The Briefly for February 12-13, 2021 – The “Mayor of Flavortown for Mayor of NYC” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining returns today, new vaccination sites, mayoral candidates want more power over the MTA, splurge-worthy takeout and more

Today – Low: 21˚ High: 29˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 27˚ High: 37˚

• The annual Valentine’s Day tour of the Shit Tits in Greenpoint, the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility, is going virtual. All the experience with none of the smell. of the city’s largest sewage plant. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

• Forget the mayor of NYC. The Mayor of Flavortown is back in Manhattan. All hail Guy Fieri. (Erika Adams for Eater)

• Photos: Go back in time with this newly digitized library of photos of Central PArk in the 80s. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

• Remember when the NYPD started babysitting Christopher Columbus statues across the city? Well the NYPD are still babysitting these statues ten months later. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Construction will begin in the spring on Gansevoort Peninsula, Manhattan’s first public beach. The park will be built off Little West 12th St. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

• In a surprise to everyone, New York concert venues and arenas can reopen on February 23. Each venue’s safety plan needs to be reviewed by the state, everyone needs proof of a negative PCR test within 3 days of the event, and venues that hold over 10,000 will have a maximum capacity of 10%. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

How NYC’s bars and restaurants are preparing for today’s return to indoor dining. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

“We’re grateful to be able to provide our guests with a slice of hope through an experience as simple as dining out. We welcome indoor dining not only as a lifeline for our business, but also as an opportunity to safely bring our customers a little more normalcy in these very abnormal times.”
– Simone Tiligna, co-owner of Sola Pasta Bar, Why I’m Opening My Restaurant for Indoor Dining in NYC for Eater

“One wonders why Cuomo can’t wait a little longer for more vaccines to come online, instead of conducting such a grand social experiment on a group of staffers who have disproportionately struggled during the pandemic. Latinx folks, for example, have suffered COVID death rates that are nearly double those of white New Yorkers.”
– Ryan Sutton, Cuomo’s Reckless Return to Indoor Dining Values NYC Restaurants Over Lives, for Eater

The top two affordable neighborhoods in NYC are Parkchester and Bedford Park in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde FOR Welcome2TheBronx)

• 2021 will be the year of legal marijuana in New York state? Maybe. Governor Cuomo and Democrats in the legislature can’t get on the same page when it comes to legal weed. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

• The NYPD announced that it is ready to relinquish that responsibility to another city agency. The City Council is already debating stripping the NYPD of that responsibility as part of a package of bills aimed at police reform. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

• The New York state Attorney General filed a lawsuit against Bevelyn Beatty and Edmee Chavannes, two anti-abortion protesters, accusing them of repeated “obstructive, threatening, harassing, and violent activity” at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Manhattan. Their behavior has continued through the pandemic without wearing masks. (Brooklyn Eagle)

• Turning away eligible people, poor communication, lack of translators, impossible appointments, navigators who can’t navigate. The Citi Field mass vaccination site is a Mets-level disaster. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

• Starting at some point next week, 188 Walgreens sites, 75 Rite Aid sites and five Costco sites will have vaccinations available (in limited quantity). (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Vaccine stories from restaurant industry pros who’ve managed to get appointments range from ‘easy-peasy’ to ‘total shitshow.’ (Jennifer Joan Nelson for Brooklyn Magazine)

Three pop-up COVID-19 vaccination sites are set to open in northeast Queens, in Bayside, Jamaica and South Richmond Hill for Queens residents. (Jenna Bagcal for QNS)

Three small vaccine dispensary sites came online in the Lower East Side this week at community centers, public housing complexes, and cultural centers which will eventually lead to dispensaries opening at all 33 NYCHA Senior Housing Developments. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

• Covid-19 vaccine providers can start redistributing second doses if someone doesn’t get their second shot within the 42-day timeframe, including moving unused doses from long-term care facilities. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

