The Briefly for April 27, 2020 – The “An Upward Failure of Epic Proportions” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The threat to the city’s restaurants, antibody tests are unreliable, the Governor cancels the Queens presidential special elections, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 49˚
Overcast throughout the day.

All eligible voters will receive a postage-paid absentee ballot application to vote in the June 23 primary. (Alejandra O-Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Grocery stores have adjusted to pandemic life, but seemingly no grocery store has had to make the adjustments the Park Slope Coop has made. Transitioning from an all-volunteer workforce to paid workers and turning the people of Park Slope, whatever you think of them, into patient and understanding shoppers. (Terri Ciccone for Eater)

One of the weekend’s most talked-about pieces is an essay from Gabrielle Hamilton, owner and chef at Prune on 1st between 1st and 2nd Ave for twenty years, about closing her restaurant and wondering if there’s a place in the city for it once the city returns. (Gabrielle Hamilton for The New York Times Magazine)

The governor us looking ahead to when the state can start taking baby steps towards reopening. “Phase one of the reopening will involve construction and manufacturing activities, and within construction and manufacturing, those businesses that have a low risk. Phase two would be more of a business-by-business analysis using the matrix that we’ve discussed: How essential a service does that business provide and how risky is that business.” There will be a two week period between phases where the effectiveness will be measured. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor announced two task forces and a series of advisory councils that will begin the talks about restarting the city’s economy. In one of the most unbelievable examples of failing upwards, Chirlane McCray will be leading one of the task forces. McCray is the head of ThriveNYC, the mental health program which has spent $850 million of the city’s money with very little to show for it. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The current COVID-19 antibody tests are unreliable, according to the City Health Department’s Division of Disease Control, and can not determine if you’re immune to COVID-19. (Caroline Lewis, Sophia Chang, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Independent pharmacies will become COVID-19 test collection sites while the state expands testing to essential workers and expands capacity to 40,000 tests a day. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Over a century ago, the subways had their own baseball league. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Stonewall Democratic Club of New York City endorsed incumbent Yvette Clarke for Congress over anti-LGBTQ Chaim Deutsch during a five-hour virtual endorsement meeting ahead of the June 23 Democratic primary. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Six maps to help you discover the city from home. (Lillia Panych for Untapped New York)

What happens when a roommate defects from NYC because COVID-19 is coming and rent is due? (Kate Mooney for Curbed)

The best, and more importantly worst, frozen grocery foods. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

On March 1, NYC had one confirmed case of the novel coronavirus, research shows it was closer to 10,000. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

The first thing Time Out’s staffers are going to do when life returns to “normal.” Personally, I’m looking forward to going to my band’s rehearsal space and playing my drums again. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The best secret menu items available for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

AOC was the only Democrat to vote against the federal government’s $484 billion relief package. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

AOC’s district is the epicenter of the fight against COVID-19 in a city that is already the epicenter of the fight against COVID-19. In an opinion piece, she lays out three policies that a stimulus must include, like $2,000 monthly payments as a first step. (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for amNewYork Metro)

The special election for Queens borough president is canceled by executive order by Governor Cuomo. The winner was going to serve until the end of the year, which seems pointless at this point. Acting President Sharon Lee will remain president for the rest of the year. (Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

The L train construction is complete and ahead of schedule. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Remember when congestion pricing was going to happen and the money the state made from it was going to fix the subways? lol. (Yessenia Funes for Gizmodo)

The Metropolitan Opera is continuing its free performances every night this week. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

New York Sports Club is reimbursing its members for fees during the pandemic, marking this the one time NYSC has done anything that appears to be remotely friendly to the city, even if it was forced by the state’s attorney general. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

RIP Richard Hake, beloved WNYC anchor. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The lost wedding ring on the Upper West Side lost during the 7pm clap? It’s been found! (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

The worst people in the city this weekend were the joggers without masks. Another good reason to never start running. (EV Grieve)

