The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for September 26, 2019 – The “Nightmare NIMBY Neighborhood” Edition

The MTA’s $51.4 billion Captial Plan was approved, white New Yorkers are twice as likely to smoke marijuana, Facebook eyes the post office, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Working Families Party is accusing Governor Cuomo of creating a conspiracy to destroy them for daring to run Cynthia Nixon against him in his last primary. (NY Times)

Andrew Cuomo and his longtime girlfriend Sandra Lee have the world’s largest display of LEGO art” with classics like Michaelangelo’s David, Degas’s Whistler’s Mother, Munch’s The Scream and Van Gogh’s Starry Night interpreted in LEGO starting this weekend at the New York Hall of Science. (Time Out)

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and New York State Attorney General Letitia James sued ICE over the arrests that have taken place outside of the city’s courthouses. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Screaming, propaganda, shoving, conspiracy theories about the Department of Transportation, and accusations of taking money from pedophiles, just another day in the NIMBY-nightmare neighborhood of Park Slope. (Streetsblog)

A peek inside Michael Cera’s new $2.4 million Bed-Stuy home. (Mansion Global)

93% of people arrested for marijuana possession in NYC are black and Latino, but white New Yorkers are twice as likely to have smoked marijuana than anyone else. (Patch)

Operation DUMBO Drop 2019 is a go. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

We are a month away from early voting in this year’s elections, so it’s time to start educating yourself about the five ballot questions. (Gotham Gazette)

The $51.4 billion MTA Capital Plan for 2020 – 2024 was unanimously approved by the MTA’s board and has the support of Mayor de Blasio, with a few strings attached. The city is expected to pay $3 billion towards the plan, but during the current 2015-2019 plan the city was expected to pay $2.66 billion, but only paid $790 million. (Streetsblog)

Facebook is eyeing 740,000 square feet of office space at the the midtown post office. (6sqft)

Photos: Inside a 19th-century paint factory, before it becomes luxury loft apartments. (Untapped Cities)

A gold coffin at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be taken back to Egypt after the realization that it had been stolen. (Patch)

If you were at Paul Simon’s last show in Queens, I have some news for you. He’ll be part of Live From Here with Chris Thile on October 26. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: Inside Long Island City’s new public library. (6sqft)

City schools were all set to have a one day work week this year on December 23, but logic has prevailed and students and teachers will get that day off as well, extending winter break from December 21 through January 2. (Patch)

If you’re a big fan of waiting in long lines to get food, Chinese rice noodle roll and congee restaurant Yin Ji Chang Fen has opened an outpost on Bayard St. (Gothamist)

If you define corruption as an illegal act that benefits an individual without punishment because of their office or position, the Brooklyn Borough President’s office is corrupt for their agreement with the Parks Department that allows officials to park wherever they feel in the park that surrounds Borough Hall without consequence. (The City)

Mapping the development boom transforming Crown Heights. (Curbed)

Hart Island’s been in the news a lot lately, today’s update is that there is a concern that it is running out of space as the city’s public burial grounds. Since the Civil War, over a million people have been buried there and in eight to ten years the city needs to find a new place to bury its dead. (6sqft)

As expected, the vape flavor ban is being challenged in court. (amNY)

The city’s grand plans to update and future-proof the Gowanus Canal cleanup have been killed by the EPA. (6sqft)

Enjoy 10 hours in Gowanus (but not in the Gowanus) with this guide. (Brooklyn Based)

It is a misdemeanor under the city’s Right of Way law to fail to yield to pedestrians or cyclists while making a turn after a state appeals court upheld the law as constitutional. (Gothamist)

Where to get drinks in the theater district. (amNY)

The Briefly for June 26, 2019 – The “The Triboro: Here Comes A New Subway Line” Edition

Rental reforms, Cardi B faces felony charges, the Central Park squirrel census, WorldPride begins, the new I Voted stickers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at changes to the rental laws for everyone. Security deposits are limited to one month’s rent and landlords have 14 days to return them once you’ve moved out, application fees are limited to $20 (even with a background check), and more. (StreetEasy)

A look at how subway delays are tied to the city’s homeless crisis the city is currently facing. In the first three months of 2019, there was nearly the same number of train delays related to the homeless as there was in all of 2014. (NY Times)

Manhattan post-work bar picks. (amNY)

The Triboro is an idea for a new subway line that would start in the Bronx, stop in Randall’s Island, head down through Astoria, cut through Ridgewood and cut through the southern parts of Brooklyn down to Bay Ridge and possibly continue on to the St. George, where the Staten Island Ferry terminates. While it sounds like a fantasy, the proposed cost is less than half of the Second Avenue subway, would connect 17 different subway lines along the route. A bill was introduced by Latrice Walker to the state assembly that would require the MTA to conduct a feasibility study. (Welcome2TheBronx)