• The federal government increased New York’s vaccine allocation by 5% this week, making the new allocation “inadequate plus 5%.” (Matt Troutman for Patch)

• Andrew Yang has declared a new enemy: eternal sidewalk scaffolding. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

• The mayoral race looks to AOC. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

• In the eternal battle between the city and state, some mayoral candidates have begun talking about changing the balance of power of the MTA’s board to give the city a bigger say over the MTA. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

A look at Scott Stringer’s transportation plan, including more bike lanes, more pedestrian zones, reforming parking rules, reducing parking placards for city employees, more buses, and reducing community boards’ ability to block street safety projects. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Here are the Republican candidates running for mayor. (Juan Manuel Benitez for NY1)

• Brownsville’s Betsy Head Park officially reopened to the public last week after a $30 million renovation. (Jake Samieske for Brooklyn Magazine)

Everything you need to know about buying your first home in NYC. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

• Interactive Map: Explore New York City’s Black history with the Landmarks Preservation Commissions “Preserving Significant Places of Black History.” (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

• A new state mandate will ensure health insurance companies in New York must immediately cover fertility treatments for queer couples. (Tat Bellamy-Walker for Gay City News)

What does NYC’s Public Advocate do? (Afia Eama for Gothamist)

• Real Estate Lust: A $6.5 million Noho loft with huge, arched windows overlooking Broadway, 10-foot-long fireplace, 20 feet of closets in the main bedroom, and more. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

A guide to splurge-worthy takeout. (Emily Wilson for RESY)

The Briefly for June 18, 2020 – The “One Billion Dollars in Cuts” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD’s new disciplinary transparency, phase two can start on Monday, a guide to the June 23 primary, where to find red velvet cake, and more

Today – Low: 66˚ High: 73˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Governor Cuomo says the city can start phase 2 of reopening on Monday. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

This is the last year that Juneteenth will not be a New York State holiday. State employees will get Juneteenth as a holiday via executive order and Governor Cuomo said he’ll introduce legislation to recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday for 2021. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The City’s guide to the June 23 primaries. (Christine Chung for The City)

Video: The Democratic primary debate between Suraj Patel, Lauren Ashcraft, Peter Harrison, and Rep. Carolyn Maloney to represent portions of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens. (Emily Ngo, primary moderated by Errol Lewis for NY1)

Planned Parenthood hasn’t made an endorsement in the 15th Congressional District Democratic primary, but they have come out in opposition of City Councilmember Rubén Díaz Sr. in a new set of ads, highlighting his anti-abortion and homophobic comments from his past. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Senator Chuck Schumer endorsed Rep. Eliot Engel as the Democratic establishment has lined up behind Engle, who recently said “If I didn’t have a primary, I wouldn’t care” about the George Floyd protests around the city. (Marianne LeVine for Politico)

Cutting overtime, not replacing 2,300 retiring cops, replacing school cops with safety agents, and more. A look at the City Council’s proposed $1 billion in cuts to the NYPD’s budget. (Sally Goldenberg and Joe Anuta for Politico)

“As I’m standing there with my riot helmet and being called a ‘coon,’ people have no idea that I identify with them. I understand them. I’m here for them. I’ve been trying to be here as a change agent.” -Black NYPD officers sound off on how they feel about the George Floyd Protesters. (Ashley Southall and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

Where was the good cop to help me?” -Dounya Zayer, the woman shoved to the street by a cop, who suffers from a concussion, seizures, nausea, insomnia, and migraines as a result. Through the testimony during NY Attorney General’s first day of hearing about the NYPD’s actions during George Floyd protests, James attempted to make the case that there are “good cops” in the NYPD, despite none of them stepping up to actually protect and serve the people of the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The NYPD’s disciplinary records will soon be available in an online database, according to Mayor de Blasio. The NYPD will also be required to publish all internal trial decisions and information for all pending cases. There is no deadline for these measures and no known punishment if they aren’t followed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

