The Briefly for December 1-3, 2020 – The “New York City’s Least Wanted” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The city’s new test time wait “tool,” AOC for mayor?, the plan to reopen schools, a food gift guide, Times Square is sad, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 53˚
Possible drizzle in the morning.

The city launched a Covid-19 test wait time tool for Health + Hospitals test sites. Don’t get too excited. It’s a PDF that updates every 15 minutes, but as of writing this, it was still showing yesterday’s wait times. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

400 idiots were found in a party in Manhattan at 3 am on Saturday by the city’s Sherrif, who broke up the party. (Mihir Zaveri for NY Times)

The Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home’s funeral director’s license was revoked. This is after dozens of decomposing bodies were found in trucks outside of the funeral home at the height of the pandemic. (Kimiko de Freytas-Tamura for NY Times)

The MTA was scheduled to receive the first of its new open gangway design cars this year, which won’t be happening due to a supply-chain slowdown. The first of the new cars are expected sometime next year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Governor Cuomo laid out five strategies to prevent overwhelming the state’s hospitalization system. Hospital capacity, testing, keeping as many schools open as possible, limiting small gatherings, and getting a vaccination program ready. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

New York’s least wanted. Accent: Fake Posh. Eyes: Dead Behind. Married to Slenderman? Yes. (@TGLNYC on Instagram)

Being envious of a realistic apartment in a video game may be something that is uniquely New York. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

6sqft selects food gifts from 21 NYC restaurants and shops. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

I love the idea of secret tunnels and passageways existing throughout the city, like the abandoned passageway between the Hotel Roosevelt and Grand Central Terminal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Roberta’s Pizza is closed, as a number of workers contracted COVID-19. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

What’s one way to make viewing the Rockefeller Christmas tree worse during a global pandemic? How about a bunch of rules and needing tickets to see it? I appreciate the idea, but this underscores just how much this year is the worst. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

InThe Coney Island Polar Bear Club has canceled the January 1st swim. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

In better news, SantaCon is also canceled. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Laying out the unlikely case for AOC for mayor in 2021. (Amba Guerguerian for The Indypendent)

Andrew Yang is still considering a run at the mayorship. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Arlene’s Grocery may be forced to close on February 1. They’re looking to raise $80,000 on goFundMe to stay open. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

“They’re not going to enforce their own laws. Obviously, we’re not seeing the enforcement around precincts, especially some of mine, where police vehicles are parked everywhere, blocking crosswalks.” The City Council is fed up with the NYPD treating sidewalks like their own personal parking lot. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Middle and high school buildings across the city will not reopen for in-person learning until 2021 with no specific date announced. Elementary and younger will reopen on December 3 and the city will lose the 3% threshold that got us into this mess in the first place. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Also in the “not for a while” category is congestion pricing, which the MTA now says may not be happening until 2023. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Former UCB employees launched The Squirrel Comedy Theater with an aim towards inclusivity after UCB’s closure in April. Right now you can find them streaming on Wednesday and Thursday nights on Twitch. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The NY Times has discovered that if Times Square is empty, it’s pretty depressing. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

An ode to New York City’s elevated trains. (Joy Masoff for Untapped New York)

A look at why eviction filings are up, despite the eviction moratorium. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

The chief executive of the New York Road Runners, the nonprofit behind the NYC Marathon, will step down in the face of allegations that he fostered a toxic and racist work culture. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A manhole cover of a mysterious origin. The city’s history still has questions we can’t answer. (Ephemeral New York)

Updated: The ultimate Manhattan delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of Harlem at dawn!

The Briefly for November 24 – 26, 2020 – The “Staten Island is a Problem” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo’s Covid-19 announcement, Astor Place Hairstylists saved, 2020’s Thanksgiving parade, apartment lust, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

RIP David Dinkins, NYC’s first Black mayor. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

What you should know before getting testing for Covid-19. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what to expect from the Thanksgiving Day parade this year. (Gas Saltonstall for Patch)

5 places to get a vegetarian Thanksgiving meal. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

Tracy Morgan joined the non-profit Food Bank For New York City and Councilman Robert Cornegy in giving away 1,000 turkeys outside the Sumner Houses in Bed-Stuy. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

On Central Park’s Pilgrim Hill stands a statue “to commemorate the landing of the Pilgrim fathers on Plymouth Rock.” On the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landing, how appropriate that we’re about to all give each other disease while giving thanks. (Ephemeral New York)

