The Briefly for July 26, 2019 – The “A Green Wave is Declared” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, Katz declares victory in the Queens DA recount (Cabán does not concede), a $1k meal, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway disruptions are pretty rough. Rider beware. (Subway Weekender)

Breaking down the city’s “Green Wave” plan: 30 miles of protected bike lanes per year, heavier enforcement on trucks, better intersection design, the bike lane crackdown becomes permanent, and “outreach” to motorists. (Streetsblog)

Part of the problem is the NYPD, which blames cyclists after drivers hit and kill them with their cars. Here’s a video of two NYPD officers incorrectly stating that cyclists should dismount their bikes and walk when crossing certain intersections. For clarification, there is never a situation where a cyclist has to dismount their bike in order to cross an intersection. (Gothamist)

The protests worked. Warren B. Kanders resigned as a vice-chairman of the Whitney after protests singled him out after his tear-gas grenades were used against migrants at the U.S./Mexico border. This follows the museums refusing gifts from the Sackler family, the family of billionaire monsters who were behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

A look at lower Manhattan’s privately owned public spaces and the politics that are slowly turning them from actual public spaces to food halls and retail. (Curbed)

The world’s smallest cinema? The Hoxton Hotel has made a big claim about a tiny movie theater they’ve located inside their elevator vestibule. (Untapped Cities)

Heard about the DoorDash scandal but haven’t gotten the details? Here’s what you need to know about it. Also, if you have a favorite restaurant to order from, consider ordering from them directly to better patronize them. (Grub Street)

Amtrak says they’re on pace with their infrastructure upgrades at Penn Station to be completed by Labor Day, which means fewer disruptions for the Long Island Rail Road. (amNY)

A Lime electric bicycle caught fire after exploding in Rockaway Beach this week. This wasn’t a malfunction, according to the company someone tried to break the bike’s lock and instead punctured the battery, which lead to the malfunction. Yikes. (Curbed)

The city started a Residential Loading Zone Evaluation pilot program, removing parking spaces from certain neighborhoods to give delivery vehicles and for-hire vehicles a place to temporarily stop instead of double parking or parking in bike lanes, which is a nuisance to other drivers but has proven deadly to cyclists. (Streetsblog)

The history of the city’s first drag landmark: the Pyramid Club. (GVSHP)

If you thought this summer is hot, wait until the end of the century, when almost a full month of the year will be over 105 degrees without global intervention against climate change. (Patch)

On election night, it was Tiffany Cabán that declared victory and Melinda Katz that refused to concede. As the results of the recount are imminent, it’s Melinda Katz has declared victory and Tiffany Cabán has refused to concede. (amNY)

No matter the outcome of the Queens DA recount, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s reputation has taken a hit as a result of the campaign juxtaposing her point-of-view against the much more progressive Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

The election results won’t be certified until Tuesday, but sources put Katz’s lead over Caban at 60 votes. Next stop: court. (Politico)

Got a love of Korean food and a thousand dollars you don’t want? Atomix’s ten-course tasting meal with wine pairings will take care of you with a cost of $928 after taxes but before tip. (Eater)

The social and cultural Puerto Rican history of the East Village in the wake of the governor of Puerto Rico resigning. (6sqft)

A needed change could be coming to the city’s elections, but it has to be approved as a ballot measure for November’s elections. A look at that and the other ballot initiatives coming our way. (Patch)

This is what Manhattan’s first public beach will look like. (6sqft)

The mayor and city council are pushing for two weeks of paid vacation for every employee, small businesses are pushing back. (Gotham Gazette)

A threat of gentrification can cause stress in a neighborhood. The story of a Sean Price mural and a kosher restaurant in Crown Heights illustrates that story and that stress perfectly. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 6th Annual Macaulay Culkin Show Summer Comedy Festival at The Bell House is bringing something to the festival that has never happened before. Macaulay Culkin. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The men who poured water on NYPD officers are facing a tougher punishment than the man whose chokehold lead to Eric Garner’s death. Why? (NY Times)

The place that gave the world rainbow bagels was seized by the state’s tax department for not paying almost a million dollars in taxes. (Eater)