Jane’s Walk NYC honors Jane Jacobs with a series of free neighborhood walking tours every year, with this year’s offering to be a completely remote event during the first week of May. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The NYPD and the Department of Transportation are against opening streets for pedestrians and cyclists, adding to the complete lack of creativity from this administration when it comes to easing the pain of a multi-month quarantine for this city. According to former city officials and epidemiologists, it is something that is achievable. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A look at the city’s roofs, which have become an oasis for those who have access to them. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Eataly, “the world’s largest artisanal Italian food and beverage marketplace,” received a Payroll Protection Program small business loan. Along with their loan, Eataly provided employees an option to receive a paycheck that covers only a portion of missed wages or continue on unemployment and resign. If they resign, they will be ineligible for unemployment. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Eataly gets its loan, but restaurants like the Lower East Side’s LES Enfants de Bohème have not heard back about their application. With $15,000 in bills, while remaining closed, they could be among the half of the city’s small restaurants that may not make it through the pandemic, according to Krishnendu Ray, chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University. (Rebeca Ibarra for Gothamist)

Five weeks after New York City moved to remote learning, 19,000 students who requested devices still don’t have them. (Alex Zimmerman and Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Need a kitchen staple and don’t want to fight the grocery store lines? Try a restaurant. The Times shines a light on places like Glou + Glick and M’s Original in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, which are both buying items like eggs, sugar, flour, and hand soap wholesale to ease the stress of needing a single item. (Elspeth Velten for NY Times)

Breaking down the Giants’ complete 2020 NFL Draft. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Breaking down the Jets’ complete 2020 NFL Draft. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Since the COVID-19 crisis began, approximately 35 percent of the city’s roughly one thousand food pantries, soup kitchens, and mobile pantries have closed, creating the shocking visuals from last weekend showing a line for food in Queens that was 20 blocks long. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

If you’re someone who has fallen in love with Governor Cuomo, the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame is heeding your call. You can pre-order Governor Cuomo bobblehead and the money raised is going to the Million Mask Challenge and the Protect the Heroes fund. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Have we gone too far? Gothamist is calling Governor Cuomo “the Don Draper of politics.” (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Maybe there’s something to this Cuomo idolization, he’s enjoying at 77% approval rating, with 90% support amongst Democrats, 73% with Independents, and 53% with Republicans. By comparison, the president’s approval rating is at 43%. (Joseph Spector for Democrat & Chronicle)

Eater’s top picks, the Eater 38, have been updated for all the restaurants on the list remaining open. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for October 22, 2019 – The “New York City is Dead, RIP Times Square Sbarro” Edition

The biggest jerk in the city, Netflix saves the Paris theater, NYC’s Michelin star restaurants, MTA’s fare evasion police won’t wear body cameras, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Say hello to the 50 most expensive streets in the city. (PropertyClub)

Photos: The Tompkins Square Park Halloween Dog Parade. (Gothamist)

Photos: More from the Tompkins Square Park Halloween Dog Parade. (The Villager)

Photos: Even more from the Tompkins Square Park Halloween Dog Parade. (EV Grieve)

Farewell to City Bakery, closed after 30 years. (Eater)

The Jerk of the Season award goes to this guy in Bay Ridge caught on video smashing pumpkins. (Gothamist)

Kudos to the good samaritan who replaced the destroyed pumpkin. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York City is dead, the Times Square Sbarro is closed. (Grub Street)

Photos: Look inside the NYPL’s beautiful new Center for Research in the Humanities. (Untapped Cities)

The 500 police officers being put into the subways and on buses preventing people from evading $2.75 fares are going to cost about $663 million over the next ten years and they will not be required to wear body cameras because they are not technically part of the NYPD. (Gothamist)

According to Time Out, here are the best Asian restaurants in the city. (Time Out)

Remember last week when WNYC said it was going to cancel the show New Sounds? It’s officially uncanceled and will be streamed instead of broadcasted. (Gothamist)

The 22 greatest bars in NYC. (The Infatuation)

