The Briefly for February 11, 2020 – The “Brokers’ Fees Are Unbanned” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The subway mascot Cardvaark, the hottest restaurants in Queens, a sleepover at IKEA, the plastic bag ban, an Oreo slide, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.

Congrats to the Barclays Center subway stop, which has the city’s worst privately owned subway elevator functioning for only 74.2% of 2019, out of service for a total of three months of the year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Video: Go behind the scenes and back in time with this Metropolitan Museum of Art behind the scenes tour from 1928. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Remember when brokers’ fees were banned? Brokers’ fees have been unbanned, temporarily at least. The Real Estate Board of New York sued the state and the judge put a temporary restraining order on the rule. Snip snap. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hulu is taking over Rough Trade this weekend in an installation to promote the new Hulu version of High Fidelity. (Grant Lancaster for amNewyork Metro)

New York is the ninth most dangerous state for online dating, which takes into account internet crime rates and STI transmission rates. The safest site for online dating is Maine and the most dangerous is Alaska, which has the country’s highest man to woman ratio. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best bars on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aldea, which arrives a Michelin star, is closing on February 22. Chef George Mendes cites plans to “take a break, recharge creatively, and refocus,” with no other reason given for the closure. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Pizza Rat won Gothamist’s poll for the new subway mascot, but let’s not forget the subway’s previous mascot, Cardvaark, who looks like everyone’s least coolest cousin wearing a homemade Halloween outfit, who was supposed to help us all transition from tokens to MetroCards. Fun fact, the same person who brought us Cardvaark also brought us Poetry in Motion. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, so you’re moving from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Here are 19 answers to common questions. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

The NYPD is reporting 2019 saw the first rise in the number of Stop and Frisks since 2013, up 22% from 2018. An NYPD spokesperson, who must think that we’re all stupid, said that it’s “unlikely to be a true increase in stops but rather more accurate and complete reporting.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

With a history of racist and victim-blaming comments, does the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s Ed Mullins really speak for the actual NYPD? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

Take a deep breath in and release that tension in your body. The Yankees have reported for spring training, which means actual spring is coming. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Everything you need to know about NYC’s citywide ferry. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban, which kicks into gear in less than three weeks. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Manhattan’s community boards are older than the borough’s population, homeowners hold a disproportionately high number of seats and Hispanic people are underrepresented. Not a great representation. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Ann Choi for The City)

Oreo is building a giant inflatable slide in Herald Square that will open February 21st, so when you’re in Herald Square and your friends see the slide and ask what it is, you can look effortlessly cool by telling them “Oreo put it up.” (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted to sleep in the Red Hook IKEA, here’s your chance. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

After an ICE agent shot Eric Diaz in the face, it’s time to ask if New York City really a sanctuary city? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

The Reckless Driver Accountability Act will require drivers who rack up five red light tickets or 15 school speed zone violations within a one year period to take a safe driving course or they’ll lose their car until they do. The bill is expected to pass City Council this week. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Cupid’s Undie Run, kind of like a street version of the No Pants Subway Ride but for charity, hit the streets last weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Video: ‘Commute’ by Scott Lazer is a beautiful film, shot on 16mm, even if it’s focused on Penn Station in rush hour. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

1 Dot = 1 Person. Explore how racially divided the city is using 2010 census data. (Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service)

Feds to the Hudson River rail tunnel: Drop Dead. (Ryan Hutchins for Politico)

Another day, another water main break. This time the water main on South Street near Pike Slio broke, flooding the area. (Bowery Boogie)

R40, La Rotisserie du Coin, La Mian Lounge join the hottest restaurants in Queens.

Featured photo sent in from reader @mfireup

The Briefly for January 3, 2020 – The “Your Choice of Subway Seat is Always Wrong” Edition

Today’s daily NY news digest: The weekend’s subway changes, sales in Trump buildings fall behind the rest of the city, revisiting Di Fara pizza, Manhattan’s hottest restaurants and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 49˚
Light rain until morning, starting again in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 52˚

Lance at Subway Weekender has retired his blog detailing the weekend’s subway delays. I’m working on either finding a replacement or doing this work myself. In the meantime, check the MTA’s giant list of everything happening to avoid being stranded by the trains this weekend.

Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero is modeled on a Swedish approach that views all deaths as preventable. If that’s the case why did the deaths of pedestrians, motorists, and cyclists increase in 2019? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

There’s an unlikely place to find the city’s history: postcards. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

What is the best subway seat? This meme lasted less than a day before de Blasio and Bloomberg ruined the fun. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The Times has the best answer. Your answer is obviously wrong. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

A record collection that rivals the one maintained by the Library of Congress sits in Tribeca needs a new home. (Derek K. Norman for NY Times)

David Hay, the deputy chief of staff to schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, was fired after he was arrested for allegedly trying to arrange sex with an underage boy online. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

Turns out David Hay, hired by the Department of Education, never received a completed background investigation. The Department of Investigation’s Background Investigation Unit has backlog of thousands of files. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

6 crucial ways New York City’s landscape will change in 2020. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Cardell Gadsden, a corrections officer from Rikers Island, was arrested after he allegedly murdered his uncle Steven Gadsden on the Upper West Side on Thursday. Gadsden was suspended without pay. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The 79th Street Boat Basin is the only spot in the city where houseboats can dock year-round. At the moment there’s room for 33 boats and there is a 14-year waitlist for a lease. The Department of Parks is planning a $90 million renovation to triple capacity with construction starting late 2021 or early 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The city’s laws require employers to provide employees with lactation areas, but that doesn’t seem to matter to the NYPD, according to a new lawsuit. Five women are suing the NYPD for forcing them to pump breast-milk in rooms full of garbage bed bugs, their cars, and bathrooms. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Lasagna. Is this really going to be 2020’s food trend? We can survive anything after the 2019 horny chicken parm craze. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Video: Think you’ve got what it takes to keep up with a Rockette? You don’t. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Following a rash of anti-Semitic violence in recent weeks, Brooklyn elected officials are calling for dialogue and camaraderie between the borough’s black and Jewish populations. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Brooklyn House of Detention officially closed on Thursday. The remaining 390 detainees moved to other facilities, including Rikers Island. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Ok Kang, 70, is the first pedestrian in the city killed by a driver in 2020 on Northern Boulevard, the “New Boulevard of Death.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A man was caught on video literally trying to grab a sleeping woman on the subway and carry her off the train. The man, Sonny Alloway, was arrested and claims to have been attacked on the street multiple times since the video went public and offered $5,000 to anyone who attacked him if they can knock him out in a boxing match. For $5,000 I might consider giving it a try! (Brooklyn Baldwin for The Root)

The annoyances and adoration of Di Fara pizza. (Michael Fiorito for Red Hook Star-Revue)

All buses on the B44 SBS route are now equipped with the transit agency’s new Automated Bus Lane Enforcement system, issuing fines to cars caught illegally in the bus lane. Doesn’t it defeat the purpose of the system if the MTA announces that its use is limited to the B44, M14, and M15? (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NY Post continues to be the NY Post. Offensive, exploitative, and I am 100% here for Gothamist shitting on the worst publication in the city. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

NY Yankees Pitcher Domingo German will miss 63 games after accepting a suspension for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend last September. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

NYC Ferry’s ridership was up by 32% in 2019. The increase includes the new Lower East Side and Soundview routes. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Farrell’s Bar and Grill is one of Brooklyn’s oldest bars, dating back to 1933. The biggest change might be the bar’s signature styrofoam cups gave way when the city banned them. Two Brooklynites are raising funds to produce a documentary about the bar that hasn’t changed despite the changes to the city around it. (Scott Unman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Sales at Trump-branded condos continue to fall behind the rest of Manhattan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The hottest restaurants in Manhattan, January 2020 edition. (Stefanie Tuder and Serena Dai for Eater)

The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)