The Briefly for March 20, 2020 – The “Someone Check on Jen Carlson” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: COVID-19, how to help restaurants, landlords find a loophole in the eviction moratorium, some mortgages are paused, alcohol delivery & pickup guide, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 72˚
Possible light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 50˚

Governor Cuomo suspended mortgage payments for anyone who lost hours or is working part-time. The full details of who is eligible are not available yet, but it’s a step in the right direction. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Okay but what about rent? (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

If you heard that New York was freezing medical and student debt, you didn’t hear the whole story. As usual, it’s more complicated than it sounds and isn’t nearly as wide-spread as it should be. It specifically refers to delinquent debt owed to state-run institutions that were been referred to the Attorney General’s office for collection. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

In the era of coronavirus, 911 calls are getting weird. (EV Grieve)

Someone check on Jen Carlson at Gothamist, because she seems to have fallen in love with the pre-Governor Cuomo press briefing announcement music and dubbed it “Cuomocore.” (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Chinatown’s Nom Wah Tea Parlor is 100-years old. It’s seen the Great Depression, multiple wars, and now COVID-19. Can it survive? (Joshua David Stein for Grub Street)

Video: A bike ride through a desolate Chinatown. (ActionKid)

Whole Foods added an early hour for customers over 60 to allow the most vulnerable to COVID-19 to feel comfortable while shopping for necessities. (EV Grieve)

Our parks will never go unappreciated again, they’ve provided us with a place to go and still stay distant from other New Yorkers. (Ariama Long for Kings County Politics)

“We’re writing to let you know that a positive case of the coronavirus (COVID-19) was found at our facility today.” -A text sent on Wednesday announcing COVID-19 had found its way inside of an Amazon warehouse in Queens. (Olga Khazan for The Atlantic)

Amazon reopened the warehouse after four hours, saying it was disinfected, but employees are skeptical and continue their calls for the company to do more to protects its workforce. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is still cleaning up the panic and confusion that Mayor de Blasio created when he off-handedly decided to make a comment about how he may order the city to shelter-in-place. The governor is the only person who can declare that and he has said multiple times that he never would. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The mayor, desperate, asked Elon Musk for help making ventilators via Twitter. Elon Musk’s companies have never made ventilators, but that didn’t stop him from Tweeting that he thinks that they could. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Are you stir-crazy enough to sing “Yellow Submarine” with your neighbors? (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

A judge put a moratorium on new eviction cases last week, so why can new eviction cases still be filed this week? Landlords have, of course, found a loophole and the confusion is dangerous. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Photos: The city’s transit hubs are barren. (Michelle Young with photos by Aaron Asis for Untapped New York)

The governor further restricted the maximum percent of any company that will be allowed to work onsite to 25% from the previously mandated 50%. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

There are free breakfast and lunch available at local schools for students, but not many are taking advantage of it. (Tribeca Citizen)

“Who cleans those outfits?” is not a common question when it comes to Broadway, but someone has to clean them, right? Unfortunately with Broadway closed, Tony Award winners Ernest Winzer Cleaners is hurting. They give out Tony awards for dry cleaning? I’ve got to re-align my EGOT strategy. (Nancy Coleman for NY Times)

Rose O’Donnell is bringing back ‘The Rosie O’Donnell Show,’ virtually, for one night to raise money for The Actors Fund. You can catch the show streaming on The Actors Fund’s YouTube channel on Sunday at 7 pm. There are over 40 guests lined up for the show. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at The Tiny Cupboard, the self-proclaimed “world’s smallest venue.” It’s up three flights of stairs, behind multiple doors and artist’s spaces, and yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

Add Marie’s Crisis to the list of streaming activities you can take part in during a… crisis. If you’re looking to get loaded and poorly belt out some Broadway tunes, here’s your opportunity. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Biqtch Puddiń is bringing a drag show with over 20 performers to Twitch. You can catch Digital Drag: An Online Drag Show on Friday, March 20 at 7pm. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

New York City’s ambulance crews, which are stretched thin, have been told to work even if exposed to the coronavirus — as long as they are asymptomatic. Last week there was one paramedic infected, now 150 are in quarantine. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

As the city’s hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with patients, 1,000 retired health care professionals are returning to service. Between retired, student, and faculty volunteers, 1,746 have stepped up to help. (Adan Nichols for Patch)

An interview with Rafael Espinal, President of the Freelancers’ Union. (Tyler Wetherall for Brooklyn Based)

The Metropolitan Opera, the largest performing arts organization in the U.S., has laid off all of its union members, including all of the opera’s musicians, chorus singers, and stagehands. The remainder of the Met’s season has been canceled and union employees have been offered health care coverage through the crisis. Non-full-time performers are out of luck. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

This year is the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Wonder Wheel in Coney Island. One day we may be able to celebrate that. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

An interview with and lockdown advice from the author of “How to Drag a Body and Other Safety Tips You Hope to Never Need.” (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

