The Briefly for November 13, 2019 – The “Staten Island Revisits Secession from New York City” Edition

The city’s first hair discrimination case is settled, Penn Station is about to get worse, a 22.5-foot arm appears in Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Queens has a new Boulevard of Death, and it’s Jewel Ave. (Streetsblog)

The first hair discrimination case in the city has been resolved. Sally Hershberger and partner Sharon Dorram lost a $70k lawsuit after former workers were told that their hairstyles didn’t fit a dress code, specifically that “afros and box-braid hairstyles did not reflect the upscale image of the neighborhood.” (The Root)

Staten Island wants to secede from NYC. (Gothamist)

Penn Station’s multi-year renovation means that the already depressing station will become even more dour when it loses about 17 businesses including Shake Shack, Magnolia Bakery, two Starbucks, a Pretty and Godiva. (Eater)

Can an opinion be wrong? In the case of the “Can We Talk About Womanspreading?” opinion piece that ran in the Daily News, the answer is yes. Claire Lampen read it, so you don’t have to. (Gothamist)

Last night’s sunset was spectacular. (@mikiodo)

What’s the point of adding 500 cops to the subways to police fare evasion? Rationally minded folks aren’t the only ones asking that question, the MTA’s board is also starting to ask that same question. (Gothamist)

More cops of better service? The number of crimes on the subway are down, no matter what fantasy Governor Cuomo wants to create to justify spending more than half a billion dollars on new subway cops. The governor if you ask 100 people on the subway if they want more cops on the subways, 75 would say yes, so amNewYork went down and started asking. (amNewYork)

Dr. Sun Yat-sen received a monument in Chinatown at Columbus Park, adding Dr Sun’s name to the park’s plaza as well. He was a pioneer in the reform of China in 1911 and the monument has “All Under Heaven Are Equal” inscribed on the pedestal. (amNewYork)

This week is the best week for forest bathing. What’s forest bathing? I don’t really know. It’s kind of like taking a walk in the trees but different? (Gothamist)

The East Side Costal Resiliency (ESCR) project is headed for a full City Council vote on Thursday, which will decide the future of the East River Park and how the Lower East Side is protected from storms and the rising sea. (Curbed)

There are 40 NYCHA developments without gas, some without gas since April. City Comptroller Scott Stringer argues that if gas is not supplied for an extended period of time that the NYCHA should be offering food reimbursement and monthly bill abatements to compensate. (amNewYork)

Is the one minute you can spend inside the “Infinity Mirrored Room” at David Zwirner in Chelsea worth the potentially very long wait? (NY Times)

Looking for restaurants serving Thanksgiving dinner this year? (Patch)

How to choose an apartment based on the school district. (StreetEasy)

With the help of Lin-Manuel Miranda and some Hamilton collaborators, the Drama Book Shop will be opening its new location on W 39th in the spring and operated by the company that operates Hamilton’s gift shop. (NY Times)

Third Ave in Sunset Park between 20th and 30th Streets underneath the Gowanus Expressway is becoming a hub for RV parking. (amNewYork)

A rezoning in Woodside was given the thumbs up by Community Board 2 that will bring 60 apartments to 52nd St near Queens Blvd with parking, a community facility, and commercial space. (Sunnyside Post)

Last weekend saw a spike in hate crimes reported in Brooklyn, most anti-Semitic in nature. (amNewYork)

The National Grid / Governor Cuomo war of words hasn’t ended. The governor once again raised the threat of revoking National Grid’s license to operate in the southern part of the state. (NY Times)

Someone broke into the conductor cab on a 1 train and bean screaming “I have a fucking gun!” into the train’s PA system. Chaos ensued, as you might expect, but no one was found with a gun and no injuries were reported. (Gothamist)

RIP Charlie Gordon. Astoria’s Sandwich King, who established Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli in Astoria. (LIC Post)

