The Briefly for July 16, 2020 – The “She Doesn’t Even Go Here” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor signed the chokehold ban, congestion pricing is dead, the Times asks if the NYPD has given up on investigating shootings, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 77˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

In 2019, the state budget anticipated a January 2021 start for congestion pricing in the city, which would have helped to the tune of $15 billion over five years to help the MTA. What’s the status? Without federal approval, the project is dead. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A look at the six finalists in the Brooklyn Bridge redesign competition, organized by the city and the Van Alen Institute. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A prayer match from Brooklyn to City Hall, led by Black clergy leaders and sold as a community-focused Christian unity event, turned ugly when it was co-opted by the NYPD and Blue Lives Matter protesters. An NYPD union promoted the event as one of their own, perhaps to make it appear like they have community support. An avoidable situation without the NYPD’s meddling. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

NY Times, welcome to the resistance. Today the Times questions if the piles of unsolved shootings across the city, is the NYPD pulling back from its job? The NYPD’s Dermot Shea has a ton of excuses, but ultimately the NYPD made arrests in only 23% of the 634 shootings this year through July 12. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

The NYPD confirmed the dismembered body found in a LES apartment was tech CEO Fahim Saleh. Saleh was the CEO of Gokada, a motorbike-hailing app in Nigeria. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A body was found wrapped in plastic underneath a UHaul blanket on the roof of a McDonald’s in The Bronx on Wednesday morning. The cause of death has yet to be determined. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A deeper look at the federal government’s roadblocks on NYC’s congestion pricing. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

West Indian American Day Carnival is going digital for 2020. (Yannise Jean for The Brooklyn Reader)

When baseball officially returns, gets ready for a very odd extra-inning rule that puts a runner on second base automatically. Listen guys, if you don’t want to play past nine innings, just say so. You don’t have to make up new rules. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The High Line opens to the public today, but with a reservation system and from noon to 8 pm. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Apartment Porn: A $9.4 multi-story Upper East Side penthouse with four terraces, a 24-hour doorman, a built-in library and whatever a “supplemental laundry room” is. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will reopen five days a week starting on August 29. (Peter Libbey for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has a new website to promote and sell PPE manufactured at the Navy Yard. They’ll also be selling them in PPE vending machines at West Elms and Wegmans. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Seems that most people are still paying rent. According to the National Multifamily Housing Council, 88% of tenants are paying rent, down only a percent or two from the same time last year. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

“The only reason you’re out here is because you feel guilty.” City Councilmember Stephen Levin’s meeting with his constituents in McCarren Park to explain his “yes” vote on the city’s budget probably didn’t go as he planned. (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

The Empire Center for Public Policy plans to take the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to court for allegedly violating the Freedom of Information Act for failure hand over payroll records of MTA cops. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Robert Bolden is still in the hospital for long-term heart damage after being shot with a stun gun by the NYPD and for multiple fractures to his humerus bone from last weekend’s clash between a pro-police rally and Black Lives Matter protesters in Bay Ridge. Bolden’s lawyer is calling for criminal charges against the NYPD officers who caused the damage to him. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

This is the last story I’m going to link to about the people who ran Ample Hills into the ground for a while. It’s an interview with the owners, which took place before the sale of the business after declaring bankruptcy, which was unrelated to the Covid-19 pandemic. It’s enough with these two, who are already talking about starting another ice cream-related business. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Video: 9-year-old chess champion Tanitoluwa Adewumi isn’t letting the pandemic get in his way of trying to become a chess grand master. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Mayor de Blasio signed the chokehold ban and police accountability bills into city law on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD forced a homeless man off the subway, cuffed him, beat him, and sent him to the hospital. Cy Vance chose to charge him with assault. One day later and after watching the video of the homeless man getting pepper-sprayed, punched, and pummeled by NYPD officers, District Attorney Vance decided to drop the assault charges but is continuing to pursue charges of resisting arrest. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

AOC is the latest person to pressure Governor Cuomo to back a tax on New York’s billionaires. (Jeffrey C. Mays and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Feature: Brooklynite Siobhan O’Loughlin’s art requires an interactive audience in an intimate setting. Her show Broken Bone Bathtub literally asks audience members to wash her while she sits in a tub. Under a shelter-in-place order, O’Loughlin pivoted to the heavy task of creating intimate environments with audiences regardless of distance. Her latest show, “My Heart Will Go Zoom,” tells the honest, engaging story of quarantine romance. (Hoa P Nguyen for Brooklyn Based)

9 rooftops your can visit today. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 29, 2019 – The “Fried Chicken Sandwich Ridiculousness Ends This Week” Edition

The police union calls for de Blasio and O’Neill’s removal, 15 trendy restaurants you can get into, security measures for the West Indian Day Parade, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A ban on foie gras is working its way through the city council and could come up for a vote in the fall. More than half of the council has so-sponsored the bill and it has support from the mayor, but there are questions about the ability to enforce the bill. (NY Times)

Despite the ever-changing nature of the city, Gem Spa is swimming upstream on the corner of St. Marks and 2nd Ave in a struggle to survive. (NY Times)

New construction can’t stop the rats. (Bowery Boogie)

This week ends the Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich frenzy that took over August, as all locations will be completely sold out of the sandwich. (Grub Street)