Some of the city’s private schools are joining with yeshivas to fight the state’s demands that their students be taught basic English, math, and science. (Gothamist)

Who hasn’t had the dream of finding an expensive work of art in a thrift shop? A drawing in a Queens thrift shop turns out to be from Austrian Expressionist Egon Schiele and worth over $200,000. (Patch)

Eating weeds? Yup. Meet the former corporate lawyer supplying the city’s top restaurant with weeds to be used in dishes in the city’s top restaurants. (Viewing NYC)

Diving into the 40-year history of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. (amNY)

The most exciting restaurant pop-ups to check out, some of them end their run this weekend. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Lillia for the photo of Hellgate Farms!

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The Briefly for May 14, 2019 – The “Four Billion Dollar Leaky Roof” Edition

Bill de Blasio tries to hold a rally, another yeshiva is closed, more speed cameras are coming to the city, a wallaby has a new home, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Video: How much do you love your partner? Enough to get married on the Q train? (ABC 7 NY)

It seems like a bad idea to stop paying your mortgage for five years, but that’s what legendarily stubborn Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer did with her four-story Upper West Side townhouse in protest of a tax issue. (The City)

This is your weekly warning that if you have allergies, never leave the house. This week will bring blooming flowers and misery for you while the tree and grass pollen count remains very high or high through Monday. (Patch)

The Oculus is leaking. After spending $4 billion on the building, $32 million on the skylight, and $30,000 on filling leaks with sealant, you’d think the problem would be under control. The Port Authority will replace the skylight’s rubber seal this summer. (6sqft)

The new Essex Market opened its doors, across the street from the original location. (Eater)

10 fun facts about the new Essex Market. You can’t have an opening without some fun facts! (Untapped Cities)

Video: Watch 24 hours of city transit in one minute. (Will Geary)

Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer accused of choking Eric Garner to death, faces a possible firing during his NYPD internal trial. Pantaleo’s lawyer says he did not use a chokehold and did not have his arm around Eric Garner’s throat when Garner was saying he could not breathe. The trial will last two weeks. (Patch)

With the new price of a MetroCard and no bonuses, does a value or a timed card make more sense? More often than not, even if you commute to work 5x a week, the pay per ride card is a cheaper option. (Gothamist)

Award-winning cocktails and vegan BBQ in the East Village. (Bedford + Bowery)

Mayor de Blasio attempted to create a vision of a man who was running for president by mounting a climate change rally outside of Trump Tower only to be heckled by people with “Trump 2020” and “Worst Mayor Ever” signs. The man no one wants to see run for president said that he’ll make his decision this week about if he wants to spend the next year of his life on a losing endeavor instead of his job as mayor. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio was attempting to tout the city’s New Green Deal’s impact on the Trump Organization, which will cost the company millions of dollars in fines if they don’t renovate their buildings to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. (Splinter)

Subway maps used to be pretty cool, as evidence of this map from 1958. (Viewing NYC)

It appears that marijuana legalization in New York is on life support. (NY Times)

63% of city voters changing the SHSAT to boost diversity, with 57% willing to scrap the test altogether. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“What the hell does the ‘night mayor’ even do?” No one’s really sure, but at the very least the night mayor’s office has a Facebook and Instagram account now. (BrooklynVegan)

This year a New York Times piece by an Aperol Spritz denier kicked up a city-wide argument in defense of the summer-y drink. There will be a “Rally for Aperol” on Friday, which sounds less like a rally and more like a sponsored event at a bar. (Time Out)

Manhattanhenge approcheth. (I Love the Upper West Side)

An update on Charter Communications, the company trying to buy Time Warner Cable and was subsequently told to leave New York because of poor service, broken promises, and defrauding the state. They’re being allowed to stay after promising they won’t break any more promises. (Boing Boing)

Howie, the wallaby that ended up in the case of the Animal Care Centers of NYC, will find a new home in the Bronx Zoo. (Patch)