What the hell is the NYPD doing by barricading off sections of Carl Schulz Park near the NYC Ferry docks? They are “protecting” Gracie Mansion from “protesters,” who have rarely ever used the park as a place to protest. The NYPD is selectively allowing people through, which you should read as “letting white people through.” While park space is at a premium, this is despicable. (Steven Yago for Streetsblog)

There are several additional blocks in the city that are blocked off that aren’t on the list of Open Streets. They are streets that the NYPD has illegally blocked off streets outside their precincts. The NYPD nor Mayor de Blasio have anything to say about this. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A Brooklyn man plans to sue the NYPD after an officer tackled him during a barbecue on Memorial Day in Crown Heights, causing burns from hot coals and scrapes, according to a notice of claim filed by his lawyer. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A class-action lawsuit was filed against the City of New York, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea, and a series of individual police officers for allegedly violating a bail reform law by allegedly wrongfully detaining New Yorkers following a DUI. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Without tourists or office workers, Times Square is a ghost town.

Thousands of New Yorkers sleeping in shelters face a disproportionately high mortality rate during the pandemic, according to a Coalition for the Homeless report. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

The Bowery Residents’ Committee’s work to get homeless New Yorkers on the subways into shelters has been questionable at best. A recent report from the MTA Inspector General notes they are “very expensive” while having “minimal effectiveness.” Despite the report, they are in line for a new $68.5 million contract with the MTA. (Jose Martinex for The City)

City Councilmember Brad Lander and Mayor de Blasio are worried that no one will continue their fight to rezone Gowanus if the work isn’t done before they both leave office. Maybe that’s a sign that it isn’t a good idea? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

Will the late summer and fall resemble a bustling springtime market when it comes to real estate in the city? The plan to reopen the city’s real-estate industry. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The MTA has deemed its disinfecting UV light pilot program a success and is expanding it. Last month, a doctor working at Columbia University demonstrated the first-ever UV light that killed the virus on the subway. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The mayor has tested negative for Covid-19. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Lincoln Center is honoring Pride by lighting its fountains and columns with a rainbow light installation. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Prestigious all-girls schools, including Spence, Brearley, and Chapin, have been rocked by allegations of racism made by generations of black graduates on Instagram. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

Ippudo will allow takeout for the first time in 12 years. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Photos: “A Love Letter to New York,” an art installation that has placed elaborate floral arrangements across the city. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Where to find red velvet cake ahead of Juneteenth. (Kristen Adaway For Thrillist)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 10, 2020 – The “An Actual Piece of Good News for NYC” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of NYC restaurants, the repeal of 50a, each borough gets a Black Lives Matter street, support for disbanding the NYPD, restaurant guide, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 80˚
Rain overnight.

Mayor de Blasio announced that while the city may seem ready for a June 22 phase two reopening, we shouldn’t expect phase two to begin before July. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Sunday was a new low for the city in a good way. Only 1% of people tested for Covid-19 tested positive. Hospital admittances were at 52 on Sunday, far from the peak at 850. Transmission is still high, with hundreds of new cases every day. This good news isn’t a reason to stop being careful, it’s signs that what we are doing is working. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is supporting the idea of disbanding the NYPD, looking to follow Minneapolis’s lead. Police Benevolent Association President Pat Lynch is against the idea, but let’s be clear about this, he doesn’t get to have a seat at the table or a voice in this discussion. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The State Senate voted to repeal 50a. Governor Cuomo has vowed to sign the legislation. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

City courts are scheduled to reopen starting today since their closure in March, with precautions. Outside of emergencies, most matters will still be handled virtually. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Here are the rules for outdoor dining, which is allowed starting with phase two, slated for June 22. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

