The Briefly for April 12, 2019 – The “Racist If You Do, Racist If You Don’t” Edition

A hall of fame bad statement about a hit and run, Wegmans is opening this year, a gold steak, the bookmobile returns, the future of street meat, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s something you didn’t want to hear: Getting around on the subways this weekend will be more challenging than usual. (Subway Changes)

Why are there religious exemptions for vaccines? (NY Times)

A dragonstone throne will be inside the West Village Shake Shack in anticipation of Sunday’s Game of Thrones premiere. So unless you’re looking to sit on the throne, you may want to avoid that spot today. (amNY)

The city’s use of SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools was called racist. The city’s attempts to eliminate the SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools is called racist. (Politico)

A 4/20 guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The NYPL bookmobile is making a comeback this summer, with a first test in the Bronx, while the Grand Concourse Library undergoes a renovation. (amNY)

Every city borough (except Staten Island) has a higher audit rate than the rest of the state. What gives? (Patch)

17 of the 21 buildings the city is buying for $173 million are “immediately hazardous,” which includes mice and roach infestations, lead paint issues, water leaks, and broken locks. There are over 400 open violations in the buildings and the landlords are under federal investigation for tax fraud and the lawyer representing them in the sale is a de Blasio fundraiser. Weird. (The Real Deal)

Wegmans will open this fall in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. If you lived or went to college upstate, your palms are probably sweating right now. (Eater)

Ivan Nieves was found guilty of vandalizing the African Burial Ground National Monument, which happened on November 1. (NY Post)

Does the Playboy Club have a place in modern New York City? (NY Times)

The most affordable restaurants in New York, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

There have been some phenomenal F-bombs on local TV over the years, from Sue Simmons’ random outburst to Ernie Asnastos’ chicken “loving” incident. Kudos to Chris Cimino, an NBC weatherman who dropped an F-bomb on live TV at 8:15am. (NY Post)

Broadway is getting a Tina Turner musical this fall. (Time Out)

The city will no longer buy single-use plastic cups, forks, knives, spoons or plates for its agencies and the mayor has indicated he supports a ban on single-use plastic in restaurants too (read: straws), with exemptions for people with disabilities. (amNY)

As New York heads towards decriminalizing marijuana use, how it’s treated by the Administration for Children’s Services needs to change. (Gothamist)

If you’re aware of the L Project, MTA Chairperson Pay Foye says that is proof enough of the MTA’s transparency about the project. Right. (Gothamist)

P.S. 9 Teunis G. Bergen will be renamed the Sarah Smith Garnet School to remove the history associated with the Bergen family as slave-holders. Garnet was the first African-American woman to become a principal in the city. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How did the city let the Y2K GPS crash happen? Don’t ask the mayor, because he already has his excuse. “I was not involved in the planning. It was not something that came up to my level.” (NY Post)

Meet the members of Community Board 6, who will decide the fate of the Gowanus neighborhood with a rezoning vote. (Pardon Me For Asking)

How to ID the fake monks that hang around tourist hot spots. (Viewing NYC)

A permit to sell street meat costs only $300 form the city but goes for $25,000 on the black market, which is why the Councilmember Margaret Chin wants to phase in an additional 4,000 permits over 10 years. Opponents are calling for more regulation before more permits are given out. (Patch)

A literal golden steak? Yup. It’s available on Staten Island. (SI Live)

“I left because, come on, I hit a little girl, I’m going to jail.“ Just when you think we’ve hit a hall of fame bad statement about someone’s alleged part in a hit and run, Julia Litmonovich also said: “What is the big deal, it was an accident.” (NY Post)

“Why can’t white people open Chinese food restaurants?” asks your uncle, who normally reserves this kind of stuff for his Facebook page. This is why. (NY Times)

Where to go when you’re not sure its a date. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 8, 2019 – The “One More Thing in the List of What Can Kill Us in the City” Edition

Subway graffiti cleaning costs are up over 300%, a new antibiotic-resistant superbug, the late night subway changes and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If it’s headed towards midnight and you need to get somewhere, better check the late night subway changes before you do. (Subway Changes)

Why is Mayor de Blasio talking about running for president? No really, why is he doing this? (NY Times)

The CDC added another antibiotic-resistant superbug to their list of urgent threats after three run-ins with the Candida Auris fungus in city hospitals. Add it to the list of things in the city that will one day kill us all. (NY Post)

The fight over the city’s ferry system continues. Scott Stringer has blocked the purchase of any new ferries and a new report from the Citizens Budget Commission shows how we’re spending $11-24 to subsidize every Ferry NYC ride. Maybe we could, you know, spend that money to fix the subways and buses? (Second Ave Sagas)

Where to eat in Hudson Yards, if you’re going to actually eat there. (The Infatuation)

The city has been testing facial recognition technology for drivers on the Triborough Bridge and not only did it fail, it failed to a magnificent degree. (Engadget)

Have you ever heard of the New York & Atlantic Railway? (NY Times)

