The Briefly for March 24, 2020 – The “Quarantine Rainbow Scavenger Hunt” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The first day of remote learning for NYC, C trains temporarily shut down after an MTA worker tests positive for COVID-19, Economy Candy adapts, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

How to access unemployment and other government benefits right now. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You won’t find a social media presence for Corona Courier, a community pairing bike couriers with people who need to self-quarantine. They deliver based on where their volunteers are located. If you’ve got some time on your hands and a desire to help, this is an opportunity for you. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

The mayor is starting to talk about schools being closed for the rest of the year, despite being hopeful about letting students back in on April 20. (East New York News)

Here’s what NYC’s first day of remote learning looked like. (Alex Zimmerman, Christina Veiga, and Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The city’s playgrounds are open. Are they safe? “It would take a Herculean effort every five minutes, literally, that we simply can’t do.” -Mayor de Blasio. (Curtis Brodner for BKLYNER)

If you’ve been seeing rainbows in the windows of apartments around Brooklyn, welcome to the quarantine rainbow scavenger hunt. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Commuting in Corona Times” by Kera Hill is the new subway map that you have to see. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Three depressing charts that spell out the demise of the subways. (Streetsblog)

The work has begun to go through the articles that survived the fire at the MoCA archives on Mulberry St. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Brooklyn has the highest count of positive COVID-19, but so far it hasn’t been included in the state’s plans for a temporary hospital to deal with the sick and Borough President Eric Adams isn’t happy about that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

How do you enjoy life?” was the note left behind by Robert Herman, photographer, and Tribeca resident, before jumping to his death from his 16th-floor window. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Video: Drone footage of American cities, nearly deserted. (Matt Novak for Gizmodo)

The idea behind closing off some streets to automobile traffic is to alleviate the density in the city’s parks. Think about it like an ongoing block party where everyone has to remain six feet away from each other. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Here’s a list of the streets that TransAlt and Bike New York are calling for closure. The most surprising on the list is the Jackie Robinson Parkway, which also includes the NYC marathon route, NYC street fair routes, summer streets and car-free day streets, and more. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Turns out restaurants that were popular before coronavirus closed all the city’s restaurants are still popular now that we’re in “take-out only” mode. (Gary He for Eater)

Rao’s, NYC’s most exclusive restaurant, is offering take-out for the first time ever. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Does Scott Stringer realize he’s made a The Lox featuring Lil’ Kim and DMX reference when talking about why the census is important? (@NYCComptroller)

The city could be looking at a $6 billion hit during the projected six-month COVID-19 crisis according to City Comptroller Scott Stringer. As far as I can tell, that doesn’t include the $4 billion the MTA is asking for or the $1.9 billion the Port Authority is asking for. (Robert Pozarycki for QNS)

Photos: An empty NYC just before the PAUSE. (Jen Carlson with photos by Gretchen Robinette, Scott Lynch, and David “Dee” Delgado for Gothamist)

The MTA has announced that it has suspended fare collection on all of its local and select bus routes in order to keep its drivers safe from coronavirus. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

I used to work with someone whose weekly routine included taking a lunch break and going to Economy Candy to stock up for her desk and apartment. If you're someone for whom candy is a part of life, Economy Candy is now offering CandyCare Packs to keep you sugared up. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Now is the absolute worst time to open a restaurant, right? Say hello to the brand new Sofia’s Panificio e Vino in Little Italy. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Mike Bloomberg claimed that he’d be paying his campaign staff through November regardless if he dropped out of the race. He dropped out of the race and 2,000 of his former campaign staffers are suing him for fraud in a class-action lawsuit. (Christopher Cadelago for Politico)

Rough Trade NYC closed its online store without an explicitly stated reason. Relatedly, Amazon announced that it was pausing restocking vinyl and CDs, so this could be a supply chain issue. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

RIP Nashom Wooden, aka drag legend Mona Foot, a victim of COVID-19. (Mickey Boardman for Paper)

WABC 770 radio relaunched under a new owner. They had a party on March 16 for the relaunch on March 16, the same day the state limited gatherings to 50 and closed bars, restaurants, and gyms. Look at the photos of these idiots at a party in the radio studio. (amNewYork Metro, with no writer credited)

Community Gardens in the city are closed to the public “effective immediately” and “until further notice.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The EPA is evaluating if the Coney Island Creek is eligible to become a Superfund site. The waterway has been polluted for decades after the historical manufacturing of dye and gas in the area. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Gladson Ltd normally supplies Gucci, Paul Smith, Stella McCartney, and others with luxury fabrics, but they’ll be churning out a million facemasks for local hospitals. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk by the Long Island City Waterfront at Hunters Point South Park and Gantry Plaza State Park at night. (ActionKid)

City Harvest is looking for volunteers to pack food for fellow New Yorkers. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

On Monday morning the MTA stopped running C trains after an employee tested positive for COVID-19. 30 workers have tested positive for coronavirus. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The end of the month is coming. Are we going to see a rent freeze? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The list of the best things the editors of Eater ate and drank this week looks vastly different while sheltering-in-place. (Eater)

“I always knew that when the end came, New Yorkers would watch it from a bar. But this was not the end any of us had imagined. Crowding together, not just a survival skill but an engine of the city in normal times, was the most dangerous thing of all.” -Pete Wells for NY Times

The Briefly for January 16, 2020 – The “Most Important Story Today: Our Mayor’s Dumb Bagel Order” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news update: A look at the propsoed Rock Center renovation, a guide to donating in NYC, the impeachment features a Queens vs Brooklyn fight, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 49˚
Light rain in the morning.

