The Briefly for April 23, 2020 – The “No One Cares Why You’re Leaving New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The City Council pushes forward with its open streets plan, an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights,” standout sushi takeout and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Light rain overnight.

Despite the Governor’s orders, some hospitals are not allowing one support person in labor and delivery settings. (Virginia Breen for The City)

7 things you didn’t know about Central Park. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look at the positive contributions of David Penepent, a mortuary sciences professor at SUNY Canton, who is helping with the transportation, care, and cremation of New York City’s dead during this pandemic. Very often you’ll hear about how bad of a job someone is doing in a moment of crisis, this is the exact opposite. (Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

15% of pregnant women in NYC tested positive for COVID-19 in a limited study in Manhattan over a two week period. The findings may give a better look into what’s happening with the general population and highlights a need for universal testing. (Bobby Cuza for NY1)

No cares about your “why I’m leaving New York” essay. That goes double during a pandemic. Just leave and take your guilt about leaving with you. (Claire Fallon for HuffPost)

A “plaque” was put up in Park Slope near Methodist Hospital by an unknown guerilla street artist honoring “grocery workers, nurses, hospital staff, doctors, mail carriers, immigrant laborers, and other true heroes” of the pandemic. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The City Council is looking for ways to resuscitate the city’s summer jobs program. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson pushed a 75-mile open street plan forward on Wednesday. Johnson and Council Member Carlina Rivera dismissed the mayor’s concerns about the plan as irrelevant. The mayor has recently blamed the failure of his open streets plan on New Yorkers. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The City Council introduced an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights” on Wednesday, which would require large employers to provide additional protections and hazard pay to those hourly workers helping the city continue to operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Christopher Robbins and Sydney Perreira for Gothamist)

Looking to make your Friday night Zoom hangout feel a little more regular? Check out Virtual Cheers, which in return for a donation to the staff of the bar will give you a photo of the bar of your choice. (Beth Landman for Eater)

The organizers of the city’s Pride parades have decided to collaborate to take their events virtual. Global PRide is June 27, but the city has already canceled all public events in June. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

What’s the first thing you’re gonna eat when quarantine is over? 21 famous New Yorkers on the first thing they’re gonna eat. (Alyssa Shelasky for Grub Street)

The mayor has continued to talk publicly about what it will take to reopen the city, including a “Trace and Test” program, which will move people who test positive into isolation, possibly in one of the 11,000 hotel rooms the city has set aside. Right now the city is aiming for 400,000 test kits per month, which isn’t nearly enough for the city’s 8.5 million people. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mayor Bloomberg volunteered to develop a contact tracing program for the tri-state area. Bloomberg Philanthropies has also made a financial contribution of $10.5 million through the Bloomberg School fo Health at John’s Hopkins. This is separate from the Mayor de Blasio’s plan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is looking to double the number of COVID-19 tests in the state, from 20,000 to 40,000. The 40,000 is “ambitious,” in his own words, with the state’s 300 labs working 24/7 to meet the demand for 20,000. At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Foot Locker, H&M, Old Navy, Nordstrom, Party City, and The Gap, welcome to the non-rent paying party. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The underground, hydroponic farm on Worth St, Farm.One, is still operating, but its produce was originally intended for bars and restaurants. Now they are opening up orders to the public. (Tribeca Citizen)

This is a celebration that has to happen.” -Mayor de Blasio on the Fourth of July fireworks. Fourth of July is six days after NYC Pride was scheduled to end. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Bodega-inspired streetwear. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The MTA’s 250 construction projects are moving forward, albeit with some new safety precautions, being deemed essential. With so few people riding the trains, this may be the optimal time to get that work done.(Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Everyone’s made a mistake when ordering groceries, especially now, but what do you do with ten bunches of bananas or 1,200 coffee filters? (Madison Malone Kircher for Grub Street)

Where to get Mexican takeout and delivery in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

50 things the RESY staff misses most about New York. (RESY)

An interactive map of where to avoid where sidewalks make social distancing impossible. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Now remains a great time to adopt a dog or a cat. The Briefly home has two amazing toy poodles, Scooter and Pepper, and we couldn’t be happier. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

It’s like “ballet or break dancing on a bike.” Meet BMX champ Matthias Dandois, who is doing tricks inside his Tribeca apartment. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

Here is the recipe for Junior’s famous cheesecake from scratch. Now I know what I’m doing to try (and fail) this weekend. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Two NY housecats have tested positive for COVID-19, as well as four tigers and three lions in the Bronx Zoo. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Meet Jennifer Marino-Bonventre, an English teacher who is bringing some joy to the city with some fantastic sidewalk chalk drawings. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

The Times found out what the rest of us already knew: New Yorkers want cheap wine and a lot of cheap wine. (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

New York City, a city of winners, and Boston, which is a different city, have different sports teams, different coffee choices, different clam chowders, and two genetically different types of pigeons. (Joshua Sokol for NY Times)

22 standout sushi spots still open for takeout and delivery. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

Thanks to reader Melissa for today’s featured photo from the East Village.