Upper Manhattan and Staten Island are now Covid-19 yellow and orange zones. Staten Island is, in the words of Governor Cuomo, “a problem.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The state is reopening an emergency COVID-19 field hospital on Staten Island in South Beach to accommodate the uptick in hospitalizations. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The governor is in some hot water after letting it out that he had invited his mother and daughters over for Thanksgiving while telling the rest of us to stay distanced from each other. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

Cuomo isn’t the only elected official making idiotic moves this week. Mayoral hopeful Eric Adams decided that the middle of a pandemic is the perfect time to host an indoor fundraiser with 18 supporters on the Upper West Side. Technically, the NYC Sheriff should be fining Adams $15,000 for organizing and promoting a violation of the state’s rules regarding indoor dining. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

On the menu at City Winery? A mandatory $50 Covid-19 test. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Despite the drop in subway ridership, the number of incidents where someone was reported on the tracks is on pace to top last year’s number. (Jose Martinez for The City)

In response to an uptick in people being shoved onto subway tracks as of late, Mayor de Blasio says the NYPD presence on the subways will be increased. The mayor also noted that he hadn’t spoken to NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea about his plan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Blind Pig has begun its transformation into the new Coyote Ugly. (EV Grieve)

Bluestockings, which had closed earlier this year, has a new location and “a lot of magic is happening.” (Pooja Salhotra for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Lust: A four-floor, $4.85 million, 1899 Clinton Hill townhouse with wide outdoor space, a side-by-side dual shower (!!!), an open outdoor space, and five bedrooms. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

The Times is anticipating that the departure of Polly Trottenberg, the city’s Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, is the first in a long line of people who will be abandoning the mayor’s sinking ship as his term comes to a close. Trottenberg is most closely tied to Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero campaign, which aims to end traffic fatalities by 2024. Traffic fatalities are up this year. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This is unexpected. Governor Cuomo won an International Emmy award for his daily press briefings. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Video: A drone’s eye view of Harlem and Crown Heights. (Drone Fanatic)

Briget Rein, City Council Candidate for the 39th District in Brooklyn, is calling for a moratorium on Gowanus rezoning, citing the ULURP process cannot proceed fairly during a pandemic that would lock out the voices of many in the neighborhood, even if it was moved online. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Attention! There is a glut of apples and squash at the city’s farmer’s markets! (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Astor Place Hairstylists was saved by a group of extremely wealthy investors that would keep the barbershop open “for at least another 75 years.” Maybe spread some of that wealth to other businesses that are also being driven out of existence? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that Lavita McMath Turner will be its first chief diversity officer, five months after a staff letter urged the museum to look at the white supremacy and systemic racism in the institution. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio laid out the city’s strategy to get the city’s schools open. Students with disabilities will return first, following by early education programs, then elementary school students, then middle and high school students. This is assuming the city avoids the state’s “orange zone” status, which seems unlikely. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Beginning in 2021, the Democrats in the New York state senate will have a supermajority and the legislature will be able to stand up to and override vetos from Governor Cuomo. This is the first state supermajority since 1846. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

The story behind the closing of Gloria’s in Crown Heights goes back 20 years and might be one of the most bizarre stories of the entire year. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Up in the air! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a New York City property tax assessment drone! (Peter Senzamici for The City)

The best Black Friday + Cyber Week deals from NYC brands and small businesses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A wonderful story of how Ariel Cordova-Rojas saved a swan. How many times will you see a swan on the subway? (Troy Closson for NY Times)

In tribute to Century 21. (Reginald Ferguson for Brooklyn Based)

If you were one of the people who bought the “Virus Shut Out Cards,” congratulations, you’ve been scammed. (Payton Potter for Patch)

Apartment Lust: The photos of this $1.45 million Morningside Heights apartment may not look like much, but it was once the home of President Obama. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Behind the scenes with the decision by the de Blasio administration to close the city’s schools after the city hit a 3% positivity rate. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

With the GSA recognizing Biden as the winner of the presidential election, what’s the status of congestion pricing? Governor Cuomo doesn’t think it’s important enough to discuss with President-elect Biden. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

A look at how the city’s TV shows and movies resumed production. (Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

If you’ve been obsessing over Queen’s Gambit, maybe it’s time to explore NYC’s chess scene. (Victoria Choe for Untapped New York)

The best new delivery options in Manhattan. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of the ginkgo foliage at Broadway and 143rd!