How to spend 10 hours in Greenpoint. (Brooklyn Based)

Louis CK continues to have problems with consent when it comes to the venues he performs in. Brooklyn Bazaar released an apology after the masturbating-into-a-plant-while-blocking-the-door comedian appeared at a rental event as a “surprise.” (BrooklynVegan)

The MTA may never make your commute smoother, but a change in perspective and a decent amount of patience can go a long way, which is what author Reny Amoros set out to do in ‘7 Life Lessons the NYC Subway Unintentionally Taught Me.’ (Reny Amoros)

Video: Capturing the ‘Beyond the Streets’ graffiti and street art exhibit in one minute by Chop ‘Em Down Films. (Brooklyn Street Art)

Passive-aggressive notes never go far in NYC, and the one Nobletree Coffee left as a reason for their closing faired just as well. After they tried to blame low foot traffic in the neighborhood, their note was met with another accusing them of having mediocre coffee and bad service. (Eater)

As Gowanus’ rezoning hangs over the neighborhood like the sword of Damaclese, the Landmarks Preservation Commission put five buildings in the neighborhood into consideration for landmark status. (Curbed)

The city’s schools are coming up short when it comes to room for special education children in pre-Kindergarten. At the low end, the city is 200 seats short, but program closures put the number closer to 300. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Harbir Parmar was sentenced to three years in prison for kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman who was supposed to be his Uber fare. He also charged her over $1,000 for the trip and for that he plead guilty of wire fraud. (Gothamist)

A list of places for tourists to go (none of them are “straight to hell) during WorldPride. (NY Times)

These new “I Voted” stickers are boring compared to the subway-themed stickers. (Gothamist)

The first of three ASPCA low-cost vet centers will be built in East New York and is expected to open next year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Whoops. Looks like Cardi B will be facing 14 total charges, including felonies, a big difference from the two misdemeanors she previously faced for the incident. (Gothamist)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District, which consists of 54 row houses constructed between 1906 and 1913. (Curbed)

Feltman’s was the original Coney Island hot dog. For two years a revival of the brand was available in Coney Island, but the operators of Luna Park gave Feltman’s the boot following a series of broken promises from Luna Park. The hot dogs are available elsewhere, but no longer in Coney Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Stranger Things will be taking over the Wonder Wheel (which is not a part of Luna Park) On July 4 and through the weekend as a prelude to Stranger Things season 3, Scoops Ahoy will be selling ice cream, ad the July 4 fireworks will be a special Hawkins Fourth of July Spectacular. (amNY)

Desmond Amofah, a YouTube star who went by Etika, went missing last week was found dead in the East River at the age of 29. (Gothamist)

Is there anything our current president’s administration can’t ruin? On the verge of WorldPride the news came out that the federal government “gifted” a flagpole and LGBT pride flag the NYC Parks Department so it wouldn’t have to appear in a national park. As a result, the NYC Parks Department permanently owns the flagpole. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority, who recently complained that Manhattan’s congestion pricing would be financially unfair to people who use its bridges and tunnels, is looking to raise the price of tolls system-wide and place new tolls on Uber and Lyft drivers accessing any of the area’s airports. The board will vote on it in September. (Politico)

The 2019 Central Park Squirrel Census Report is in! There are 2,373 squirrels that live in Central Park. If you really love squirrels or well-designed products, you can also purchase the Census in book form. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A trip to (and photos from) the Department of Sanitation’s Museum of Trash. (Gothamist)

The everything bagel is everything. Sesame and poppy seeds, accompanied by dried garlic, onion, and salt: Anything else, in addition, is against the law( or it should be). Now that we’ve established that the everything bagel is king of the bagels, who invented the combination? Does the lineage go back further than 1979 at Charlie’s Bagels in Howard Beach? (Atlas Obscura)

Photos from the start of WorldPride. (NY Times)

Facebook is looking at a one million-square-foot lease at 50 Hudson Yards. No public announcement, no massive tax breaks, no helicopter pad on the roof. (The Real Deal)

The Broadway show King Kong announced it will be closing in August after disappointing reviews and ticket sales. (NY Times)

20 of the city’s tastiest and quirkiest ice cream shops. (6sqft)

The mayor’s office lobbied, against a change in the city’s charter aimed at allowing the Civilian Complaint Review Board to prosecute discipline charges when police officers lie during an investigation of misconduct. The mayor’s argument is that the current system works fine. (Gotham Gazette)

Do the police belong at Pride? (NY Times)

21 top restaurants in Flatiron and Gramercy. (Eater)