The Briefly for April 17, 2020 – The “Every Hour is Happy Hour When Time is Meaningless” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city’s budget goes wartime, the best brunch options for delivery, high end stores are boarding up their windows, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 51˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 41˚ High: 63˚

4K VIdeo: Walking through Times Square. (ActionKid)

In honor of his late grandmother, Michael Che will be paying May’s rent for the 160 apartments in the NYCHA building where she lived. (Ron Dicker for HuffPost)

Rent in the city dropped 6% since the start since March 22. (Localize.City)

Tenant groups are set for a rent strike on May 1. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Sick of sourdough? Here are seven bread options for you to try. (Sam O’Brien for Atlas Obscura)

The allure and anxiety of drinking along in quarantine. (Alice Feriring for Grub Street)

What time is it okay to start drinking alcohol? It’s hard to tell because time has no meaning anymore. (Shayla Love for VICE)

Slowly, the city’s government is finding a way to move forward. The City Council and the Landmarks Preservation Commission will start meeting digitally next week. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Taxi drivers were struggling before the pandemic. With COVID-19, they face even more difficulties. (Estefania Hernandez for NY1)

Are you willing to go to a live sport without a vaccine? 61% of sports fans and 71% of people overall are unwilling to go until there’s a vaccine. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Keith McNally’s Lucky Strike on Grand Street is closed for good. Is it the first domino to fall when it comes to independent restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

From former Roberta’s and Speedy Romeo chef Robert Guimond comes Public Display of Affection, a wood-fired pizza spot in Park Slope on Union Street. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio released a revised “wartime” budget on Thursday, with a $6 billion reduction. “A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor when speaking about his budget. Last year he said, “Placard abuse erodes faith in government and has no place in our city.” This year he’s eliminating the Placard Abuse Enforcement Team. Activist Charles Komanoff has a different idea: Disband the Collision Investigation Squad instead. (Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog)

Workers at two luxury Manhattan residential buildings, The Chamberlain and 432 West 52nd Street, walked out on the job, claiming poor work conditions and harassment. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

It’s easy to think that artists should use this time to create something new, but the reality of the moment can be much heavier than imaginable. This is Rori Nogee’s story of going from having six jobs and a show ready to open on Restaurant Row to a 100% loss of income and opportunities. (Rori Nogee for New York Cliche)

A look at what might be New York City’s last open bookstore. (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

I first saw it from a friend’s story on Instagram, the boarded-up stores in Manhattan. It’s a pandemic, not The Purge. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Pizza bagels? Pizza rolls? Please. Forget it, now pizza cupcakes are ready for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Tired of the same old views? Check out the livestreams of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“It should be stated bluntly that traveling on the New York subway system is now one of the more frightful experiences Western civilization has to offer on a regular basis. The experience is not only intolerable. It is also a daily advertisement for the brutish sensibilities and shallow brainpans of the people who now control the city.” “Why We Hate the Subways,” despite being timely, was written in 1977. (Alexander Cockburn for Village Voice)

Thank goodness for people like the non-profit Greenpoint Cats, who have been doing their best to look after bodega cats left behind or abandoned as bodegas close. (Aaron Simon for Greenpointers)

10 great sandwiches still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found floating in the East River near Roosevelt Island. (Emily Davenpont for QNS)

New York remains on PAUSE until at least May 15. (Kathleen Culliton for PAtch)

Reports of domestic violence have dropped dramatically across the city, and that’s not a good thing. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

Watch New Yorkers sing “New York, New York” out their windows after Thursday’s 7 pm clap, a project of the Peace of Heart Choir. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In what started as a cheap way to live, an $800-a-month illegal bedroom in Bushwick with no windows now sounds more like a cruel experiment. (Trey Taylor for Curbed)

Do you miss Shake Shack? Here’s the recipe for the ShackBurger and ShackSauce. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The best brunch options in NYC available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for March 24, 2020 – The “Quarantine Rainbow Scavenger Hunt” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The first day of remote learning for NYC, C trains temporarily shut down after an MTA worker tests positive for COVID-19, Economy Candy adapts, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

How to access unemployment and other government benefits right now. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You won’t find a social media presence for Corona Courier, a community pairing bike couriers with people who need to self-quarantine. They deliver based on where their volunteers are located. If you’ve got some time on your hands and a desire to help, this is an opportunity for you. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

The mayor is starting to talk about schools being closed for the rest of the year, despite being hopeful about letting students back in on April 20. (East New York News)

