The Briefly for February 16-18, 2021 – The “Because Whoopi Goldberg Told Me To” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: 22 hour subway service starts soon, drama in the bird community, the Soho Grifter is out, the oldest bars on the UWS, and more

Today – Low: 20˚ High: 44˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

22-hour subway service will start on 2/22, shutting down daily from 2-4 am. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Nearly a quarter of New York City’s students with disabilities have not received all of the services they’re entitled to this school year, according to new figures that offer the most comprehensive picture yet of special education during the pandemic. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The MTA got 25 celebrities to record Covid-19 PSAs for the subways. Finally New Yorkers will follow mask and social distancing guidelines because Michael Rapaport and Whoopi Goldberg told them to. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

• The seawall to protect Staten Island from another Hurricane Sandy was scheduled to be finished this year, but construction isn’t expected to be finished for another five years or more. Radiation from a 1940s landfill in Great Kills Park halted progress on the East Shore Seawall as the city, state, and federal governments fight over who”s responsible for getting rid of the radiation. (Clifford Michel for The City)

The Bronx is #2 highest risk in the country from natural disasters only behind Los Angeles. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

• Green-Wood Cemetery wants your help to identify thousands of WWII soldiers buried at the cemetery. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

• Good question: What does the mayor of NYC actually do? (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

A look at how the roots of the NAACP run through Greenwich Village. (Joey Rodriguez for GVSHP)

• Video: Kissaki chef Mark Garcia makes 200-300 omakase to-go boxes every night. (Director Pelin Keskin for Eater)

• It’s not just your imagination, the city’s snowstorms have been getting worse. (Lydia McMullen-Laird for Gothamist)

• If you’re in the latest group of New Yorkers eligible for the vaccine, you’ve learned that the state’s vaccine website is utter garbage and can’t keep up with demand. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The alleged subway stabber, Rigoberto Lopez, was arrested. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

NYC’s bird watching community is feeling the pressure of popularity after getting a wider amount of interest form the general public in the last year. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

• Anna Sorokin aka Anna Delvey, the fake heiress grifter convicted of grand larceny, is out of prison and working on a memoir and a TV show. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Revel is expanding its service to electric bikes for a subscription cost of $90/month. you’ll get a pedal-assisted bike to use for as long as you’re a subscriber rather than their traditional model of looking for one on the street. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

9 indie Brooklyn bookstores to visit. (Emilie Murphy for Brooklyn Magazine)

• Governor Cuomo almost apologized, but still didn’t, for his administration’s actions that led to the Covid-19 nursing scandal. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

What it’s like to run a movie theater, the Cobble Hill Cinema, in a pandemic. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Thanks to reader Lolita for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 7-8, 2021 – The “$25 Billion Party No One Showed Up For” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Name a roach after your ex, leaping slush puddles, a dog friendly coffee shop, inside the MTA’s $8 billion federal request, and more

Today – Low: 16˚ High: 37˚
Snow (2–4 in.) until evening.

• Ahead of today’s snowstorm, outdoor dining is shut down. (Ron Lee for NY1)

• Here’s advice from an epidemiologist about what you should and shouldn’t do once you have the vaccine. Specifically, if you’re in a group of people in a private space who have all been vaccinated, can you relax? The answer is complicated. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

• Revel is expanding past scooters and will be installing a superhub for electric vehicles in Bed-Stuy. Each of the 30 chargers will provide 100 miles of charge in 20 minutes. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

• The MTA is asking Pete Buttigieg and the federal government for $8 billion in aid for 2021. The City breaks down how the $8 billion is broken out and what may be left behind form the MTA’s capital budget. (Jose Martinez The City)

• Looking at buying an apartment in the city? Here’s a little bit of a cheat sheet to answer the question how much should you put down to buy an apartment? (Ann Lien for StreetEasy)

• The city’s Economic Development Corporation, which is controlled by agreed to increase its financial support to operate NYC Ferry, Mayor de Blasio’s pet project, by up to $64 million. As stated in the article, “the funding move comes as ferry revenue is in decline, a fiscal crisis confronts the city and EDC contributions to the city budget are trending downward.” (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

The top 10 secrets of the Tenement Museum, including its history as a bar and the discovery of a mummified rat. (Untapped New York)

Wall Street has invoked the boogeyman, threatening to leave NYC. As the state is looking into a tax on the securities industry. Wall Street says this “could lead financial firms to move their back-office operations and related jobs outside of New York.” State Senator Julia Salazar proposed a tax that would net the state upwards of $29 billion annually. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

• Sippy Cafe is a new coffee shop, now open in Greenpoint, where you and your dog are both welcome. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

• With Valentine’s Day coming up, don’t miss your opportunity to be as spiteful as possible and name a roach at the Bronx Zoo after someone you used to love. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

• Video: Members of the Guardian Angels appeared to start a fight on the subway with participants of the weekly Stonewall Inn Trans Liberation march. The Guardian Angels have a history of harassing the city’s queer communities and their leader Curtis Sliwa announced his mayoral candidacy as a Republican for 2021. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• Governor Cuomo is considering changing his mind about indoor dining (again), this time maybe opening it up a day or two earlier than Valentine’s Day. It seems unnecessarily cruel to waver like this when restaurants need time to prepare to open their indoor spaces to the public. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