Unity is a 22.5-foot bronze sculpture of an arm pointing towards the sky in Downtown Brooklyn by Hank Willis Thomas. The piece is “in homage to, and celebration of, the unique and multifaceted character of the borough of Brooklyn. There is one finger raised, but it’s not the Brooklyn salute you might assume. It’s the index finger. (Untapped New York)

Hall & Oates is hitting the road and MSG is on their list for February 28. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Single-Story Project,” from Adam Friedberg on view at the Center for Architecture captures 100 one-story buildings in the East Village and Lower East Side. It seems almost impossible that with the city as dense as it is that there are that many one-story buildings remaining. (Curbed)

Take a look inside Norah Jones’ $8 million circa-1843 Cobble Hill home, which includes a master suite terrace and a hot tub and pool in the backyard. (Curbed)

Are your neighbors’ security cameras spying on you? (NY Times)

The hottest restaurants in Queens this month. (Eater)

The Briefly for November 7, 2019 – The “Lubing Up the Cube in Astor Place” Edition

A list of lying NYPD officers, low voter turnout in this year’s elections, no one wants to live in Turtle Bay, the best coffee shop in the US, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The sweet spot for rent in the city might be $2,700 and four other things you need to know about the city’s real estate market. (StreetEasy)

The life, death, and rebirth of the Orchard Street pedestrian mall, the only street in the city that closes on Sundays to become a pedestrian mall. (Bowery Boogie)

A look at how gentrification has changed Fort Greene. (NY Times)

How does the cube in Astor Place stay able to spin? It gets lubed. (EV Grieve)

Commercial rent control may be how the city fights the retail vacancy crisis. (Gothamist)

Death certificates for overdoses in New York state must state a type of opioid thanks to a bill signed into law by Governor Cuomo on Tuesday. (amNewYork)

“The Seated IV” from Wangechi Mutu, which sits outside the Met as part of the facade, will be on display until June, instead of coming to an end in January. (NY Times)

Gothamist/WNYC has been fighting to get the secret list that each of the five borough District Attorneys maintains of cops who have been accused of dishonesty. Thanks to a successful Freedom of Information request, a three-page list of liar cops from the Brooklyn DA’s office was released on Wednesday. (Gothamist)

Who wants to live in Turtle Bay or Midtown? That question might be harder to answer than you think. Of the entire city, those are the two neighborhoods with the most real estate price drops in October. (amNewYork)

The best restaurants in Inwood. (The Infatuation)

Not much of the city voted on Tuesday. Only 13.9% of registered voters actually voted. While early voting was supposed to make voting easier, the locations were limited to 33 across the entire city. The mayor is hoping to increase that number to 100 for the 2020 election. (amNewYork)

James O’Neill is leaving his commissionership with the NYPD for a security job at Visa. (Patch)

The best coffee shop in the USA is Sey Coffee on Grattan Street in Bushwick, according to Food & Wine magazine. (Patch)

The definitive guide to the Hudson Yards development boom. (Curbed)

A $50 million triplex penthouse on Central Park West, once belonging to Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, can be yours if you’ve got $50 million lying around. (StreetEasy)

The president will return to the city that hates him to kick off Monday’s Veteran’s Day parade in Manhattan. This just went from parade to shit show. (amNewYork)

Where to go for affogato, the city’s newest must-try dessert, vanilla gelato with espresso poured over it. (Eater)

The Long Island City Clock Tower is going to go through a restoration that will start and end next year. (LIC Post)

120,000 pounds of clothes were collected for donation at the start of the NYC Marathon, with those clothes going to Goodwill. Since 2012 a million pounds have been collected and donated. (amNewYork)

Once the L train’s signal updates are complete, the M train is the next line to be upgraded and inconvenienced by late-night service disruptions while they’re being installed. (amNewYork)

Billy Eichner remains the only person I want one of the hundreds that call Met Life Stadium home. (Gothamist)

The best restaurants in Sunnyside and Woodside. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

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