Here’s what NYC’s first day of remote learning looked like. (Alex Zimmerman, Christina Veiga, and Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The city’s playgrounds are open. Are they safe? “It would take a Herculean effort every five minutes, literally, that we simply can’t do.” -Mayor de Blasio. (Curtis Brodner for BKLYNER)

If you’ve been seeing rainbows in the windows of apartments around Brooklyn, welcome to the quarantine rainbow scavenger hunt. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Commuting in Corona Times” by Kera Hill is the new subway map that you have to see. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Three depressing charts that spell out the demise of the subways. (Streetsblog)

The work has begun to go through the articles that survived the fire at the MoCA archives on Mulberry St. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Brooklyn has the highest count of positive COVID-19, but so far it hasn’t been included in the state’s plans for a temporary hospital to deal with the sick and Borough President Eric Adams isn’t happy about that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

How do you enjoy life?” was the note left behind by Robert Herman, photographer, and Tribeca resident, before jumping to his death from his 16th-floor window. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Video: Drone footage of American cities, nearly deserted. (Matt Novak for Gizmodo)

The idea behind closing off some streets to automobile traffic is to alleviate the density in the city’s parks. Think about it like an ongoing block party where everyone has to remain six feet away from each other. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Here’s a list of the streets that TransAlt and Bike New York are calling for closure. The most surprising on the list is the Jackie Robinson Parkway, which also includes the NYC marathon route, NYC street fair routes, summer streets and car-free day streets, and more. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Turns out restaurants that were popular before coronavirus closed all the city’s restaurants are still popular now that we’re in “take-out only” mode. (Gary He for Eater)

Rao’s, NYC’s most exclusive restaurant, is offering take-out for the first time ever. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Does Scott Stringer realize he’s made a The Lox featuring Lil’ Kim and DMX reference when talking about why the census is important? (@NYCComptroller)

The city could be looking at a $6 billion hit during the projected six-month COVID-19 crisis according to City Comptroller Scott Stringer. As far as I can tell, that doesn’t include the $4 billion the MTA is asking for or the $1.9 billion the Port Authority is asking for. (Robert Pozarycki for QNS)

Photos: An empty NYC just before the PAUSE. (Jen Carlson with photos by Gretchen Robinette, Scott Lynch, and David “Dee” Delgado for Gothamist)

The MTA has announced that it has suspended fare collection on all of its local and select bus routes in order to keep its drivers safe from coronavirus. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

I used to work with someone whose weekly routine included taking a lunch break and going to Economy Candy to stock up for her desk and apartment. If you're someone for whom candy is a part of life, Economy Candy is now offering CandyCare Packs to keep you sugared up. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Now is the absolute worst time to open a restaurant, right? Say hello to the brand new Sofia’s Panificio e Vino in Little Italy. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Mike Bloomberg claimed that he’d be paying his campaign staff through November regardless if he dropped out of the race. He dropped out of the race and 2,000 of his former campaign staffers are suing him for fraud in a class-action lawsuit. (Christopher Cadelago for Politico)

Rough Trade NYC closed its online store without an explicitly stated reason. Relatedly, Amazon announced that it was pausing restocking vinyl and CDs, so this could be a supply chain issue. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

RIP Nashom Wooden, aka drag legend Mona Foot, a victim of COVID-19. (Mickey Boardman for Paper)

WABC 770 radio relaunched under a new owner. They had a party on March 16 for the relaunch on March 16, the same day the state limited gatherings to 50 and closed bars, restaurants, and gyms. Look at the photos of these idiots at a party in the radio studio. (amNewYork Metro, with no writer credited)

Community Gardens in the city are closed to the public “effective immediately” and “until further notice.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The EPA is evaluating if the Coney Island Creek is eligible to become a Superfund site. The waterway has been polluted for decades after the historical manufacturing of dye and gas in the area. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Gladson Ltd normally supplies Gucci, Paul Smith, Stella McCartney, and others with luxury fabrics, but they’ll be churning out a million facemasks for local hospitals. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk by the Long Island City Waterfront at Hunters Point South Park and Gantry Plaza State Park at night. (ActionKid)

City Harvest is looking for volunteers to pack food for fellow New Yorkers. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

On Monday morning the MTA stopped running C trains after an employee tested positive for COVID-19. 30 workers have tested positive for coronavirus. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The end of the month is coming. Are we going to see a rent freeze? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The list of the best things the editors of Eater ate and drank this week looks vastly different while sheltering-in-place. (Eater)

“I always knew that when the end came, New Yorkers would watch it from a bar. But this was not the end any of us had imagined. Crowding together, not just a survival skill but an engine of the city in normal times, was the most dangerous thing of all.” -Pete Wells for NY Times