That hasn’t stopped restaurants from putting out tables and chairs for customers, which are inevitably used for dining. The most blatant is the White Horse Tavern, which announced it was open for business on Instagram and has been encouraging customers to use the tables and chairs for dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state has released its rules for indoor dining, as portions of the state are already looking at phase three. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If tables aren’t placed more than six feet apart, restaurants may have to construct five-foot barriers, ie. cubicles, between the tables with a maximum of 10 people per table. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deeper look at six critical points for restaurants before reopening. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Alibi Lounge, one of the city’s only Black-owned LGBTQ bars is in danger of closing. There is a GoFundMe, which is at $11,000 of its $50,000 goal. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

When will you be ready to go back to concerts, fly in an airplane, or attend a dinner party? The Times asked 511 epidemiologists and the short version is that it could be a year or more before things come close to returning to normal. (Margot Sanger-Katz, Claire Cain Miller and Quoctrung Bui for NY Times)

Today’s hero is former Mayor de Blasio Senior Adviser Alison Hirsh, who resigned after the mayor’s near-unconditional defense of the NYPD and will begin as an adviser to Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza in the Department of Education. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Now that the City Council and state legislature have rendered his opinion unnecessary for public debate, the mayor is in support of banning chokeholds and possible NYPD funding cuts. Always ready to take a stand one second after it doesn’t matter. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“But right now we’re asking him to speak up, we’re asking him to stand behind his campaign, we’re asking him to stand behind his mission of equity, we’re asking him to just support us. He isn’t listening to us.” Why did Mayor de Blasio’s staffers protest him on Monday? (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Photos: Just because curfew is over does not mean the protests in support of Black Lives Matter have stopped. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Portraits: Why we are protesting. (Hiram Alejandro Durán for The City)

Officer Vincent D’Andraia was charged with assault for shoving a woman protesting to the ground. He’ll be charged with misdemeanor assault for the incident. The victim of his assault hit her head on the ground and sustained a concussion and seizure after the attack. (John Del Signore and JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Video: Wrapping up the NYPD union’s garbage rhetoric in one minute and nine seconds. (@bubbaprog)

One street in each of the five boroughs will be painted to send a message to New York City: Black Lives Matter, mirroring Washington DC’s tactics. The streets were not specified when the announcement was made. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Recent reports have been raising concerns that the NYPD’s Intelligence Division, along with the FBI, have been questioning protesters arrested on curfew violations about their political sympathies and affiliations, along with their social media behavior. This would violate a 35-year-old consent decree meant to keep the police from investigation protected political speech. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A guide to New York City’s sculpture parks. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Sometimes you need to turn your mind off and look at a list of banal things. Here are 11 celebrities spending their quarantine in NYC. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

So you’ve optimized your bedroom and workspace while suffering through the quarantine for Covid-19, it’s time to turn your attention to some creative entryway ideas. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 1, representing Greenpoint and Williamsburg, bought itself an SUV with public funds last year, which wasn’t the most popular decision. It was scheduled to hold executive committee elections this month, but the board has introduced a measure to suspend this year’s elections. Nothing like an old-fashioned power grab in the middle of a crisis. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Say farewell to whatever the hell “Rhode Island-style” pizza was supposed to be. After a year in the East Village, Violet is closing its doors. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A Bronx Democrat City Councilmember who has publicly said may vote for Trump, has made openly homophobic statements, and opposes abortion. Meet Rubén Díaz Sr., who wants to represent the Bronx in Congress. (Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

“The winner in the 15th Congressional District will face untold numbers of issues in office next year. The candidate we believe will most closely align himself with the values and goals we hold dear is Ritchie Torres. And we know only too well that the election of Ruben Diaz, Sr., would be a tragic step backwards for the cause of equality and inclusion in American society.
-Paul Schindler for Gay City News, Progressives Must Unite Around Ritchie Torres in the Bronx

Photos: Congrats to the winners of Coney Island USA’s “Maskies” face mask competition. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Apartment Porn: An $2 million Hamilton Heights apartment with a roof deck as big as the apartment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Harlem’s Schomburg Center released the Black Liberation Reading List, a list of 95 books that foster a greater understanding of Black history and culture. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

NYC restaurant reopening guide. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!