The Briefly for November 20-12, 2020 – The “Rockefeller the Owl” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The school building shutdown, how restaurants may be impacted, Dupree G.O.D. turns himself in, the best Brazilian restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 42˚ High: 61˚

The Rockefeller Christmas Tree has arrived and holy shit, it’s very sad. (Brian Kahn for Gizmodo)

How sad? Crews were seen adding extra branches to the tree to make it look less 2020. (Nicholas Rice for People)

The only good part about the tree is the tiny owl that hitched a ride in the tree and was rescued after being discovered. It’s a good owl. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Rockefeller the Owl joins Central Park’s Barry the barred owl as this year’s hot duck. (Lisa M. Collins for NY Times)

Okay, so school buildings are shut down and all learning is now remote because the city hit the 3% threshold set by the mayor, right? (Christina Veiga with contributions from Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

There is currently no school reopening plan yet. (Jillian Jorgensen for NY1)

But some preschools are still open. Nonprofit and private-operated pre-K can remain open, but in education department buildings, pre-K is closed. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Wednesday was a confusing day if you were paying attention to the news. In the middle of a press conference by Governor Cuomo, the mayor announced schools would close on Thursday. We are past cute with these two politicians who can’t see eye-to-eye and we are at a dangerous moment if they can’t get on the same page. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Meanwhile, Governor Cuomo says that if the city’s positivity rate hits 3%, new restrictions will hit the city’s restaurants, businesses, gyms, hair salons, and houses of worship. According to the state on Wednesday, the positivity rate was 2.5%. (Elizabeth Kim and Christoper Robbins for Gothamist)

The state says the positivity rate was at 2.5% on Wednesday, the city says 3.0%. A look at why the city and state report different numbers and it’s not, as Governor Cuomo put it, “a difference of opinion.” (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

While the city is closing all school buildings, indoor dining remains open. Why? The mayor controls the closing of school buildings, the governor controls the closing of everything else. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

There were 11,000 restaurant positions added in the city in October, and over 100,000 jobs have been regained since March. A 3.0% in the state’s positivity rate could upend that progress. (Greg David for The City)

“I don’t think it’s if the city is going into an orange zone, it’s a when the city’s going into an orange zone.” The mayor isn’t optimistic about our chances of staying under 3.0% in the state’s eyes. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The governor announced new yellow zone micro-clusters in Mott Haven, Parkchester, and Highbridge in the Bronx, and Astoria, Jackson Heights, and Woodside in Queens. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A new bill from the City Council would allow restaurants to charge a 15% Covid-19 surcharge if they pay their staff a minimum wage of $15. A law last month allows restaurants to charge a 10% surcharge. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The MTA says without federal support, the sky will be falling. For the MTA, the sky falling looks like a 40% cut in subway service, a 50% cut in the LIRR and MetroNorth, and cutting 9,367 jobs. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The City Reliquary, a museum of city artifacts, is fighting to stay open with a new membership program. (Keira Wingate for Bklyner)

Apartment Porn: I’ll be honest, this might be the most jaw-dropping apartment the city has. A three-level penthouse in Billionaires’ Row will be up for auction at the end of the year at 150 Central Park South. Five beds, five and a half baths, and four terraces with Central Park views. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A billionaire is teaming up with a real estate developer to put up a billboard in hopes to inspire New Yorkers into believing that New York isn’t dead. Are you ready to be inspired by Jerry Seinfeld and Miki Naftali’s billboard? (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

Opponents of the city’s billion-dollar East Side Coastal Resilience project begun putting posters across the neighborhood calling Mayor de Blasio and Councilmember Carolina Rivera “destroyers” of East River Park. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Remember the eco-yogi slumlords of Brooklyn? They’re being sued by the city of New York for violating eviction law, for tenant harassment, and for construction and code violations. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

Need a refresher? The Eco–Yogi Slumlords of 1214 Dean Street, Brooklyn. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

The fastest places to get a COVID-19 test in NYC. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Meet the luckiest woman in NYC. She was pushed onto the subway tracks with a train arriving at the station and survived by ducking under the train. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside the new glass dome atop Union Square’s Tammany Hall. (Dana Schulz, Photos by Christopher Payne for 6sqft)

One of my favorite things when walking around the city is to look for pieces of history that have outlived the people who built them. The New York Sun clock on Broadway between Reade and Chambers outlived two incarnations of the newspaper. Fun fact: I worked for The New York Sun during its last year from 2007 to 2008 and would pass this clock every day on my way to work. (Ephemeral New York)

Earlier this week, rapper Dupree G.O.D. jumped on top of a B26 bus with a flame thrower and began… throwing flames. It was a part of filming a video for a song, but no one on the bus knew they were in a music video. He turned himself in to the NYPD on Wednesday. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

What to expect when you’re expecting the Gowanus Canal to be cleaned up. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The 15 best Brazilian restaurants in NYC. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s photo from Central Park!