The governor signed a bill into law that will increase the number of speed cameras in school zones from 140 to 750 this summer, which makes last year’s fight over cameras feel like an extremely distant memory. The cameras will operate from 6am to 10pm. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here are the eight hopefuls in the 45th Council District in Flatbush’s special election, vying for Jumaane William’s former seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Is this the subway car of the future? Forget high tech, just give us a place to stand where our crotch isn’t directly in someone’s face while they eat their carton of egg salad. (Cheddar)

If you’re someone who collected limited edition MetroCards, 9/11 Emergency Responder MetroCard will soon be available at 10 stations. If you’d like to avoid a daily reminder of the city’s terrorist disaster, there are 10 stations you should not buy your MetroCard at. (Gothamist)

A yeshiva in Queens was closed as the city’s cases of the measles is nearly at 500 people. Eight of the nine schools and daycare centers previously closed have reopened under Department of Health supervision. (amNY)

Video: A tour from a real New York insider. Richard Splett’s New York Splett of Mind for Splettnet.net. Richard Splett was recently Richard Splett on HBO’s Veep. (Splettnet)

The five best chocolate chip cookies in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for May 3, 2019 – The “Eternal Existential Dread of Existing As A Subway Turnstile” Edition

The “Festival of Balls,” the Summer of Hell: Part 2, Democrats are shifting NY’s legal system, an NYU Doctor tells you how to consume CBD, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’re taking just about any train this weekend, you better check the trains because everything looks like a mess. (Subway Changes)

The city’s fatbergs are costing us $20 million a year, all because we flush wet wipes. Remembe,r only flush your three P’s. (amNY)

The “Festival of Balls” isn’t quite what you think it is. (Time Out)

We all feel this subway turnstile’s existential dread. (Viewing NYC)

The would-be subway bomber was sentenced to a ten-years in prison, but since it happened in 2009, he’s scheduled to get out of prison in a few days. (amNY)

Brooklyn’s comedy scene wouldn’t be what it is without Littlefield, which is celebrating ten years of eclectic fun this month. Here’s an interview with co-owner Julie Kim about the history and future of the Gowanus’ heart. (amNY)

The United Talmudical Academy network of Yeshivas has been cited more than 10 times for failing to turn over medical records showing if its students have been vaccinated. The schools owe over $2,400 in fines and could face an additional $10,000. The school’s new policy will expel children who don’t have the MMR vaccination. (Gothamist)

The mayor’s presidential decision is coming this month, god help us all. The best thing that he’s able to say about it is that his family hasn’t told him not to. (amNY)

The anti-de Blasio presidential train keeps on rolling. A flyer at the gym where the mayor works out accused him of not wiping down his gym equipment after he uses it and for some reason he admitted it was true. (Patch)

Who is this new villain in the city who is stealing eggs from the Prospect Park swans? (Gothamist)

The city’s CBD in food and drink ban was postponed until June but until then, here’s an interview with a doctor from NYU on the best way to consume it. (Gothamist)

Where to find “affordable” housing in NYC. (Curbed)

Is the removal of 17 stops along the 14th St and Lower East Side routes of the M14 bus elder abuse? Depends on who you ask. (Gothamist)

Get into the bathtub and eat this bubble bath. This is art, and no, it is not in Bushwick! (Time Out)

Who loves James Dolan? Literally nobody. He’s being sued by MSG’s shareholders for paying himself a $75.6 million salary and only working part-time because of the time he dedicates to his awful band, JD and the Straight Shot. Anyone with a set of ears should sue him for his band. (Gothamist)

A list of great places to eat ice cream. (Grub Street)

From the “no one asked for your support” files, Morrissey voiced his support for the city’s proposed fur-sale ban. (amNY)

With Democrats in control of the state’s Legislature, they are pushing New York’s legal system in a different direction from its historic tough stance against defendants. (NY Times)

Video from a drone flying over Governors Island. Nothing more, nothing less. (Gothamist)

A look inside the oldest house in Manhattan, with a dash of ghost hunting on the side. (NYC Lens)

Brooklyn’s most prolific developer was handed an eviction notice for its own headquarters. (The Real Deal)

It certainly seems like commuters who take trains into Penn Station are facing a sequel to 2017’s Summer of Hell. (NBC New York)

The 25 best pancakes in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)

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