15 NYC bookstores offering curbside pickup and delivery. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Stuyvesant High School admitted ten black students this year, up from seven last year, out of a freshman class of 760. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)
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A list of galleries that are creating online viewing rooms to exhibit art. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A first look at Staten Island’s drive-through center for COVID-19 testing. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Eight Rikers Island detainees have shown COVID-19 symptoms after one inmate in his 30s tested positive. 40 detainees who are considered higher risk are being considered for release in an attempt to prevent further spread. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Use some of your time to do something good this weekend. The Library of Congress has a program called “By the People!,” which is asking for your help to transcribe significant documents. You can even do it while you re-watch Parks & recreation for the 2nd time this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York City Council Members Inez Barron (East New York, Brooklyn) and Richie Torres (Bronx) have tested positive for COVID-19. Inez Barron’s husband Assemblymember Charles Barron announced a few days ago he tested positive. (East New York News)

Dispatches from the last night of drinking in bars. (Nick McManus for Bedford + Bowery)

Here’s what restaurant and delivery workers need to know about the new paid sick leave laws. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

How to help restaurants and bars right now. One thing: Stop using Seamless or GrubHub to order. They haven’t waived their fees (which can be up to 25% of your bill), they’ve only deferred them. Use Seamless to make your decision, but actually call the restaurant and give them all your money directly. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The alcohol delivery & pick-up guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chris for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 26, 2019 – The “The Triboro: Here Comes A New Subway Line” Edition

Rental reforms, Cardi B faces felony charges, the Central Park squirrel census, WorldPride begins, the new I Voted stickers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at changes to the rental laws for everyone. Security deposits are limited to one month’s rent and landlords have 14 days to return them once you’ve moved out, application fees are limited to $20 (even with a background check), and more. (StreetEasy)

A look at how subway delays are tied to the city’s homeless crisis the city is currently facing. In the first three months of 2019, there was nearly the same number of train delays related to the homeless as there was in all of 2014. (NY Times)

Manhattan post-work bar picks. (amNY)

The Triboro is an idea for a new subway line that would start in the Bronx, stop in Randall’s Island, head down through Astoria, cut through Ridgewood and cut through the southern parts of Brooklyn down to Bay Ridge and possibly continue on to the St. George, where the Staten Island Ferry terminates. While it sounds like a fantasy, the proposed cost is less than half of the Second Avenue subway, would connect 17 different subway lines along the route. A bill was introduced by Latrice Walker to the state assembly that would require the MTA to conduct a feasibility study. (Welcome2TheBronx)

How to spend 10 hours in Greenpoint. (Brooklyn Based)

Louis CK continues to have problems with consent when it comes to the venues he performs in. Brooklyn Bazaar released an apology after the masturbating-into-a-plant-while-blocking-the-door comedian appeared at a rental event as a “surprise.” (BrooklynVegan)

The MTA may never make your commute smoother, but a change in perspective and a decent amount of patience can go a long way, which is what author Reny Amoros set out to do in ‘7 Life Lessons the NYC Subway Unintentionally Taught Me.’ (Reny Amoros)

Video: Capturing the ‘Beyond the Streets’ graffiti and street art exhibit in one minute by Chop ‘Em Down Films. (Brooklyn Street Art)

Passive-aggressive notes never go far in NYC, and the one Nobletree Coffee left as a reason for their closing faired just as well. After they tried to blame low foot traffic in the neighborhood, their note was met with another accusing them of having mediocre coffee and bad service. (Eater)

As Gowanus’ rezoning hangs over the neighborhood like the sword of Damaclese, the Landmarks Preservation Commission put five buildings in the neighborhood into consideration for landmark status. (Curbed)

The city’s schools are coming up short when it comes to room for special education children in pre-Kindergarten. At the low end, the city is 200 seats short, but program closures put the number closer to 300. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Harbir Parmar was sentenced to three years in prison for kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman who was supposed to be his Uber fare. He also charged her over $1,000 for the trip and for that he plead guilty of wire fraud. (Gothamist)

A list of places for tourists to go (none of them are “straight to hell) during WorldPride. (NY Times)

These new “I Voted” stickers are boring compared to the subway-themed stickers. (Gothamist)

The first of three ASPCA low-cost vet centers will be built in East New York and is expected to open next year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Whoops. Looks like Cardi B will be facing 14 total charges, including felonies, a big difference from the two misdemeanors she previously faced for the incident. (Gothamist)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District, which consists of 54 row houses constructed between 1906 and 1913. (Curbed)

Feltman’s was the original Coney Island hot dog. For two years a revival of the brand was available in Coney Island, but the operators of Luna Park gave Feltman’s the boot following a series of broken promises from Luna Park. The hot dogs are available elsewhere, but no longer in Coney Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Stranger Things will be taking over the Wonder Wheel (which is not a part of Luna Park) On July 4 and through the weekend as a prelude to Stranger Things season 3, Scoops Ahoy will be selling ice cream, ad the July 4 fireworks will be a special Hawkins Fourth of July Spectacular. (amNY)

Desmond Amofah, a YouTube star who went by Etika, went missing last week was found dead in the East River at the age of 29. (Gothamist)