• In another reversal of state policy, the state will vaccinate 1.075 people over the age of 65 in Corrections Department custody. This change happened a few hours after the state was sued by inmates for access to the vaccine. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• The city is looking for a new operator for the Central Park ice rink and carousel after terminating its contracts with the Trump Organization. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

• Eric See, chef and owner of Ursula in Crown Heights, is launching a takeout series this month where six NYC-based queer chefs will take over the restaurant, each serving food that is essential to their personality. You can pre-order from each chef and a small supply will be reserved for walk-ins. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

• As much as I shit on Staten Island’s Republican House Representative Nicole Malliotakis in these emails, I will give her credit for being one of the eleven Repubicans with a spine who voted to strip Marjorie Taylor Greene of her committee posts. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

• The 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs get most of the love in NYC, but NYC also hosted the World’s Fair in 1853, which included “The Finest Building in America,” a crystal palace, built where Bryant Park is today. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

• An NYPD sergeant was sporting a “Make Enforcement Great Again” patch by protesters last week outside the 85th Precinct in Brooklyn. According to the NYPD, the officer has “received an initial discipline” but has not elaborated on what that discipline was. Members of the NYPD are not allowed to wear or say something that expresses personal political beliefs while on duty. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

• Who would have thought that no one wants to go to Hudson Yards during a pandemic. It’s like a $25 billion party that no one showed up for. (Matthew Haag and Dana Rubinstein for NY Times)

• Photos: Every New Yorkers’ favorite olympic activity the slush puddle avoidance leap. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

• Interview: Dianne Morales discusses her run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

What to know about the 2021 NYC City Council races. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

What does an NYC City Council member do? (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

15 exciting new restaurants in Brooklyn. (Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 2-4, 2021 – The “Who Needs Health Experts?” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Mayoral candidates debate, the 16 year wait for a park, Sunnyside’s “Limpdick Landlord,” Yankee Stadium becomes a vaccination site, and more

Today – Low: 27˚ High: 33˚
Snow (1–2 in.) until evening.

PlowNYC is an interactive map to find out when the last time your street was plowed. (cityofnewyork.us)

The special election for Queens Council District 24 is still happening today, despite the storm. Early voting has been open since January 23. Four of the eight candidates have requested a delay, but the mayor’s office said the election will push forward. (Christine Chung for The City)

Find your City Council district using your address with this map.

How does ranked choice voting work in NYC? (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Yankee Stadium will become a mass vaccination site for Bronx residents only. Ten zip codes near the stadium are at a 10.32% positivity rate. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Interview: Gothamist asked Dr. Adam Berman, a toxicologist and chairman of emergency medicine at Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Hospital, should you avoid pain relievers before or after taking the Covid-19 vaccine? The simple answer is that if you can avoid doing them, avoid them, but there’s not enough evidence against it. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

“As the vaccine effort ramps up, Cuomo and the MTA have a very easy way to gracefully usher in the return of passengers to the subways on a 24/7 by tying it to access to vaccination hubs.”
-Benjamin Kabak, How the vaccine creates a politically expedient way to end the overnight subway closures, for Second Ave. Sagas

Governor Cuomo said in a press conference that he doesn’t really trust health experts. Maybe that’s why nine of his top health officials quit their jobs in the last year. This guy literally released a book about leadership lessons. (J. David Goodman, Joseph Goldstein, and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Restaurant workers, deemed to be “essential” by Governor Cuomo, are not essential enough to be eligible for the coronavirus vaccine as indoor dining resumes on February 14. Governor Cuomo was forced to defend his decision, saying it was based on “data and expert advice.” Which experts? (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announced the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP) in 2014 to reduce crime in 15 high-crime housing developments. In those 15 developments, the number of major crimes in those developments was up in 2020. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Death by Speculation, Starring Limpdick Landlord.” The sign of the year goes to the shuttered Center Cinemas in Sunnyside. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

New York spent $18.2 billion in 2019 on police, jails, prisons, prosecutors, parole, and probation while only spending about $6.2 billion on mental health services, public health, youth programs and services, recreation, and elder services according to a new report from the Center for Community Alternatives. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

The mayoral candidates had their first debate. Focus seemed to be on the Yang campaign’s use of NDAs for campaign staffers, Eric Adams’ comments that some New Yorkers should “go back to Iowa,” and Raymond McGuire’s work with CitiBank after the financial collapse. (Dana Rubinstein for NY Times)

One topic that’s bubbling up again amongst the candidates is city control over the subways, which is sound like a conceptually good idea until the city has to take on the subway’s debt. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Interview: Zach Iscol discusses his mayoral campaign. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

Another week, another story about NYC Sheriffs breaking up a party in an illegal club, this time in Jackson Heights. This pandemic is never going to end with jackasses like this. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights Post)

The city promised to build a new 3-acre park in Greenpoint in 2005 in exchange for allowing new luxury condos to be built in the neighborhood. Sixteen years later Greenpoint is still waiting for its park. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Barclays Center is looking to diversify its vendors, looking for Brooklyn-based suppliers that are a minimum 51% owned, operated, and managed by minorities, women, disabled, and/or military veterans. (Jake Samieske for Brooklyn Magazine)

Super Bowl spreads from NYC restaurants. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Fifteen favorite tofu dishes in city restaurants. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Jenn for today’s featured photo!