehab plans, explained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

City Winery, which will lose its current location when Disney’s offices eat the West Village, will have a new home in early 2020 at Hudson River Park’s Pier 57. (Eater)

Brooklyn Bride Park’s spring and summer lineup was announced, including a kite festival, the MET Opera, stargazing, a more. (Bklyner)

The Met Museum’s new rooftop installation “Parapivot” touches on the interstellar, Manhattan’s grid, and is meant to invoke a connection to “the multiverse above and around us, too.” (amNY)

No one wants to pay full price, and that includes State Senator Andrew Gounardes. Gounardes is arguing that Brooklyn residents who frequent the Verrazzano bridge should receive a discount. The discount for Staten Island residents was put in place because it seemed unfair to charge full price for every single way to get in or out of the borough. There are many roads in and out of Brooklyn. (Bklyner)

Here’s a stunning time-lapse of the Manhattan skies after a snowstorm. (Scott Segler)

The NYCHA’s inspection of 135,000 apartments for lead hazards begun this week. At the current rate, the inspections are scheduled to end before 2020. The mayor has not appointed a new NYCHA chair since the deadline passed on April 1. (amNY)

Portions of the city’s trash panda population will be vaccinated for rabies. No lawsuits are expected as a result of the vaccine implementation. (Gothamist)

The American Museum of Natural History canceled the gala that would have honored Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s asshole president. Sorry Brazil, we can only deal with one asshole president at a time. (Gothamist)

Lyft plans on integrating Citi Bikes into the main Lyft app starting in May, which will allow you to pay for your bike and ride in one app. It’s also a good way to educate New Yorkers that Lyft owns Motivate, Citi Bike’s parent company. (Patch)

It was the parents and not City Hall that successfully desegregated schools in District 3 and 15 when the city seemed to be incapable of doing so while the rest of the city’s education system remains one of the most segregated in the nation. (NY Times)

After three deaths on construction sites this week the City Council is pushing for the implementation of a construction safety training law passed in 2017. (Queens Crap)

The best Omakase sushi in the city, ranked by price. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for April 3, 2019 – The “Ghosting Capital of the World” Edition

The plastic bag ban may birth a paper bag fee, New Yorkers disapprove of congestion pricing, Irving Plaza will temporarily close, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

Bay Ridge’s greatest Italian hero is vegan? Sacrilege! (Eater)

With the eventual plastic bag ban taking place next year, the city is also considering a $0.05 fee for paper bags to benefit the NYC Environmental Protection Fund and go towards giving low-income New Yorkers and the elderly reusable bags for free. (Gothamist)

New York City is the capital of ghosting. 41% of New Yorkers say they’ve been ghosted, higher than any of the other 48 cities surveyed. (Time Out)

The Zagat guide book is coming back for New York City and your vote matters, much like participatory budgeting. You voted for participatory budgeting, right? (NY Times)

Here’s how the new mansion tax will affect luxury real estate. (Curbed)

The 10 best spots for plant classes. (6sqft)

We’re #1! #1 in the highest chunk of our paychecks that go towards taxes. (Patch)

Chanel Lewis is guilty of the 2016 killing of Karina Vetrano. It was Lewis’s second trial. (Gothamist)

Yesterday was one of six Gender Pay Gap days, and in New York, the gap has only gotten worse. (Gothamist)

The Tony Luke’s Philly cheesesteak has arrived in New York. Is it any good? (Grub Street)

So maybe escape rooms are dangerous if you, you know, can’t actually escape? (Gothamist)

Tracy Morgan got a key to Brooklyn, so what did he do with it? (amNY)

Governor Cuomo got an 11.7% raise this year and will get a 12.5% raise next year and an additional 11% in 2021. Not a bad job to have. (NY Post)

There’s a new chairman and CEO of the MTA, but it’s a little weird the state approved Pat Foye for the job on Monday morning at 2am. (Gothamist)

Governors Island’s 2019 season starts in a month and will have expanded hours and an additional ferry from Manhattan. (Curbed)

The Regional Planning Association has a suggestion to reduce traffic on the section of the BQE that needs repairs: reduce the number of lanes. (Curbed)

Missing from the state’s budget? No, not legal weed. No, not a pied-à-terre tax. No, not a ban on bump stocks. No, not increased oversight. Electric scooters. (Gothamist)

A Quinnipiac University poll shows that 54% of New Yorkers are against congestion pricing. The opposition is highest in the Bronx, where 62% disagree with the passing of the new rules. (NY State of Politics)

Also in the poll is that 57% of those surveyed favor changing admissions to the city’s specialized high schools. (NY Post)