Is there anything our current president’s administration can’t ruin? On the verge of WorldPride the news came out that the federal government “gifted” a flagpole and LGBT pride flag the NYC Parks Department so it wouldn’t have to appear in a national park. As a result, the NYC Parks Department permanently owns the flagpole. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority, who recently complained that Manhattan’s congestion pricing would be financially unfair to people who use its bridges and tunnels, is looking to raise the price of tolls system-wide and place new tolls on Uber and Lyft drivers accessing any of the area’s airports. The board will vote on it in September. (Politico)

The 2019 Central Park Squirrel Census Report is in! There are 2,373 squirrels that live in Central Park. If you really love squirrels or well-designed products, you can also purchase the Census in book form. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A trip to (and photos from) the Department of Sanitation’s Museum of Trash. (Gothamist)

The everything bagel is everything. Sesame and poppy seeds, accompanied by dried garlic, onion, and salt: Anything else, in addition, is against the law( or it should be). Now that we’ve established that the everything bagel is king of the bagels, who invented the combination? Does the lineage go back further than 1979 at Charlie’s Bagels in Howard Beach? (Atlas Obscura)

Photos from the start of WorldPride. (NY Times)

Facebook is looking at a one million-square-foot lease at 50 Hudson Yards. No public announcement, no massive tax breaks, no helicopter pad on the roof. (The Real Deal)

The Broadway show King Kong announced it will be closing in August after disappointing reviews and ticket sales. (NY Times)

20 of the city’s tastiest and quirkiest ice cream shops. (6sqft)

The mayor’s office lobbied, against a change in the city’s charter aimed at allowing the Civilian Complaint Review Board to prosecute discipline charges when police officers lie during an investigation of misconduct. The mayor’s argument is that the current system works fine. (Gotham Gazette)

Do the police belong at Pride? (NY Times)

21 top restaurants in Flatiron and Gramercy. (Eater)

The Briefly for May 29, 2019 – The “Amazon Comes Crawling Back” Edition

20,000 bees on a street corner, legal weed gains steam (again), 10 hidden bars and restaurants, Manhattanhenge, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is releasing the results of its study of water fountain parks and the results will inspire you to carry a water bottle with you at all times. (QNS)

Tonight kicks off one of four nights of the year to see Manhattanhenge. (Viewing NYC)

They always come crawling back. Amazon is looking for office space in Midtown West. This won’t likely be 25,000 new jobs, but it seems they can’t stay away. (Curbed)

The top 10 secrets of Citi Field. Some people say if you listen hard enough, you can hear a baseball team playing. (Untapped Cities)

Photos from inside the new Essex Market. (Gothamist)

Nothing to see here, just 20,000 bees hanging out on a street corner in Sunnyside. (Sunnyside Post)

If you’re a superfan of the MTV’s first season of The Real World: New York and have about $8 million sitting around, you’re in luck. The loft is for sale. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel’s food hall reopened after a failed health inspection last week. (Eater)

Luna Park housing in Coney Island is losing $500,000 after one of the people in charge was arrested for accepting bribes to help unqualified applicants get apartments. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Kudos to Grub Street for leaving out the most obvious possible entries to their list of 10 hidden restaurants and bars. (Grub Street)

The woman who was hit by a falling branch in Washington Square Park last week is doing better and her doctors are optimistic. Her injuries from the falling branch included skull and spine fractures. (Downtown Express)

Measles cases in Brooklyn have spread beyond the Orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn and the numbers have hit the double digits. Sunset Park has a high vaccination rate and the outbreak should be contained. The city’s total number is up to 535. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The calls for an end to the religious exemption for vaccines are growing. (Patch)

Community Board 6 attempted to save Red Hook’s Lidgerwood Building which dates back to 1882 with a plea to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but it was demolished last weekend to make way for a UPS facility. (Bklyner)

Video: The next best thing to riding the Wonder Wheel is experiencing it in 4k and 60 frames per second. (ActionKid)

A look at the life of the Lincoln Memorial’s sculptor Daniel Chester French, a resident of Greenwich Village. (GVSHP)

RIP the second incarnation of Hank’s Saloon. The owners of Hill Country Barbeque Market are shutting down their food hall and evicting Hank’s in the process. (Gothamist)

Sports betting in New York? The governor says it’s possible. (Politico)

17 waterfront restaurants to enjoy when we’re not being threatened with tornado warnings. (Eater)

Mina Malik joined fellow candidate Tiffany Cabán in announcing that as the Queens District Attorney, she will not prosecute sex workers. (QNS)

Momentum is growing (again) for marijuana legalization, but we’ve heard this song twice this year without results. The bill doesn’t have the governor’s full support. The governor cites a lack of support from the legislature and the legislature cites a lack of support from the governor. (Gothamist)

Following the moves of the workers of the Tenement Museum, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, and the New Museum, BAM workers are seeking to unionize. (Bedford + Bowery)

The personal hip-hop collection of Fab 5 Freddy was purchased by the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, which will ensure that the earliest days of hip-hop have a permanent home as a piece of history. (Atlas Obscura)

Turns out allowing cyclists to follow pedestrian signals and not traffic lights would make the streets safer, according to a new study from the city. (amNY)

Where to drink right now. The Infatuation’s regularly updated list has been, as you might have guessed, updated with Coast and Valley and Jungle Bird. (The Infatuation)

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