A wall collapsed at the construction site of the former Beth Hamedrash Hagodol synagogue, killing one and seriously injuring another on Monday morning. (Gothamist)

Netflix is saving the Paris theater, at least temporarily. They’ll be showing their movie “Marriage Story,” but there’s no word if the movie theater will stay open after the movie leaves the theater. (6sqft)

It seems the state’s legislature may have enough of hoping that corporations will act responsibly when it comes to local news and are ready to start intervening. (NY Times)

More evidence that if subway performance improves, ridership will increase. (Curbed)

September’s most efficient subway line? It was the 7. (Sunnyside Post)

Here are NYC’s Michelin star restaurants. (Eater)

Apartment Porn: A $13 million apartment with a private rooftop pool. Maybe we can start a GoFundMe for it? (Viewing NYC)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has been chosen! (Time Out)

The Policemen’s Benevolent Association is fighting the oversight question on the ballot, which is enough to vote “yes” on question 2 this November. (Gotham Gazette)

Halloween: 90+ events in the city for $35 and under. (the skint)

I’ll be hosting a special JOHN TRIVIALTA trivia game at Parklife on Halloween night before showing Evil Dead II. There’ll be prizes for the highest scores, the best team name, and a costume contest. (Parklife)

The Briefly for October 18, 2019 – The “What Makes A Beehive A Hipster Beehive?” Weekend Edition

The Rikers replacement plan gets a City Council vote, the weekend’s subway disruptions, ridership on the M14 is up, thrilling breakfast sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Looking to go anywhere on the trains this weekend? Better check the planned subway disruptions before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

The City Council voted to close Rikers Island and the plan to replace it with neighborhood jails in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx is moving forward. (NY Times)

A look back at the Hall of Gems heist at the Museum of Natural History in 1964. (NY Times)

Deep inside the Woolworth Building is a swimming pool that was recently restored in all its stunning glory. (Untapped Cities)

Everyone in the city has enough to worry about before we start with “hipster” beehives. (Gothamist)

The MTA has turned Jay Street-MetroTech into an accessibility “laboratory” with a mix of infrastructure and apps in an attempt to make the station accessible to riders of all abilities. (Curbed)

The Department of Buildings released a new interactive map that tracks after-hours construction permits throughout the city. While it won’t stop the incessant noise, it will help to identify where it’s coming from. (6sqft)

Time Out’s list of the 100 best restaurants in the city has been updated. (Time Out)

The newly-expanded Museum of Modern Art is open, here’s what you need to know. (NY Times)

Brownsville resident Kyle Williams was arrested and charged with murder for the Old Timers Day Festival shooting at the end of July. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you absolutely must dance like an incel on the steps seen in the Joker movie, they’re on W 167th St between Shakespeare and Anderson Aves. (Time Out)

The governors of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania are working together to create standards for vaping safety regulations. (Politico)

The WNBA’s New York York Liberty will return to the city to play games at the Barclays Center after being outcast to Westchester in 2018. If only the Dolan family would sell the Knicks next. (Gothamist)

WNYC is going to end the show New Sounds, hosted by John Schaefer since its debut in 1982 as part of its shift away from music programming. (Gothamist)

A Mrs. Doubtfire musical is coming to Broadway. (Time Out)

The Brooklyn Marathon is Saturday, so get ready for street closures. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Turns out if you make the buses reliable, people want to ride them. Ridership along the M14 bus on 14th St is up since 14th St was cleared of cars. (The Villager)

An NYPD officer fatally shot a man during a traffic stop in the Bronx on Thursday, the second deadly shooting by the NYPD this week and the third time in three days that an officer fired at a suspect. (NY Times)

50-a is a controversial law that shields police personnel records from the public and the state is debating repealing the law. The Police Benevolent Association wants to look like it supports reform but is completely against the idea. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s 86th St has another name: the Pizza Trail. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 12 most thrilling new breakfast sandwiches. (Grub Street)