The isn’t unlike the rest of the country, but sometimes without the same amounts of space. Things like an old school bowling alley, or paintball, or amusement park happens more towards the city’s fringes, but they’re all still here. The Bay Ridge Model Railroad Club, however, has its days numbered as the landlord of their space has told them to vacate their space. A GoFundMe wasn’t enough to save the club established in 1946, but a Trolley Museum in Kingston has volunteered to make a home for their model railroad. (amNY)

There’s more than one way to skin a cat. The state’s legislature is considering a bill that would allow the state’s Department of Taxation and Finance to release any New Yorker’s tax returns (like, you know, the president) to the House of Representatives for a “specific and legitimate legislative purpose.” (NY Times)

“There is absolutely no promposals to be conducted anywhere in the school or even around the school and that includes anywhere on your way to school or on your way home from school.” Yes, that sais PROMposals and no this isn’t the Onion, it’s a school in Queens. (NY Post)

Michael Laidlaw, the former head of Human Resources for NYC Social Services, was allowed to resign after groping and sexually harassing his assistant. (Bronx Justice News)

So the city couldn’t verify 86% of the “random” inspections of the rides in Coney Island, looking at 1,857 spot checks by the Department of Buildings’ Elevator Unit. An audit also found that over 13% of the years’ records for the last three years were completely missing. The city is blaming poor record keeping and not shoddy inspections on the discrepancy and that all the rides have been inspected before this weekend’s opening. (amNY)

Do renters get any tax breaks? (Streeteasy)

Will the state continue to poke holes in congestion pricing with exceptions? (Curbed)

The MTA’s graffiti cleaning costs were up 364% in 2018 compared to 2017, delays were up too. (The City)

Where to get a last-minute dinner in the West Village. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 12, 2019 – The “Half a Chrysler Building of Cocaine” Edition

The MTA claims the subways are moving faster, the rise of vegan diners, James Dolan will ensure no one ever sees the Knicks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The previous owners of the Chrysler Building lost $650 million in the $150 million sale of the building. Not a bad deal for 1.2 million square feet. (HuffPost)

Rent in Rego Park and Jackson Heights are leading the way in Queens rent increases according to a February 2019 Rental Market Report. (QNS)

If Knicks owner and awful songwriter James Dolan banned everyone who heckled him to sell the team, there would be no one left in MSG. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel at JFK will also include artifact and memorabilia exhibitions. A curator for the New York Historical Society is working on the project. (6sqft)

Jake’s Dilemma, an Upper West Side bar, is being review bombed on Yelp for refusing service to someone in a MAGA hat. The MAGA adorned Dion Cini was banned from Disneyland and Disney World after continually unfurling Trump 2020 banners on rides, so you know he’s a real winner. (Eater)

Jake’s Dilemma suspended the hero bartender, despite owner Mitch Banchik admitting the MAGA man was being obnoxious and was given warnings before being asked to leave. (BrooklynVegan)

Federal agencies seized $77 million of cocaine at a port near the city in the largest bust in 25 years. One more bust of that size and they could have bought the Chrysler Building! (Gothamist)

The diner may be on the decline, but there are new standouts looking to evolve the diner concept with vegan alternatives. (Grubstreet)

Meet the women who founded New York City’s modern and contemporary art museums. (6sqft)

The city’s Department of Education is visiting homeless shelters to help families apply for free pre-kindergarten for all 4-year-olds. Families have until March 15 to apply. (Gothamist)

Does a Spider-Man superfan know more about NYC than a local? Let’s skip the entire “What qualifies someone to be a local?” conversation. That’s never helpful. (Gizmodo)

Meet Fauzia Abdur-Rahman, the jerk chicken queen of the Bronx. (Munchies)

Why do New Yorkers walk so fast? The proper answer is that we don’t. You walk too slow. (Gothamist)

The GVSHP submitted a request to landmark the interior of the West Village’s historic White Horse Tavern after the building was purchased by a questionable consortium of developers. (Curbed)

The woman who sprayed multiple people with pepper spray on Friday reportedly claimed she hated white people before spraying them. Tasha Herd was charged with multiple hate-crime felonies and misdemeanors in connection to the attacks. (NY Times)

The city’s school are going meatless on Mondays for the 2019-2020 school year. It’s healthier for students and better for the environment. (amNY)

Aly and Charlie Weisman went out in search of the city’s best bagel and lox. (Food Insider)

The Brooklyn Diocese is demanding an apology from Pete Davidson after comparing the Catholic Church to R. Kelly. Those in glass cathedrals shouldn’t throw stones. (Gothamist)

The MTA says trains are moving faster at 50 stations across the city. Have you noticed the difference? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The smallest pedestrian bridge in Central Park. (Ephemeral New York)

The joys of getting lost. (Atlas Obscura)

The global Time Out Index has revealed that NYC is the best city in the world. Duh. (Time Out)

There have been 182 cases of measles in the city, almost exclusively within the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. (NY Times)

Where to get brunch if you hate brunch. (The Infatuation)

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