Google Pigeon is turning to crowdsourcing to solve real-time public transit information, kinda like Waze for the buses and trains. It might be hard to log a delay between stations without a connection to the internet. (Streetsblog)

Photos: Inside Borough Park’s Torah Animal World, which is full of taxidermied animals mentioned in the Torah. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be distracted, the classics are still the only real way to enjoy a meal at Katz’s Deli. (Eater)

The Department of Buildings blames construction materials stored on the roof for the building collapse on Tuesday in the Bronx, calling it a “preventable tragedy.” (Gothamist)

Here’s what eliminating the city’s schools’ gifted programs would look like and what would take their place. (Chalk Beat)

The 21 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall. (Time Out)

The United States could lose its measles elimination status by October if more cases of the disease are discovered in NYC or NY state. (Huff Post)

Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate activist, arrived via a solar-powered boat on Wednesday after a 15-day trip across the Atlantic to attend the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (NY Times)

It’s rare, but every now and then you come across a subway busker actually worth listening to, like these two guys nailing Prince’s “Kiss.” (Gothamist)

How “public” is New York City’s public transportation? If it doesn’t serve all, who is it meant to serve? (The Indypendent)

No one wants to hear it (except the Halloween-obsessed spooks), but summer is coming to an end. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

How to spend a day eating, drinking, and enjoying Snug Harbor in Staten Island. (NY Times)

The police union passed a vote of no confidence Wednesday in Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill, calling for O’Neill to resign and for Governor Cuomo to remove Mayor de Blasio from office. This is in protest over the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold on Eric Garner lead to his death. (Politico)

The history of the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (6sqft)

The NYPD announced safety measures for the West Indian Day Parade, summarizing their approach with “There will literally be a cop everywhere.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What happened to the city’s safe injection sites? The mayor announced them in May of 2018, but none have opened. Activists that gathered outside Cuomo’s Manhattan offices are blaming the governor for intentionally delaying the state’s mandated review of the program. (Gothamist)

Did you talk shit about Amazon after they announced their Long Island City HQ2 plans? If you did, you’re probably in a secret “NY Negative Statements” dossier the company kept. (Gothamist)

The Notorious B.I.G., but in Funko Pop form. (Brooklyn Vegan)

What the Dodgers meant to Brooklyn. (Brooklyn this Week)

The New York Fire Department forced a Muslim firefighter to shave his beard in violation of his religious beliefs, according to a new lawsuit. (Patch)

15 trendy restaurants you can get into. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 28, 2019 – The “Signs of a Wegmans Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

The growth in the car population is outpacing the growth of the actual population, the best floor in a walk-up, taking a wallaby for a walk, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All the street closings and timing of the West Indian Day Parade and all the associated events over Labor Day weekend. (Curbed)

An Andy Warhol tour and map of Manhattan from artist Patricia Fernández. (Untapped Cities)

Five takeaways from the plan to scrap the city’s gifted school programs. Will Mayor de Blasio follow the recommendation from the task force he assembled or will he try to run out the clock as he did with Eric Garner’s death? (NY Times)

It’s getting real. Signs are going up at the home of the future Brooklyn Wegmans. (Brownstoner)

Does it seem odd to anyone else that the mayor is supporting restrictions to hotel development after receiving support and campaign contributions from the hotel industry union? (6sqft)

The Mast Brothers are out of Brooklyn, doing the hipster move from Williamsburg to upstate. (Eater)

Every neighborhood has its old-school spots that have been there for decades, and many of them are endangered. Two Toms in Gowanus has been family owned since 1948, but the building the restaurant is in is for sale and the listing says it could be delivered vacant “if necessary.” (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The growth of the number of cars in the city is outpacing the growth of the city’s population. (Streetsblog)

The city is full of hidden history. Sometimes that history is a poster from 2000 for the movie Road Trip. (Gothamist)

In praise of the Manhattan dive bar: Cheap beer and good atmosphere are increasingly hard to find, but it’s out there. (amNY)

A worker was killed and five injured in a partial building collapse in Norwood in the Bronx. (Metro)

A wall in Chinatown with messages of support for the protests in Hong Kong has been vandalized twice in less than a week. Global politics are also local politics. (Gothamist)

What’s the best floor to live on in a six-floor walk-up? (Street Easy)

Jeffrey Epstein’s victims will never have their full day in court, but they have vowed to not stop fighting. (Gothamist)

The family of Eric Garner filed a judicial inquiry of Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill to answer questions about their handling of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the NYPD. (Politico)

Leslie Jones is not returning to SNL. (Gothamist)

Video: Nothing to see here here, just a man walking taking his pet wallaby for a walk. Nope, this was in Bed-Stuy, not Bushwick. (Patch)

The total population in the city’s jails has fallen 23% from 2014, but the population jailed for parole violations increased by 20% in the same period, with the average stay lasting 60 days while they wait for parole court dates. (Gothamist)

Seven acres under the new Kosciuszko Bridge in Greenpoint will be made into a park. There’s no proposed opening date and construction has not begun. The project will be lead by the North Brooklyn Parks Alliance. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Conservative Times Op-Ed columnist and climate change denier Bret Stephens quit Twitter because someone called him a “bedbug.” Poor Bret. (Gothamist)

Video: It’ll take more than It’s Pennywise the clown to rattle New Yorkers riding the L late at night. (Patch)

28 of the best sports bars in the city. (Eater)