Three alleged MS-13 members have been indicted on murder charges for the shooting death of a man on the 7 train platform on February 3. (Jackson Heights Post)

If you’ve ever stepped into the wrong car assuming it was your Lyft or Uber, you’re not alone. After the death of Samantha L. Josephson, who stepped into the wrong car in South Carolina, City council Speaker Corey Johnson says a bill requiring all for-hire drivers to have illuminated signs in their windows makes sense for NYC. (NY Post)

What’s behind the spike in murders in Brooklyn? (NY Times)

We’re just about to get Webster Hall back and now Irving Plaza announced it will close for eight months later this year for renovations. (BrooklynVegan)

The NYPD’s Inspector General’s Office recommended 42 reforms in a report. Of the 42, six have been implemented, 16 have been outright rejected and the rest sit in limbo. Must be nice to make your own rules. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has suspended the proposed cuts to the FDNY, agreeing to meet with the department and unions to figure out a new deal. (NY Post)

Reports of rapes in the city have seen a slight decrease since last year, the second decrease in the last 18 months. Before December of 2018, the last time reported rapes had decreased was August 2017. (Patch)

The state budget called for a reduction of Special Olympics funding by $50,000, but after the federal government pulled all of its funding the state has reversed its decision. (NY State of Politics)

Where to eat and drink with your human (when you’re a dog). (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for February 22, 2019 – The “Our City’s Parks Are No Longer Rocking” Edition

The 7 train is literally falling apart, the mayor announces a plan to fight placard abuse, the BQX takes another hit, the YMCA, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Nearly every subway line has closures this weekend. (6sqft)

The 7 train is falling apart, literally. A piece of the train tracks fell from its elevated track and impaled an SUV through its windshield. The driver wasn’t injured, but holy shit, is anywhere near the subway safe anymore? (Curbed)

Why we rent and not buy our homes. (StreetEasy)

The mayor announced a goal of moving the parking placard system to license plates from the laminated placards on dashboards. Unless the NYPD enforces the rules, this whole thing is pointless. (Politico)

The NYPD used to hand out hundreds of summonses for sex in the city’s public parks. Last year? Zero. Are New Yorkers no longer horny on main? (NY Times)

The mayor promised serious consequences if yeshivas continue to bar Department of Education inspectors from their buildings. The deadline passed and the city is still negotiating with the schools. (Gothamist)

A map of the mega projects changing the city. (Curbed)

A look inside the new Webster Hall, but no photos of the new bathrooms. (NY Times)

Webster Hall will reopen on May 1 with Patti Smith. (Time Out)

Two more suspects were arrested in connection to the MS-13 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue subway shooting. (NY Post)

The best parodies are barely noticeable, which means you could miss these amazing MTA parody ads if you don’t have a sharp eye. (Bklyner)

Brooklyn President Eric Adams is urging New Yorkers to join their Neighborhood Advisory Boards in order to distribute Community Service Block Grants, a program which dates back to Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The capital of President Trump’s immigration crackdown is New York City with an 88.2% increase in arrests. (Patch)

A list of the 47 hate groups active and operating in the city, double the number from ten years ago. (Patch)

What the hell is the NYPD doing blasting a hip-hop diss track outside the Marcus Garvey Village? A spokesperson said the officers “used it as a way to start a conversation with young men on the street.” Right. (Gothamist)

An 8-month-old in a stroller rolled onto the tracks of the 72nd Street 1 train. Her father jumped onto the tracks and brought her back to safety. The baby went to the hospital with a bump on her head. (amNY)

What’s special about the McBurney Y in Chelsea? Have you ever spelled out “Y.M.C.A.” at a wedding? (Gothamist)

Despite no one wanting him to run, Mayor de Blasio continues to flirt with a presidential run with a trip to Iowa this weekend. (NY Post)

The AARP supports congestion pricing, undercutting critics who say seniors will be hurt by the tolls. (Streetsblog)

Joe Crowley, defeated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is also leaving his position as head of the Queens Democratic Party. June Bunch will serve as the interim chair until a new leader is selected. (NY Post)

Nomkiki Konst, the TV-pundit-turned-candidate for Public Advocate, gets the profile treatment from Politico. (Politico)

If you’ve got three and a half hours to kill, here are 15 minutes interviews with 14 of the city’s Public Advocate candidates. (Gotham Gazette)

Ten candidates for Public Advocate on congestion pricing, safety, transportation policy, bike lanes, and the job in general. (Streetsblog)

An Amazon-less city might be the death-blow to the BQX streetcar. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Just in time for the weekend, 12 hot new brunch places. (Eater)

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