The story of how Anne Carroll Moore successfully banned Goodnight Moon from New York’s Public Libraries for 25 years. (Dan Kois for Slate)

National Grid is digging a natural gas pipeline that runs through Bushwick and Williamsburg and connects to Maspeth. People are predictably angry. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

New Jersey tried to claim it has the best bagels. Stick to Bon Jovi and Springsteen, jerkwads. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

I don’t go out of my way to call Mayor de Blasio an idiot, even if 100% of respondents from The Briefly said they don’t think he’s doing a good job, but I can’t resist here. Our idiot mayor took to Twitter to declare the best bagel in New York is a toasted wheat bagel with cream cheese. Excuse me? Toasted wheat? What else would you expect from someone who eats pizza with a fork and loves the Red Sox? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here’s the best part of the “idiot mayor orders bagel for idiots” story. The very specific bagel he is referring to, toasted wheat with cream cheese from the Bagel Hole in Park Slope is not possible to get at the Bagel Hole. The Bagel Hole does not toast bagels or even own a bagel toaster. The mayor deleted the offending tweet. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

While were on the subject of politicians with bad bagel orders, let’s not forget Cynthia Nixon’s abomination of a bagel order. (Whitney Filloon for Eater)

The Parks Department needs to remove and move nearly 15,000 tons of lead-contaminated soil from the Red Hook ballfields. Where will it go? Concrete is being recycled in the city and the rest is being hauled off in trucks to a landfill in Falls Township, PA. (Helene Stapinkski for NY Times)

Governor Cuomo was in Puerto Rico this week to survey the damage done by the series of earthquakes that have plagued the island. This is a task that would any normal president would be doing, but we do not live in normal times. (Anna Gronewald for Politico)

The A/C/E lines have been approved for a signal upgrade, which should start later this year with the signals replaced from Columbus Circle to High St by 2025. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Onion: Top 10 things to do in New York City. (The Onion)

The Parks Department had plans to renovate Fort Greene Park, but the New York Supreme Court has decided that the 30-acre landscape would not be subject to a redesign or the removal of 83 mature trees until a proper environmental impact review is conducted. (Sydney Franklin for The Architect’s Newspaper)

New Brooklyn bars and restaurants to check out this winter. (Jennifer Indig for Brooklyn Based)

Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents continued to arrest people in and around New York courthouses in 2019, flouting a state directive to curtail such operations, according to a new report from the Immigrant Defense Project. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Buzz-a-Rama is the city’s last slot car raceway. Run by Frank “Buzz” Perri, Buzz-A-Rama is open on the weekends in Kensington from September through June. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The IDNYC program is now making cards available in braille and have added new perks for cardholders, including more free one-year memberships to cultural institutions and free admission to the Queens Botanical Garden on Wednesdays. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats smokers, New York is the most expensive state for smokers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Watch Christmas trees go from curb to mulch. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The state’s Board of Elections are considering buying a new system of voting machines that are less secure than our current systems, expensive, and can’t handle a ranked choice voting election, which we will see in the city in 2021. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

A guide to drinking and buying natural wine. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

Here are the eight candidates for Queens borough president that will be on the ballot on March 24: Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer, Costa Constantinides, Donovan Richards; former Council Member Elizabeth Crowley; former Assistant District Attorney Jim Quinn, police reform advocate Anthony Miranda, William Kregler, Danniel Maio, and Dao Yin. (Allie Griffin got Jackson Heights Post)

The city effectively deregulated a so-called “play street” located outside of a Park Slope middle school earlier this month, eliminating recreational space for students in favor of placard parking for teachers and faculty. In an even more incompetent move, the city claims the special designation of “play street” was revoked in 2014, but no one removed the sign until a few weeks ago. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

What should you do if you one across a seal? It may seem like a weird question in New York City, but this week there have already been three seal sightings reported across the city. First and foremost, don’t approach it. Are you some kind of marine mammal expert? You’re probably not. Call the New York Marine Rescue Center’s 24-hour hotline (631-369-9829). (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Spring cleaning is coming soon. A guide to donating your clothes, furniture, books, and electronics. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Renderings: See the proposed renovations to Rockefeller Center. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Christmas Tree in Rockefeller Center has been replaced by a giant peacock. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Renders: The Hudson Yards shared renderings of the next phase of development in an attempt to dispel rumors of plans to build a wall to separate the Western Yards from the rest of us plebes. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Representatives Jerrold Nadler and Hakeem Jeffries from Brooklyn will serve as the house managers for the impeachment hearings in the Senate, setting up a Queens vs Brooklyn battle on a federal level. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Video: A walk from Wall Street to Downtown Brooklyn. (ActionKid)

A panel appointed by Mayor de Blasio and others intends to propose a public-private partnership to bailout thousands of taxi drivers trapped in exploitative loans that could cost as much as $500 million. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

A look inside Brownie’s Hobby Shop, one of the city’s last true hobby shops. (Amanda Fairinacci for NY1)

Chief Martine Materasso is the first woman to lead the NYPD’s Bureau of Counterterrorism. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

Some answers, not satisfying ones but they’re still answers, about what the hell is going on with Grand Central’s lack of accessibility. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

20 stellar jewish delis. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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